Nick Nelson injured during private workout with Lions

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As initially reported by NFL Media, Wisconsin cornerback Nick Nelson injured his knee during a private workout. PFT has learned that the team for which he was working out was the Lions.

Per a source with knowledge of the situation, the injury happened within the first five minutes of the workout.

It could have happened with any team; the fact that it was the Lions is immaterial. The bigger question is whether players should continue to agree to submit to private workouts.

At some point in every job-interview process, the hay has been stacked in the barn. That’s particularly important in situations like this, where the process of baling the hay entails a real physical risk for those under consideration for employment.

The situation also cries out for the NFL and NFLPA to work together to ensure that players who suffer injuries during the Scouting Combine, Pro Day workouts, and/or private workouts will receive proper compensation for their reduced earnings. While players can purchase insurance policies to protect against this type of risk, they shouldn’t have to.

And if they want to get the NFL’s attention on this issue, players should refuse to engage in any physical activities after finishing their college careers. If enough of the top prospects do it, the league will have no choice but to implement meaningful protections.

36 responses to “Nick Nelson injured during private workout with Lions

  1. Again, Players never ever ever agree to a private workout until you have a conteact in place

    He just lost $$$ because of it

  2. The road to nfl riches is rough and rocky so if they dont want enter the nfls employment line they can just stay home and watch on tv.

  3. Another opportunity for the XFL. Incoming college players will not be forced or blackballed into performing physical activities prior to the draft.

    Also, the XFL will host their draft prior to the NFL’s.

  4. Players should be compensated for ANY workout after their college career is over.
    NFL makes enough money to make that happen.

  5. Fortunately it was the meniscus. The minor league of all knee injuries. He will be full speed by June.

  6. The league could easily purchase a blanket insurance policy that covered all 32 teams and the league itself (for the Combine and other open workouts) that guarantees payouts for players injured in this process.

    The cost would be minimal — a mere rounding error’s worth of money off what the league earns every year.

  7. “While players can purchase insurance policies to protect against this type of risk, they shouldn’t have to.”
    —————————

    Um, why not? Are they not the one trying to minimize the risk, and the NFL? Isn’t that how insurance works in the real world?

  8. The team doing the workout should be forced to pay him. If projected 1st round by the advisory board, then that money. All other players, 2nd round money.

    THAT will stop the private workouts.

  9. If scouts, coaches,and GMs can’t tell if a guy can play after watching 3-4 years of college tapes, they need to find another line of work. These dog-and-pony shows are a joke.

  10. I dont get all these workouts. We know Allen, Darnold, Rosen and Mayfield will all be drafted in the top 10. If any of them declined to work out for a team, they wouldny fall out of the top 10. Heck they would still mostly go top 5. Granted there is initial money in the slotting of the first round picks and advantages to being picked earlier. But as you get lower in the draft it becomes less important as to $$$. Some could point out being picked 33 is better then being picked 32.
    Is Tak McKinney any better off then Taco Charlton because he got drafted a couple spots earlier? We refer to these pro days as job interviews. They are not really. They are actually more like placement interviews. They got the job. Its just a matter of where they are “assigned.”
    I don’t know when Tak impressed the Falcons enough to cause them to decide to not only draft him, but to also trade to get him, but I’d hope it was not just his pro day. But if it was, and he didn’t do the pro day, he’d be a Cowboy a couple picks later. Is the risk worth it?

  11. There needs to be some sort of insurance for these guys. Teams/NFL should have enough money to pay for an overall plan that would protect these guys, then maybe some additional fee for each workout, like a grand.

    The insurance should use the physicals at the combine and/or at the team facility as a baseline. The payouts would be difficult in terms of a guy that could go 1st but was projected as a 3rd rounder. Also how much would it take to trigger a payout event, and at what level? A guy who tears his pec might still play this season, yet still have his draft stock potentially lowered.

    Still something should be workable, even if it takes a room of lawyers a couple of weeks to pound it out.

  12. I shouldn’t have to pay for insurance on my car to cover myself in the event the other driver doesn’t have insurance.

    But I’m not an idiot and pay for it anyway.

    I think that’s why they call it “insurance”…

  13. jmc8888 says:

    There needs to be some sort of insurance for these guys. Teams/NFL should have enough money to pay for an overall plan that would protect these guys, then maybe some additional fee for each workout, like a grand.
    ==================================================

    They aren’t NFL employees.

  14. PAUL SOUSA says:
    April 6, 2018 at 11:09 am
    Fortunately it was the meniscus. The minor league of all knee injuries. He will be full speed by June.

    ************************************************************
    It depends on how big the tear is and where it is, meniscus tears are difficult to heal.

  15. tremoluxman says: “If scouts, coaches,and GMs can’t tell if a guy can play after watching 3-4 years of college tapes, they need to find another line of work. These dog-and-pony shows are a joke.”
    —————————

    Shows your lack of knowledge.

    Sean Payton specifically said he put ROTY Kamara on catching drills at their prviate workout because there just wasn’t enough film of it.

    And then there’s players that weren’t asked to do certain things in games(ie college coach try to hide a weakness against an opponent or just wasn’t part of their scheme). Be it out pattern throws for QBs or an LB dropping back into coverage. Private workouts shows if these players are at least capable of doing it.

  16. I think choices are important, a team has a choice to request a private workout, the player has a choice to accept or deny. If he had a great workout and not been injured, it would have helped his draft stock. Every choice comes with a risk… Nick made a choice and the results were unfortunate, however it was his choice to do this not the teams or NFL’s. I hope players start to realize the risks and reject requests if they feel tape covers their talent.

  17. I hate to hear when things like this happen. Hopefully he had a insurance policy to cover him. The good part teams draft injured player all the time so there is some hope for him. It’s hard to turn down private workouts when you have a 3rd or 4th round grade.

  18. That really sucks, but if that knee was going to be injured, it was going to happen, whether in a private workout, training camp, exhibition game, real game or practice. It hurts him financially, and that is for sure.

  19. If Nelson didn’t have insurance while performing for a specific team then I sure hope his agent does. Smacks of a big Errors & Omissions claim against his agent who would have certainly committed an omission if he let his client subject himself to the risks without proper coverage.

    I hope for Nelson’s and his agent’s sake he did have coverage otherwise agent is going to be hearing from Nelson attorney.

  20. “If enough of the top prospects do it, the league will have no choice but to implement meaningful protections.”

    Yup – the league should tell them that if they want protection to buy an insurance policy. Plenty of companies will do it.

    If they choose not to, and refuse to do workouts, they have no one but themselves to blame when their draft stock falls.

    it’s occam’s razor

  21. allsyntax says:
    April 6, 2018 at 11:07 am

    Another opportunity for the XFL. Incoming college players will not be forced or blackballed into performing physical activities prior to the draft.

    Also, the XFL will host their draft prior to the NFL’s.
    ————————

    Lol. You bozos and the XFL. They’ll be lucky to get all of the NFL’s cast-offs.

  22. Yes lets get more lawyers involved that will clear things up…said no one ever.

    Sure a few stars can refuse but most of these guys are just fighting to make a team and they are going to do all they can to impress.

    Why is it that PFT continually pushes against the league for court action? Are you looking for it to fail? Pretty ironic since it pays your bills by having this site.

  23. Maybe college players should just be put in China cabinets for their four years and we can make believe they have talent.

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