Wisconsin’s Nick Nelson tears meniscus while working out for an NFL team

Getty Images

Wisconsin cornerback Nick Nelson worked out for a team in an effort to bolster his draft stock, but he may have hurt his draft stock instead.

Nelson tore his meniscus during a private workout, Ian Rapoport of NFL Network reports. Nelson needs surgery and will be out three or four months.

This week North Carolina State defensive end Kentavius Street tore his ACL while working out for the Giants.

It’s unknown which team Nelson was working out for when he suffered the injury, but injuries like this could happen to any player at any workout, which is why some players hesitate to do private workouts. Last year, for example, Christian McCaffrey told all teams he would not be working out for them. That didn’t hurt his draft stock, as he was still the eighth overall pick in the draft.

Nelson is viewed as more of a mid-round pick, and so he may not feel that he had the leverage to make such a refusal. But it’s something other players should consider. Injuries during private workouts can tank a player’s draft stock.

29 responses to “Wisconsin’s Nick Nelson tears meniscus while working out for an NFL team

  1. You’d think with all the technology players could workout once either at a University pro day or the combine and teams could evaluate the film. Then if they like the kid they fly him in for an interview.

    Just another in a long list of reasons why the draft 1. needs be sooner and 2. needs to be before FA.

  2. Team should be responsible. If they was already union members you can bet your butt they wouldn’t be treated so crappy in the draft process.

  3. His agent should have had an insurance policy in place. If there isn’t someone screwed up badly.

  4. Sucks, that may cost him getting drafted at all. But of 1,000 players thinking/hoping to get drafted it’s going to occassionly happen. Let’s not pretend the same thing can’t happen at the combine or any other time.

  5. This is kind of ridiculous. A kid puts 2-3 years of film together, but that’s not enough. He works out at the combine then he does his pro days, but that’s still enough. He still has to work out for each team he visits. How much information does each team need to determine whether the kid can play or not?

  6. That sucks. My roommate in college had a cup of coffee in the NFL, half of it on the practice squad and he was signed as a UDFA. Nevertheless, he was of course very excited for his opportunity. He was still at our apartment probably around June, after OTAs and rookie mini-camp, and before training camp. I came home from the gym one afternoon, and there he is, with my Brita tank emptied and filled with ice on the living room table, and his foot sunk in it, ankle-deep. I put aside my thoughts of how much bleach i’d need to ever hold drinking water in that tank again, and asked “bruh….you good?” In the most dejected voice I ever heard, he says “I f—-ed the money up, dog….” Turns out he had been working out at the track facility to be in his best shape for camp, tried to do some stunt with hurdles, and ended up spraining his ankle. Fortunately it wasn’t more serious, and fortunately it healed in time for him to make a strong case for himself at camp. But I have a pretty good idea how Nick Nelson is feeling. Best wishes for a full and speedy recovery.

  7. It’s a shame but an injury can happen to a player working out on his own too so don’t agree with blaming teams for having players come in for a workout .

  8. Watch the Pats sign both those guys to cheap contracts, give them a season to heal, then see what they have. Thats a Belichick type move for finding if there are any inexpensive diamonds hidden in the mud.

  9. Teams should carry a much greater risk if they want to work these players out. The teams already have years and years of tape of them plus combine for most of them plus a pro day for every single player.
    I say if any team wants to work a player out these are the rules:
    1. No player who is a top 5 pick may be worked out
    2. Any player who is 6-15 and works out and gets injured gets paid at the #2 draft contract by the workout team.
    3. Any player who is 16-32 and works out gets paid at the 10th contract by the workout team
    4. Any player expected in rounds 2-3 and injured gets paid at the #15 contract.
    5: Any player expected in rounds 4-7 and injured gets paid a flat rate $5 million.

    Rules like these would minimize player risk and finally make it worthwhile for all parties involved.

  10. Kentavius Street tore his ACL while working out for the Giants.

    It’s unknown which team Nelson was working out for when he suffered the injury,…

    If you read the earlier sentence, I’d make an educated guess that he was working out for the Giants.

  11. Aren’t these players mostly ALL college grads with the expected ability to fully assess the risk/reward equation and to choose appropriately?
    The axiom “success has many fathers, failure is an orphan” seems appropriate here. The player makes the decision and should take total responsibility for the outcome.

  12. Living comes with risks. It sucks. But it’s true.

    You’ll never get anywhere without taking a risk. Unless you are born into it, you have to go out and take it. There is a risk involved with that. One simply can’t make life risk proof.

    All we can realistically hope for is a full recovery so he can be healthy enough to risk it all once again so he can live out his dreams.

  13. “Teams should carry a much greater risk if they want to work these players out. The teams already have years and years of tape of them plus combine for most of them plus a pro day for every single player.
    I say if any team wants to work a player out these are the rules:
    1. No player who is a top 5 pick may be worked out
    2. Any player who is 6-15 and works out and gets injured gets paid at the #2 draft contract by the workout team.
    3. Any player who is 16-32 and works out gets paid at the 10th contract by the workout team
    4. Any player expected in rounds 2-3 and injured gets paid at the #15 contract.
    5: Any player expected in rounds 4-7 and injured gets paid a flat rate $5 million.”
    ————————————–
    That sounds good on paper. No one knows who will be drafted where or when, or, if. Who is going to correctly call the position of draft for a player before the draft occurs? If someone could predict the draft position of players into the future, they could also predict who would be a bust or an all pro….before the draft.
    If anyone can do it, there is a GM job waiting for them in the NFL.

  14. “Just another in a long list of reasons why the draft 1. needs be sooner and 2. needs to be before FA.”

    I’m sure the NFLPA would disagree with that idea…strongly. “Let’s let teams draft plenty of cheap, young talent, which will leave plenty of free agents without jobs”. Yeah, no.

  15. arzcardinals says:
    April 6, 2018 at 10:44 am
    Teams should carry a much greater risk if they want to work these players out. The teams already have years and years of tape of them plus combine for most of them plus a pro day for every single player.
    I say if any team wants to work a player out these are the rules:
    1. No player who is a top 5 pick may be worked out
    2. Any player who is 6-15 and works out and gets injured gets paid at the #2 draft contract by the workout team.
    3. Any player who is 16-32 and works out gets paid at the 10th contract by the workout team
    4. Any player expected in rounds 2-3 and injured gets paid at the #15 contract.
    5: Any player expected in rounds 4-7 and injured gets paid a flat rate $5 million.

    Rules like these would minimize player risk and finally make it worthwhile for all parties

    ————-

    How does anyone know which players are “top 5 pick” or where they would actually be drafted before the draft?

    $5M for a guy expected to be drafted in the 7th round?

    Let me guess….you are a millennial?

  16. Got hurt and tore something while working out. Had to be my Ravens, look at their IR history the past 3 years LOL!!!

  17. “ddarrell61 says:
    April 6, 2018 at 10:48 am
    Aren’t these players mostly ALL college grads with the expected ability to fully assess the risk/reward equation and to choose appropriately”

    One, they’re not all college graduates, two, they’re for the most part they’re in their early 20s. 9 times out of 10, an early 20s year old is going to accept the whims of a multi-billion organization dangling a potential multi-million dollar contract in front of them. Remember, these guys don’t get paid AT ALL and then comes to the draft (where they can get paid a lot), with a team asking them to workout for them before said upcoming draft.

    I’m going to switch the subjects here, but to be a bit extreme, if we were to put everything the person then legal definitions like entrapment wouldn’t exist. I’m not saying that this is entrapment at all (it literally can’t be) but to pretend that there isn’t any enticing nature on behalf of the teams, is just dishonest.

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Not a member? Register now!