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Draft needs: Tampa Bay Buccaneers

Vincent Jackson AP

With the NFL Draft approaching, we’re taking a team-by-team look at the needs of each club. Up next is the one with the No. 7 overall selection, the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. The Bucs have six picks overall, missing a fourth from the Darrelle Revis trade (how’s that working out for you?).

Wide receiver: The Bucs were among the league’s most active teams in free agency, but for all their additions, they only subtracted here.

Trading troubled Mike Williams for a sack of beans (Buffalo’s sixth-rounder) was an admission that the new regime had no interest in the past regime’s problems. Though he’s been productive, a new General Manager who didn’t sign him or a coach who didn’t pick him made him expendable after he was stabbed in the leg by his brother.

The Bucs basically have Vincent Jackson and that’s it (though that does put them ahead of the Panthers, one receiver to zero).

It’s hard to imagine Clemson’s Sammy Watkins lasting until they pick, but he’d be a perfect fit. Otherwise, a deep class at the position should have them double-dipping here, if not triple-dipping.

Defensive end: Even after bringing in Michael Johnson in free agency, they need more bodies.

Lovie Smith’s style demands multiple pass-rushers up front, and a solid third option behind Johnson and Adrian Clayborn should be viewed as a necessity rather than a luxury.

With Clayborn being moved to left end, entering a contract year with the team declining to pick up his option, having someone for 2015 and beyond is more important than any immediate concern.

Using the 38th pick on a pass-rusher makes a lot of sense, if they don’t take one in the first.

Guard: The Bucs still can’t be sure when or if Carl Nicks will be back to being Carl Nicks, but they do know they didn’t want to pay Davin Joseph to be Davin Joseph and Donald Penn to be Donald Penn.

The solidified the middle of the line and the edge by signing Evan Dietrich-Smith and Anthony Collins, but there are still plenty of holes.

If the Bucs want to be serious about running the ball (and they will), they’ll need some big boys up front to clear the way for Doug Martin.

Quarterback: Josh McCown is a perfectly adult player, and the Bucs will be just fine if he ends up starting all year.

But he’s not such that they can ignore a long-term answer if one falls into their laps.

Smith has gotten to Super Bowls with serviceable-at-best quarterbacks before, so it’s not as if winning demands a franchise passer.

But it will be interesting to see if they bypass a Johnny Manziel or a Blake Bortles if they slide past the top six.

Cornerback? Actually, it’s not the biggest need on the team. But it is kind of funny that they’re missing a fourth-round pick for the privilege of getting rid of Darrelle Revis.

Alterraun Verner should be a good fit for the physical style Smith demands, and they brought in Mike Jenkins to compete with Johnathan Banks for the other spot.

They will need more depth there, but this isn’t the pressing need they’ve had in the past.

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Draft needs: Atlanta Falcons

Panthers Falcons Football AP

With the NFL Draft approaching, we’re taking a team-by-team look at the needs of each club. Up next is the one with the No. 6 overall selection, the Atlanta Falcons. The Falcons have 10 choices total (with a pair of fourths and three sevenths), so they have some flexibility to make a deal if they need to.

Pass-rusher: Ordinarily we’d say “defensive end” or “linebacker,” but the Falcons aren’t willing to commit to being a 4-3 or a 3-4, so what difference does it make.

What they need is for someone to get after the quarterback with regularity, more than the Osi Umenyioras (a decent 7.5 sacks last year) of the world can provide. They were 29th in the league in sacks last year with 32, and if they can’t get more pressure up front, they’re going to continue to have to play track-meet football to keep up.

The need, coupled with their well-stated willingness to move up, is why they’re linked with players such as Jadeveon Clowney and Khalil Mack. The need for an impact rusher is clear, after they spent the early part of free agency on bulk such as Paul Soliai and Tyson Jackson for what looks like a three-man front.

If they don’t address it in the first round, they can’t wait too long. The need for pressure is glaring, and dipping into the second-round crop of players such as Dee Ford would be about as long as they could wait.

Offensive tackle: The Falcons need to be able to protect quarterback Matt Ryan to have a chance, following their offseason statement of intent about toughness.

That’s why they’re checking out the top tackles such as Greg Robinson and Jake Matthews, as both would add an element of nasty that the Falcons need.

Signing Jon Asamoah early in free agency gave them some flexibility in the middle, but they need another anchor on the edge, even if it means moving Sam Baker to right tackle. Baker’s locked in contractually, but he’s a player they could upgrade, especially if they go this direction with the No. 6 pick.

Otherwise, using a later pick on a player who can challenge for the right tackle job would be possible deeper in the draft, if they decide they can live with Baker on the left.

Safety: The Falcons cut former Pro Bowler Thomas Decoud (who drifted up the road to Carolina), and haven’t done much of significance to replace him.

They need playmaker in the middle of the field to pair with William Moore, preferably one with center field-type range.

The fact they tried to poach RFA Rafael Bush away from the Saints (who matched their offer sheet) indicates they feel the spot is unfilled, and adding some young legs in the back would better allow defensive coordinator Mike Nolan to play his style of defense.

Tight end: It’s hard to say they need to replace Tony Gonzalez, because you just don’t replace a player of his caliber with any draft pick, at least in this draft.

But they do need to diversify their passing game, beyond the progression of Levine Toilolo.

The Falcons are built to be a bit of a finesse team, so adding a quality tight end would help them in ways beyond complementary receivers to Julio Jones and Roddy White.

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Draft needs: Oakland Raiders

Matt Schaub, Greg Olson AP

The Raiders enter 2014 with a more talented roster than a season ago. G.M. Reggie McKenzie used free agency and the trade market to actively address personnel shortcomings, and some short-term on-field gains are quite possible for Oakland.

The Raiders are also positioned to make a splash early in the 2014 draft. They hold the No. 5 overall pick, which gives them some flexibility, especially if they want to trade down in what is regarded as a strong draft. The Raiders have one pick in each of the first four rounds and three seventh-round picks — a decent, but hardly overwhelming stockpile of selections. The Raiders still have quite a few roster holes to fill, and their free agency haul is only a temporary fix. 

Of course, the Raiders could also stay put at No. 5 and take the best available player. After two consecutive 4-12 seasons, the Raiders must show progress under McKenzie and coach Dennis Allen, which likely explains the organization’s free agency spending — and underscores the importance of getting at least one impact rookie out of this draft.

Here is PFT’s assessment of Oakland’s top draft needs:

Quarterback: The Raiders don’t need an immediate starting quarterback out of the draft, but they would hardly be blamed for addressing the position, as they need a long-term solution under center. Ex-Texans starter Matt Schaub, who turns 33 in June, figures to start in 2014. He is signed for two more seasons, which buys the Raiders a little time. Still, Schaub’s 2013 form left much to be desired. Second-year pro Matt McGloin is the top backup and figures to have a spot on the depth chart even if Oakland drafts a passer.

Defensive end: The signings of Justin Tuck (ex-Giants) and LaMarr Woodley (ex-Steelers) bolstered the Raiders’ pass rush, but Tuck is entering his 10th season, and Woodley has missed 14 games in the last three seasons. A young edge player to keep Tuck and Woodley fresh while learning from these skilled, accomplished pass rushers would be a nice addition to the defensive depth chart. Veteran Jason Hunter, one of the regulars at defensive end for Oakland a season ago, remains an unrestricted free agent, so a little more end depth is needed.

Defensive tackle: The Raiders lost 27-year-old defensive tackle Vance Walker in free agency to Kansas City. Ex-Texan Antonio Smith, a better pass rusher than Walker, looks set to replace Walker on the depth chart. Smith has been durable and productive throughout his career, but he turns 33 in October. In the short term, the Raiders could use another capable player inside to back up the starters.

Cornerback: The Raiders added ex-49ers corners Tarell Brown and Carlos Rogers in free agency, but both only signed one-year deals. After drafting a cornerback (D.J. Hayden) in Round One in 2013, the Raiders are probably more likely to select one on the second or third day of the draft this year. Nevertheless, it’s a position that Oakland should continue to address.

Safety: Fun fact: the Raiders got 1,098 defensive snaps from safety Charles Woodson a season ago, per Pro Football Focus data. What’s more, Woodson earned a slightly above-average grade from PFF in 2013. Nevertheless, Woodson will be 38 in October, so adding a young free safety to groom behind Woodson would make a lot of sense.

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Draft needs: Cleveland Browns

Josh Gordon AP

All things considered, the Browns’ draft record isn’t bad as some might expect from a club that hasn’t made the postseason since 2002. The Browns drafted five Pro Bowlers currently on their roster: left tackle Joe Thomas, center Alex Mack, wide receiver Josh Gordon, tight end Jordan Cameron and cornerback Joe Haden.

Nevertheless, there’s no sugar-coating the Browns’ 4-12 record from a season ago. The Browns lost 10 of their final 11 games, and the club’s poor play late in the season cost head coach Rob Chudzinski his job. Later, G.M. Mike Lombardi and CEO Joe Banner left the organization. In the end, the Browns will begin the 2014 draft with new faces at the key decision-making spots of G.M. (Ray Farmer) and coach (Mike Pettine).

The Browns currently hold 10 draft picks, with extra selections in Rounds One and Four (via Indianapolis) and Round Three (via Pittsburgh). All of their picks can be traded, as Cleveland did not receive any compensatory selections. In short, the Browns may have the supply of picks needed to trade up if they covet a prospect. What’s more, their collection of later-round picks could be valuable currency should they look to trade for veteran players in the latter stages of the draft.

Here’s a closer look at the Browns’ draft needs:

Quarterback: The Browns will almost certainly draft a quarterback who will compete to start right off the bat, a la Brandon Weeden two years ago. Brian Hoyer sparked the offense for a short time last season, but he’s coming off an October ACL tear, and his contract is up after the 2014 season. The Browns’ current top backup, Alex Tanney, is untested. The Browns also could add a veteran backup, with Rex Grossman a logical fit.

Cornerback: Drafting a cornerback capable of pushing for a starting spot would bolster the secondary depth. It could allow the Browns to move Buster Skrine inside to the slot, where he’s well-suited. Also, Skrine and star cornerback Haden are free agents after the 2014 season. While the Browns seem likely to keep Haden long term, having as many good options as possible at cornerback is a sensible approach.

Wide receiver: The Browns have added to this position in the offseason, signing Andrew Hawkins from Cincinnati to play the slot and ex-Lions wideout Nate Burleson to push for a starting job outside of Josh Gordon. Nevertheless, the Browns could still use a little more playmaking ability at receiver. Wideout Greg Little, a 41-game starter in the last three seasons, can reach unrestricted free agency after the 2014 season, and he has not been a standout in his time in Cleveland.

Running back: The Browns have struggled to address the RB position via draft since returning to NFL play in 1999. Still, they may have to dive back into the rookie ranks for tailback help this May. We can pencil in ex-Texans back Ben Tate as Cleveland’s starter, and he seems likely to get the majority of the carries. However, the depth behind Tate needs improvement. Ex-Eagles tailback Dion Lewis showed promise last summer but missed the 2013 campaign after breaking his leg. Chris Ogbonnaya is a good utility back — he catches the ball well, and he can play some fullback. However, the Browns lack is a second starter-caliber runner to pair with Tate, who’s had some injury issues in his NFL career.

Tight end: While Cameron had a breakout 2013 season, he is entering the final year of his contract. The Browns have the luxury of being able to draft and stash a project if needed; the club has decent depth behind Cameron, though no major pass catching threats.

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Draft needs: Jacksonville Jaguars

Gus Bradley AP

With the NFL Draft approaching, we’re taking a team-by-team look at the needs of each club. Up next is the one with the No. 3 overall selection, the Jacksonville Jaguars. The Jags have 11 choices overall, giving them a good chance to restock a franchise that is making significant progress.

Quarterback: It’s funny, this was their most pressing need a year ago too, but the new administration realized they couldn’t fill all their holes in one offseason.

Bringing back Chad Henne is fine (after mercifully ending the Blaine Gabbert era/error), but General Manager Dave Caldwell and coach Gus Bradley know they need a long-term answer at the most important position on the field.

It would be nice if that player had the kind of personality that could lift the region, but the important thing is being good at playing football. The Jaguars were close to being respectable the second half of last season, and could make huge strides with the right guy under center.

In many ways, Johnny Manziel makes a lot of sense here, as he has the kind of sizzle the business needs, along with an ability to make plays.

Pass-rusher: The Jaguars did some good business bringing in veteran Chris Clemons and hanging onto Jason Babin, but they still need more help.

They were last in the league with 20 sacks in 2012, and though they got that number up to 31 last year, they were still on the bottom of the league list.

Finding guys to play the “Leo” spot in Gus Bradley’s defense is imperative, and they know they need more than one legitimate sack threat.

If they’re convinced that they can find their quarterback at the top of the second round, using the third pick on a Jadeveon Clowney or a Khalil Mack would be a huge boost for a defense that was moving in the right direction.

Offensive line: Even with the free agent addition of Zane Beadles to play left guard, the Jaguars need more talent up front.

Replacing retired center Brad Meester is a must (and their pursuit of Alex Mack shows how serious they are about it), and they could upgrade at right guard and right tackle easily.

With Luke Joeckel returning to left tackle, they should be solid on that side, but need to give whatever quarterback they add more of a chance.

Bringing in running back Toby Gerhart in free agency tells you they want to run more, but they need to bring in some big bodies if they’re going to be able to implement that plan.

Wide receiver: Cecil Shorts is an emerging player, and you wonder how good he could look with a few competent parts around him in the passing game.

At this point, they have to accept that they’re probably never getting anything from Justin Blackmon (other than headaches), so adding a prime talent would be an intriguing option.

For all the other needs, plugging a player such as Clemson’s Sammy Watkins in the lineup makes them instantly better, and would provide the kind of offensive spark that was missing.

But the draft is deep in receiving talent, so it might make more sense to use their wealth of mid-round picks (they have seven choices in the fourth through sixth rounds) to load up there.

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Draft Needs: St. Louis Rams

Tampa Bay Buccaneers v St. Louis Rams Getty Images

With the NFL Draft approaching, we’re taking a team-by-team look at the needs of each club. Next up is the St. Louis Rams. The Rams have 12 selections overall and two picks in the first 13 selections of the draft thanks to the Robert Griffin III trade. It should give the Rams ample opportunity to fill some of the glaring holes on the roster.

Safety: The Rams invested a third-round pick on T.J. McDonald last season but could still use more help at the safety position. McDonald missed six games due to a broken leg last year and struggled at times to find his footing during his rookie campaign. Fellow starter Rodney McLeod is back as well but also had issues in coverage at times. The Rams’ defense has continued to improve with one of the most potent pass rush tandems in the game in Chris Long and Robert Quinn. Shoring up the back-end of the defense could make the front four even more imposing as well.

Tackle: It feels like the Rams have been in need of upgrading their offensive line for about a decade. This year is no different. Jake Long is still penciled in as the starter at left tackle but he’s also coming back from ACL and MCL tears. St. Louis re-signed Rodger Saffold but the Rams are expected to move him inside the guard. Joe Barksdale started 13 games last season and remains a potential fit at right tackle at least as a fall back option. However, the Rams could use an upgrade at the position.

In addition, Long’s cap number sky-rockets in 2015 and he could be a cap casualty next offseason. Any tackle selected by St. Louis could fill the hole at right tackle this year before potentially replacing Long on the left side next season.

Outside Linebacker: James Laurinaitis and Alec Ogletree have locked down two of the starting jobs at linebacker, but the Rams could use an upgrade at their other starting position. Jo-Lonn Dunbar and Will Witherspoon struggled at times last season in that role. Dunbar remains on the roster but Witherspoon has not been re-signed and remains a free agent. The remaining group of linebackers have very little experience and depth could use upgrading as well.

Cornerback: At the very least, the Rams need to add depth at cornerback. Janoris Jenkins has shown promise in his first two seasons and Trumaine Johnson has been a solid third cornerback. But with the departure of Cortland Finnegan, the Rams need to add another player that can challenge Johnson for the starting job. With just five cornerbacks currently under contract – and one in trouble off the field – St. Louis could add a couple cornerbacks to the roster in the draft.

Wide Receiver: The Rams aren’t lacking in options at receiver. They’ve invested significantly on receivers in the draft as five receivers have been selected in the first four rounds in the last three years: Tavon Austin (1st round, 2013), Stedman Bailey (3rd round, 2013) Austin Pettis (3rd round, 2011), Brian Quick (2nd round, 2012) and Chris Givens (4th round, 2012). They also signed former Tennessee first round pick Kenny Britt this offseason.

Despite all those additions, they are still lacking a true top flight No. 1 option at receiver. However, if they don’t jump on a receiver early that they believe could be that kind of player – perhaps Clemson’s Sammy Watkins or Texas A&M’s Mike Evans – they made decided to stand pat with their current stable of options.

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Draft needs: Houston Texans

Bill O'Brien AP

With the NFL Draft approaching, we’re taking a team-by-team look at the needs of each club. We start with the team with the No. 1 overall selection, the Houston Texans. The Texans have 11 total choices, and with a new coach bringing a new system, they’ll need several of them to contribute right away.

Quarterback: It’s hard to imagine Bill O’Brien would take this job (when he had other options), only to take the financial hit of getting rid of Matt Schaub just so he could start Ryan Fitzpatrick under center.

While his time working with Tom Brady in New England gives us some idea of what he might want in a passer, the reality is there’s a chance for a clean slate here.

When you’re picking first overall, there’s usually a reason for it, and a bit of latitude. There might be local pressure to take Texas A&M’s Johnny Manziel (and it might be the right thing to do), but O’Brien might think the ceiling of Blake Bortles is a bit higher.

The Texans have to take one early, so it really comes down to whether they want to take the best player in the draft first, or use the 33rd pick on a quarterback. There are guys at the top of the second round that teams covet, and the best overall value might be going that route.

Outside linebacker: Yes, about that best player in the draft business.

Jadeveon Clowney might simply be impossible to pass if you have the first pick, no matter who you have to play at quarterback. Unless of course you prefer Khalil Mack, which Texans General Manager Rick Smith reportedly does..

While Clowney’s more of the tradition 4-3 end frame, his pass-rush ability is obvious, and tremendous. Mack’s more of the traditional 3-4 look, but has incredible potential as well.

Taking either would allow them to move Brooks Reed inside next to Brian Cushing, and might allow Whitney Mercilus to take advantage of being ignored on the other side.

Adding an impact player to a defense which already includes J.J. Watt would allow them to be potentially dominant, and that in and of itself would buy a rookie quarterback some time.

Nose tackle: New defensive coordinator Romeo Crennel would love to have a big space-eater in the middle, and there really isn’t one on the roster at the moment. They do have former Chiefs defensive tackle Jerrell Powe (with whom Crennel worked in Kansas City). But if there was a player such as Louis Nix hanging around at No. 33, they’d have to be interested.

Finding a fixture there will require a significant investment, and with their other needs, they might have to make do with a journeyman such as Powe for a year and hope for the best.

Offensive line: The Texans have needs at guard and right tackle, and could stand to add a number of players here for the sake of competition.

Along with depth at running back and the secondary, they have a few spots at which they can concentrate multiple picks.

Since they have five picks in the sixth and seventh rounds, expect them to fling several of those at these spots, to see what sticks.

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Which 2011 first-round picks won’t have the option exercised?

Jake+Locker+Tennessee+Titans+v+Houston+Texans+4hOYVTZ1882l Getty Images

With NFL teams commencing the process of exercising fifth-year options on 2011 first-round picks, the real question becomes which players won’t have the option exercised.

So here’s a look at the candidates for getting the Spalding Smails treatment.

Broncos linebacker Von Miller:  With a six-game suspension last year and a late-season torn ACL, the Broncos possibly would at least consider the possibility of not picking up the option for the second overall pick in 2011.  It nevertheless would be a major surprise if they don’t trigger the option.

49ers linebacker Aldon Smith:  The 49ers reportedly are “very unlikely” to exercise the option on the seventh overall pick, due to multiple off-field issues.  There’s still no downside to using it, since it doesn’t become fully guaranteed until March 2015.  If they’re thinking about trading him, Smith could fetch more in return if his new team controls his rights for two years.

Titans quarterback Jake Locker:  How’s this for an inconsistency?  Locker, the eighth overall pick in 2011, remains on track to be the starter in 2014.  But the Titans aren’t expected to pick up the option.  For the oft-injured Locker, it makes plenty of sense.  Why give an injury-only guarantee to a guy who seemingly has been only injured since he entered the league?  The option for a quarterback taken in the top 10 would by $13 million; that’s more than Locker will make in his first four years, combined.

49ers quarterback Blaine Gabbert:  The right to exercise the option was traded to San Francisco along with Gabbert’s rookie deal as the 10th overall pick.  While they could use a little leverage in their looming negotiations with Colin Kaepernick, the notion of paying Gabbert $13 million in 2015 isn’t leverage.  It’s lunacy.

Vikings quarterback Christian Ponder:  While much cheaper than Locker or Gabbert since Ponder wasn’t taken in the top 10, he’s still on the team only because his salary is low, as veteran quarterbacks go.

Lions defensive tackle Nick Fairley:  The Lions already have said that the option won’t be exercised on Fairley, in order to give him incentive to play hard in 2014.  And if Fairley needs the promise of a long-term contract to play hard, why would the Lions want to give him the security of a long-term contract?

Buccaneers defensive end Adrian Clayborn:  He had 5.5 sacks in 16 starts last year and 7.5 in 16 starts as a rookie.  But we’ve reported that the Buccaneers are doubtful to exercise the option.

Danny Watkins:  The 23rd overall pick in the 2011 draft was waived by the Eagles last year, and his contract went unclaimed.  With that, the ability to exercise the fifth-year option died.  He currently is a free agent.

49ers receiver Jonathan Baldwin:  Amazingly, the 49ers have three players with fifth-year options, and they’ll quite possibly exercise none of them.  Baldwin arrived via trade last year in exchange for 2012 first-round bust A.J. Jenkins.  Baldwin did nothing last year to merit consideration for a fifth year on his rookie deal.

Falcons offensive lineman Gabe Carimi:  His option evaporated after Carimi’s contract went unclaimed via waivers.  He’d been cut by the Buccaneers after being traded to Tampa by Chicago.  The Falcons signed Carimi as a free agent.

Packers tackle Derek Sherrod:  The last pick in round one from 2011 has appeared in 12 games over three seasons, with zero starts.

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2014 NFL Draft visits/workouts

Teddy Bridgewater AP

The following is an unofficial list of conducted or planned predraft meetings, visits and workouts as reported by various teams and media outlets. The list will be updated up until the draft, which will be conducted from May 8-10 in New York.

Workouts are designated by a “W,” while visits are denoted with “V.” In some cases, a player has been linked to a team, but it’s unclear whether the team conducted a workout or a visit.

Arizona Cardinals

Kent State running back Dri Archer. [W]

Memphis safety Lonnie Ballentine. [V]

Boise State wide receiver Geraldo Boldewijn. [V]

Miami (Fla.) tight end Asante Cleveland.

McGill (Quebec) offensive tackle Laurent Duvernay-Tardif. [V]

South Carolina wide receiver Bruce Ellington. [V]

Rice cornerback Phillip Gaines.

Minnesota defensive tackle Ra’Shede Hageman.

Michigan State defensive tackle Tyler Hoover. [W]

Shepherd (W.V.) defensive end Howard Jones. [V]

Purdue offensive tackle Kevin Pamphile. [V]

Colorado State center Weston Richburg. [V]

TCU cornerback Jason Verrett. [V]

Bloomsburg (Pa.) defensive end Larry Webster. [V]

Atlanta Falcons

Liberty defensive back Walt Aikens. [W]

Texas Tech tight end Jace Amaro. (VW)

UCLA outside linebacker Anthony Barr. [V]

Oklahoma State quarterback Clint Chelf [W].

Alabama safety Ha Ha Clinton-Dix. [V]

South Carolina defensive end Jadeveon Clowney. [V]

Oregon State defensive end Scott Crichton. [W]

UCLA wide receiver Shaq Evans. [W]

Iowa tight end C.J. Fiedorowicz. [V]

Auburn defensive end/outside linebacker Dee Ford. [V]

Florida State running back Devonta Freeman. [V]

Virginia Tech cornerback Kyle Fuller. [W]

SMU quarterback Garrett Gilbert. [W]

Minnesota defensive tackle Ra’Shede Hageman.

Texas defensive end Jackson Jeffcoat. [W]

UCF running back Storm Johnson. [V]

Boise State defensive end Demarcus Lawrence.

Buffalo linebacker Khalil Mack. [V]

Texas A&M offensive tackle Jake Matthews. [V]

Auburn offensive tackle Greg Robinson. [V]

Notre Dame linebacker Prince Shembo.

Montana linebacker Jordan Tripp. [V]

Georgia State offensive tackle John Ulrich.

BYU linebacker Kyle Van Noy.

TCU cornerback Jason Verrett. [V]

Towson running back Terrance West. [W]

UCLA linebacker Jordan Zumwalt. [W]

Baltimore Ravens

Florida State wide receiver Kelvin Benjamin. [V]

Clemson wide receiver Martavis Bryant. [V]

Washington State safety Deone Bucannon. [V]

Alabama safety Ha Ha Clinton-Dix.

North Carolina tight end Eric Ebron. [V]

California linebacker Khairi Fortt. [V]

Eastern Illinois quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo. [V]

Indiana wide receiver Cody Latimer. [W]

USC wide receiver Marqise Lee. [V]

Maryland cornerback Dexter McDougle. [W]

Utah cornerback Keith McGill. [V]

Oregon cornerback Terrance Mitchell.

Alabama linebacker C.J. Mosley. [V]

BYU linebacker Kyle Van Noy. [V]

Northern Illinois safety Jimmie Ward. [V]

Ball State quarterback Keith Wenning. [V]

Buffalo Bills

Liberty cornerback Walt Aikens.

LSU wide receiver Odell Beckham. [V]

Clemson defensive back Bashaud Breeland. [V]

Louisville linebacker Preston Brown. [V]

Cumberlands (Ky.) running back Terrance Cobb. [V]

Duke cornerback Ross Cockrell. [V]

Oregon State defensive end Scott Crichton. [V]

McGill (Quebec) offensive tackle Laurent Duvernay-Tardif. [V]

North Carolina tight end Eric Ebron. [V]

Virginia Tech cornerback Kyle Fuller. [W]

Rice cornerback Phillip Gaines. [V]

LSU running back Jeremy Hill. [V]

Ohio State running back Carlos Hyde. [V]

Indiana wide receiver Cory Latimer. [V]

Cansisus basketball player Chris Manhertz. [W]

Texas A&M offensive tackle Jake Matthews. [V]

Notre Dame tight end Troy Niklas. [V]

Ohio State cornerback Bradley Roby. [V]

Baylor running back Lache Seastrunk. [V]

Washington tight end Ausin Seferian-Jenkins. [V]

Ohio State linebacker Ryan Shazier. [V]

Mississippi State offensive lineman Charles Siddoway. [V]

Clemson wide receiver Sammy Watkins. [V]

Towson running back Terrance West. [V]

Carolina Panthers

LSU wide receiver Odell Beckham. [W]

Alabama safety Ha Ha Clinton-Dix. [V]

Oregon State wide receiver Brandin Cooks. [V]

Oregon State defensive end Scott Crichton. [W]

North Carolina tight end Eric Ebron. [V]

SMU quarterback Garrett Gilbert. [W]

LSU wide receiver Jarvis Landry. [W]

Indiana wide receiver Cory Latimer.

USC wide receiver Marqise Lee. [V]

USC center Marcus Martin.

Miami (Fla.) quarterback Stephen Morris. [V]

Wyoming quarterback Brett Smith. [V]

North Dakota State offensive tackle Billy Turner.

TCU cornerback Jason Verrett. [W]

Bloomsburg (Pa.) defensive end Larry Webster. [W]

Chicago Bears

Alabama safety Ha Ha Clinton-Dix. [V]

Lindenwood cornerback Pierre Decir.

Virginia Tech cornerback Kyle Fuller. [V]

Northern Illinois quarterback Jordan Lynch. (local prospect workout)

Notre Dame defensive tackle Louis Nix. [V]

Louisville safety Calvin Pryor. [V]

Notre Dame quarterback Tommy Rees.

Arizona State defensive tackle Will Sutton. [V]

Oregon running back De’Anthony Thomas. [V]

Wisconsin running back James White. [W]

Cincinnati Bengals

LSU wide receiver Odell Beckham. [V]

Michigan State cornerback Darqueze Dennard. [V]

Marist defensive end Terrence Fede. [V]

Virginia Tech cornerback Kyle Fuller. [V]

Rice cornerback Phillip Gaines. [W]

LSU running back Jeremy Hill. [V]

Miami (Fla.) wide receiver Allen Hurns. [W]

Louisville safety Calvin Pryor. [V]

TCU cornerback Jason Verrett. [W]

Cleveland Browns

UCF quarterback Blake Bortles. [W]

Louisville quarterback Teddy Bridgewater.

Fresno State quarterback Derek Carr. [W]

McGill (Quebec) offensive tackle Laurent Duvernay-Tardif. [V]

Eastern Illinois quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo. [W]

Florida offensive guard Jon Halapio. [W]

Buffalo linebacker Khalil Mack.

Texas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel. (VW)

Alabama quarterback A.J. McCarron. [W]

Miami (Fla.) quarterback Stephen Morris. [V]

Georgia quarterback Aaron Murray. [V]

Alabama wide receiver Kevin Norwood. [W]

Missouri defensive end Michael Sam.

Pittsburgh quarterback Tom Savage.

Dallas Cowboys

Liberty defensive back Walt Aikens. [W]

UCLA linebacker Anthony Barr. [V]

Southeast Louisiana State defensive tackle Jerrod Black. [V]

West Virginia defensive end Will Clarke. [V]

Arizona State defensive end Davon Coleman. [V]

Oregon State defensive end Scott Crichton. [V]

Northwest Missouri cornerback Brandon Dixon. [V]

Pittsburgh defensive tackle Aaron Donald. [V]

Missouri defensive lineman Kony Ealy. [V]

Florida defensive tackle Dominique Easley. [V]

Iowa tight end C.J. Fiedorowicz. [W]

Oregon wide receiver Josh Huff. [V]

Florida State defensive tackle Timmy Jernigan. [V]

Shepherd (WV) defensive end Howard Jones. (VW)

Florida State cornerback Lamarcus Joyner. [V]

Boise State defensive end Demarcus Lawrence. [V]

Ohio State linebacker Ryan Shazier. [V]

North Dakota State offensive tackle Billy Turner. [V]

Northern Illinois strong safety Jimmie Ward. [V]

(According to the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Baylor guard Cyril Richardson, SMU quarterback Garrett Gilbert and a host of other local products worked out for Dallas on Thursday.)

Denver Broncos

Oregon State defensive end Scott Crichton. [V]

Virginia Tech cornerback Kyle Fuller. [V]

Mississippi wide receiver Donte Moncrief. [W]

Miami (Fla.) quarterback Stephen Morris. [V]

Boise State center Matt Paradis. [V]

Miami (Fla.) basketball forward Erik Swoope. [W]

Detroit Lions

Mississippi State defensive end Denico Autry. [V]

LSU wide receiver Kadron Boone. [W]

Pittsburg State wide receiver John Brown.

Alabama safety Ha Ha Clinton-Dix. [V]

South Carolina defensive end Jadeveon Clowney.

LSU fullback J.C. Copeland. [W]

Texas wide receiver Mike Davis. [W]

Michigan State cornerback Darqueze Dennard. [W]

North Carolina tight end Eric Ebron. [V]

Iowa tight end C.J. Fiedorowicz. [V]

Boston College kicker Nate Freese.

Virginia Tech cornerback Kyle Fuller. [V]

Indiana wide receiver Cory Latimer. [V]

USC wide receiver Marqise Lee. [V]

Maryland cornerback Dexter McDougle. [V]

LSU quarterback Zach Mettenberger.

Georgia quarterback Aaron Murray.

Washington tight end Austin Seferian-Jenkins. [V]

Clemson wide receiver Sammy Watkins. [V]

Bloomsburg (Pa.) defensive end Larry Webster. [W]

Green Bay Packers

West Texas A&M wide receiver Torrence Allen.

Virginia center Luke Bowanko. [V]

Michigan State linebacker Max Bullough.

McGill (Quebec) offensive tackle Laurent Duvernay-Tardif. [V]

San Jose State quarterback David Fales. [V]

North Dakota State quarterback Brock Jensen. [V]

Missouri defensive end Michael Sam.

Notre Dame linebacker Prince Shembo.

Middle Tennessee State defensive lineman Jimmy Staten.

Ball State quarterback Keith Wenning. [V]

Houston Texans

Memphis safety Lonnie Ballentine. [V]

UCF quarterback Blake Bortles. [V]

Louisville quarterback Teddy Bridgewater. [V]

South Carolina defensive end/linebacker Jadeveon Clowney. [V]

Iowa tight end C.J. Fiedorowicz. [W]

Eastern Illinois quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo.

Miami (Fla.) wide receiver Allen Hurns. [W]

Buffalo linebacker Khalil Mack. [V]

Texas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel. [V]

Texas A&M offensive tackle Jake Matthews. [V]

Auburn offensive tackle Greg Robinson. [V]

South Carolina defensive end Chaz Sutton.

Indianapolis Colts

Fresno State wide receiver Davante Adams.

Kent State running back Dri Archer. [W]

Washington State safety Deone Bucannon. [V]

Virginia Tech cornerback Kyle Fuller. [V]

Ball State cornerback Jeff Garrett. (VW)

Minnesota defensive tackle Ra’Shede Hageman.

Florida offensive guard Jon Halapio. [W]

Texas defensive end Jackson Jeffcoat. [W]

Fresno State tight end Marcel Jensen.

Oregon cornerback Terrance Mitchell. [W]

Middle Tennessee State offensive lineman Josh Walker. (VW)

Per Colts.com, 20 local prospects worked out for Indianapolis on April 16.

(A hat tip to ColtsAuthority.com for first linking to some of the published reports of visits referenced here.)

Jacksonville Jaguars

UCLA linebacker Anthony Barr.

Northern Illinois defensive tackle Ken Bishop. [V]

UCF quarterback Blake Bortles.

Louisville quarterback Teddy Bridgewater. [VW]

Fresno State quarterback Derek Carr.

South Carolina defensive end/linebacker Jadeveon Clowney.

Texas A&M wide receiver Mike Evans. [V]

Rice cornerback Phillip Gaines.

Eastern Illinois quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo. [V]

LSU running back Jeremy Hill. [V]

Texas defensive end Jackson Jeffcoat. [W]

Buffalo linebacker Khalil Mack. [V]

Texas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel. [V]

Alabama quarterback A.J. McCarron.

LSU quarterback Zach Mettenberger.

Auburn offensive tackle Greg Robinson. [V]

Notre Dame linebacker Prince Shembo.

Notre Dame defensive lineman Stephon Tuitt. [V]

BYU linebacker Kyle Van Noy. [V]

Clemson wide receiver Sammy Watkins.

Kansas City Chiefs

Memphis safety Lonnie Ballentine. [V]

McGill (Quebec) offensive tackle Laurent Duvernay-Tardif. [V]

Virginia-Lynchburg cornerback Keith Lewis. [W]

Louisville running back Senorise Perry. [V]

Middle Tennessee State defensive lineman Jimmy Staten.

Illinois State defensive end Colton Underwood. [V]

Miami Dolphins

Kent State running back Dri Archer. [W]

Northern Illinois defensive tackle Ken Bishop. [W]

McGill (Quebec) offensive tackle Laurent Duvernay-Tardif. [V]

Marist defensive end Terrence Fede. [V]

Florida State running back Devonta Freeman. [W]

Rice cornerback Phillip Gaines.

Florida offensive guard Jon Halapio. [W]

Miami (Fla.) offensive tackle Seantrel Henderson. (VW)

Wyoming wide receiver Robert Herron.

Nebraska guard Spencer Long. [V]

Monmouth tight end Mike McLafferty. [W]

Georgia quarterback Aaron Murray.

Purdue offensive tackle Kevin Pamphile. [V]

Marshall offensive tackle Garrett Scott. [V]

North Dakota State offensive tackle Billy Turner.

Minnesota Vikings

UCLA outside linebacker Anthony Barr. [V]

Louisville quarterback Teddy Bridgewater. (VW)

Louisville linebacker Preston Brown. [V]

Washington State safety Deone Bucannon. [V]

Eastern Illinois quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo. [W]

Boise State defensive end Demarcus Lawrence. [V]

Buffalo linebacker Khalil Mack. [V]

LSU quarterback Zach Mettenberger. [V]

North Dakota State offensive tackle Billy Turner. [V]

Minnesota safety Brock Vereen. [V]

Ball State quarterback Keith Wenning. [V]

Towson running back Terrance West. [V]

New England Patriots

Liberty defensive back Walt Aikens. [W]

Kent State running back Dri Archer. [W]

Memphis safety Lonnie Ballentine. [W]

Boise State wide receiver Geraldo Boldewijn. [W]

Louisville quarterback Teddy Bridgewater. [V]

Washington State safety Deone Bucannon. [V]

Virginia Tech wide receiver D.J. Coles.

Oregon State wide receiver Brandin Cooks. [V]

Oregon State defensive end Scott Crichton. [W]

South Carolina wide receiver Bruce Ellington. [V]

Iowa tight end C.J. Fiedorowicz. [V]

Auburn outside linebacker Dee Ford.

Florida State running back Devonta Freeman. [V]

USC wide receiver Marqise Lee. [V]

Texas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel. [V]

LSU quarterback Zach Mettenberger. [V]

Georgia quarterback Aaron Murray.

Purdue offensive tackle Kevin Pamphile. [V]

Boise State center Matt Paradis. (VW)

Colorado State center Weston Richburg. [W]

Notre Dame linebacker Prince Shembo.

Washington wide receiver Kevin Smith. [V]

Middle Tennessee State defensive lineman Jimmy Staten.

Virginia Tech quarterback Logan Thomas.

Notre Dame defensive lineman Stephon Tuitt. [V]

Illinois State defensive end Colton Underwood. [W]

New Orleans Saints

Oklahoma cornerback Aaron Colvin. [V]

Lindenwood cornerback Pierre Decir. [V]

Central Arkansas tight end Chase Dixon.

Oklahoma State cornerback Justin Gilbert. [V]

Baylor cornerback Demetri Goodson. [V]

Wyoming wide receiver Robert Herron. [V]

Boise State defensive end Demarcus Lawrence. [VW]

USC wide receiver Marqise Lee. [V]

USC center Marcus Martin.

Purdue offensive tackle Kevin Pamphile. [V]

Louisville safety Calvin Pryor. [V]

Ohio State cornerback Bradley Roby. [V]

Wofford outside linebacker Alvin Scioneaux. [W]

Clemson offensive lineman Brandon Thomas.(VW)

Middle Tennessee State offensive lineman Josh Walker. (VW)

New York Giants

Washington State safety Deone Bucannon. [V]

Boston College linebacker Steele Divitto. [W]

Marist defensive end Terrence Fede. [W]

Rice cornerback Phillip Gaines.

Virginia-Lynchburg cornerback Keith Lewis. [W]

Maryland cornerback Dexter McDougle. [V]

Monmouth tight end Mike McLafferty. [W]

Purdue offensive tackle Kevin Pamphile. [V]

Colorado State center Weston Richburg. [W]

Bloomsburg (Pa.) defensive end Larry Webster. [V]

New York Jets

Texas Tech tight end Jace Amaro. [V]

LSU wide receiver Odell Beckham. [V]

Florida State wide receiver Kelvin Benjamin. [V]

Washington State safety Deone Bucannon. [V]

Oregon State wide receiver Brandin Cooks. [V]

Michigan State cornerback Darqueze Dennard. [V]

Texas A&M wide receiver Mike Evans. [V]

Marist defensive end Terrence Fede. [W]

Iowa tight end C.J. Fiedorowicz. [V]

Virginia Tech cornerback Kyle Fuller. [V]

Oklahoma State cornerback Justin Gilbert. [V]

Boise State defensive end/outside linebacker Demarcus Lawrence. [V]

Maryland cornerback Dexter McDougle. [V]

Louisville safety Calvin Pryor. [V]

Ohio State cornerback Bradley Roby. [V]

TCU cornerback Jason Verrett. [V]

Bloomsburg (Pa.) defensive end Larry Webster. [V]

Oakland Raiders

Northern Illinois defensive tackle Ken Bishop. [V]

UCF quarterback Blake Bortles.

Clemson defensive back Bashaud Breeland. [V]

Fresno State quarterback Derek Carr.

South Carolina defensive end Jadeveon Clowney. [V]

Arkansas defensive end Austin Flynn. [W]

Virginia Tech cornerback Kyle Fuller. [V]

Michigan State defensive tackle Tyler Hoover. [W]

Indiana wide receiver Cory Latimer. [V]

Virginia-Lynchburg cornerback Keith Lewis. [V]

Texas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel. [V]

Maryland cornerback Dexter McDougle. [V]

LSU quarterback Zach Mettenberger. [V]

Oregon cornerback Terrance Mitchell. [W]

Concordia (Minn.) defensive end Zach Moore. [V]

Pittsburgh quarterback Tom Savage.

South Carolina defensive end Chaz Sutton.

Philadelphia Eagles

UCLA outside linebacker Anthony Barr. [V]

Florida State wide receiver Kelvin Benjamin. [V]

Washington State cornerback Deone Bucannon.

Miami (Fla.) tight end Asante Cleveland.

Rutgers wide receiver Brandon Coleman. [W]

Oklahoma defensive back Aaron Colvin. [V]

McGill (Quebec) offensive tackle Laurent Duvernay-Tardif. [V]

Oregon defensive tackle Taylor Hart.

Connecticut defensive end Jesse Joseph.

Indiana wide receiver Cory Latimer. [V]

USC wide receiver Marqise Lee. [V]

Nebraska guard Spencer Long. [V]

USC center Marcus Martin.

Rutgers wide receiver Quron Pratt.[W]

Montana linebacker Jordan Tripp. [V]

Florida defensive back Jaylen Watkins. [V]

Bloomsburg (Pa.) defensive end Larry Webster. [V]

(A hat tip to PhillyMag.com’s Eagles Pre-Draft Prospect Tracker, where we located news of a few visits.)

Pittsburgh Steelers

UCLA outside linebacker Anthony Barr. [V]

LSU wide receiver Odell Beckham.

Massachusetts tight end Rob Blanchflower. [V]

Arizona State linebacker Carl Bradford. [V]

Washington State linebacker Deone Bucannon. [V]

Oregon State defensive end Scott Crichton. [V]

Michigan State cornerback Darqueze Dennard. [V]

South Carolina wide receiver Bruce Ellington. [V]

Virginia Tech cornerback Kyle Fuller. [V]

Rice cornerback Phillip Gaines. [V]

Minnesota defensive lineman Ra’Shede Hageman. [V]

Texas defensive end Jackson Jeffcoat. [V]

Boise State defensive end/outside linebacker Demarcus Lawrence. [V]

Mississippi wide receiver Dante Moncrief. [V]

Boston College linebacker Kevin Pierre-Louis. [V]

Louisville safety Calvin Pryor. [V]

Arizona cornerback Shaquille Richardson. [V]

Ohio State cornerback Bradley Roby. [V]

Baylor running back Lache Seastrunk. [V]

Ohio State linebacker Ryan Shazier. [V]

Notre Dame defensive lineman Stephon Tuitt. [V]

Minnesota safety Brock Vereen. [V]

TCU cornerback Jason Verrett. [V]

UCLA linebacker Jordan Zumwalt. [V]

San Diego Chargers

Montana linebacker Brock Coyle. [V]

Oregon State defensive end Scott Crichton. [V]

Stanford defensive end Ben Gardner.

New Mexico offensive lineman Darryl Johnston.

Indiana wide receiver Cory Latimer. [V]

Nebraska guard Spencer Long. [V]

Ohio State cornerback Bradley Roby. [V]

Middle Tennessee State defensive lineman Jimmy Staten.

Boise State defensive tackle Ricky Tjong-A-Tjoe. [V]

Illinois State defensive end Colton Underwood. [V]

Bloomsburg (Pa.) defensive end Larry Webster. (VW)

San Francisco 49ers

LSU wide receiver Odell Beckham.

Clemson defensive back Bashaud Breeland.

Clemson wide receiver Martavis Bryant. [V]

Oklahoma cornerback Aaron Colvin. [V]

Eastern Illinois quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo.

UCF running back Storm Johnson. [V]

Boise State outside linebacker Demarcus Lawrence. [V]

Boston College offensive lineman Matt Patchan. [V]

Towson running back Terrance West. [V]

Georgia State wide receiver Albert Wilson. [V]

Seattle Seahawks

Oregon State wide receiver Brandin Cooks. [V]

Montana linebacker Brock Coyle. [V]

McGill (Quebec) offensive tackle Laurent Duvernay-Tardif. [V]

Indiana wide receiver Cory Latimer. [V]

Boise State defensive end/outside linebacker Demarcus Lawrence. [W]

Washington wide receiver Kevin Smith. [V]

Georgia State offensive tackle John Ulrich.

Towson running back Terrance West. [V]

St. Louis Rams

South Carolina defensive end Jadeveon Clowney. [V]

Michigan State cornerback Darqueze Dennard. [V]

Missouri defensive end Kony Ealy. [V]

South Carolina wide receiver Bruce Ellington. [V]

Virginia Tech cornerback Kyle Fuller. [W]

SMU quarterback Garrett Gilbert. [V]

Buffalo linebacker Khalil Mack. [V]

Texas A&M offensive tackle Jake Matthews. [W]

Georgia quarterback Aaron Murray.

Auburn offensive tackle Greg Robinson. [V]

Pittsburgh quarterback Tom Savage. [V]

North Dakota State offensive tackle Billy Turner. [V]

Clemson wide receiver Sammy Watkins. (VW)

Tampa Bay Buccaneers

Louisville quarterback Teddy Bridgewater. [V]

Fresno State quarterback Derek Carr. [V]

Iowa tight end C.J. Fiedorowicz. [V]

Auburn outside linebacker Dee Ford.

Virginia Tech cornerback Kyle Fuller. [W]

Rice cornerback Phillip Gaines. [W].

Eastern Illinois quarterback Jimmy Garoppolo. [V]

SMU quarterback Garrett Gilbert. [W]

Florida offensive guard Jon Halapio. [W]

Texas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel. [V]

Purdue offensive tackle Kevin Pamphile. [V]

North Dakota State offensive tackle Billy Turner.

Bloomsburg (Pa.) defensive end Larry Webster. [V]

(The Buccaneers also worked out 26 local prospects on April 11, the club said on its website.)

Tennessee Titans

UCLA linebacker Anthony Barr.

Colorado State linebacker Shaquil Barrett.

Alabama safety Ha Ha Clinton-Dix. [V]

Virginia Tech cornerback Kyle Fuller. [W]

LSU running back Jeremy Hill. [V]

Tennessee offensive tackle Ja’Wuan James.

Florida State defensive tackle Timmy Jernigan.

LSU quarterback Zach Mettenberger. [W]

Alabama linebacker C.J. Mosley.

Georgia quarterback Aaron Murray.

Louisville safety Calvin Pryor. [V]

Ohio State cornerback Bradley Roby. [V]

Tennessee offensive lineman James Stone.

Towson running back Terrance West. [V]

Washington Redskins

Oregon State defensive end Scott Crichton. [V]

Stanford offensive tackle Cameron Fleming. [V]

Indiana wide receiver Cory Latimer. [V]

Boise State defensive end/outside linebacker Demarcus Lawrence. [V]

West Virginia running back Charles Sims. [V]

Louisville defensive end Marcus Smith. [V]

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2014 NFL preseason schedule

Ryan Tannehill AP

Here is the 2014 NFL preseason schedule as furnished by the league on April 9. Exact dates and times for some games have not yet been announced:

NFL Hall of Fame Game: Sunday, August 3.

N.Y. Giants vs. Buffalo (NBC).

Week One: Thursday, August 7 through Sunday, August 10.

Buffalo at Carolina.

Cincinnati at Kansas City.

Cleveland at Detroit.

Dallas at San Diego.

Green Bay at Tennessee.

Houston at Arizona.

Indianapolis at N.Y. Jets.

Miami at Atlanta.

New England at Washington.

New Orleans at St. Louis.

Oakland at Minnesota.

Philadelphia at Chicago.

Pittsburgh at N.Y. Giants.

San Francisco at Baltimore.

Seattle at Denver.

Tampa Bay at Jacksonville.

Week Two: Thursday, August 14 through Monday, August 18.

Jacksonville at Chicago (ESPN, 8/14).

Kansas City at Carolina (FOX, 8/17).

Cleveland at Washington (ESPN, 8/18).

Arizona at Minnesota.

Atlanta at Houston.

Baltimore at Dallas.

Buffalo at Pittsburgh.

Denver at San Francisco.

Detroit at Oakland.

Green Bay at St. Louis.

Miami at Tampa Bay.

N.Y. Giants at Indianapolis.

N.Y. Jets at Cincinnati.

Philadelphia at New England.

San Diego at Seattle.

Tennessee at New Orleans.

Week Three: Thursday, August 21 through Sunday, August 24.

Oakland at Green Bay (CBS, 8/22).

New Orleans at Indianapolis (CBS, 8/23).

San Diego at San Francisco (FOX, 8/24).

Cincinnati at Arizona (NBC, 8/24).

Pittsburgh at Philadelphia.

Jacksonville at Detroit.

Tennessee at Atlanta.

Chicago at Seattle.

Tampa Bay at Buffalo.

Dallas at Miami.

Carolina at New England.

N.Y. Giants at N.Y. Jets.

Washington at Baltimore.

St. Louis at Cleveland.

Houston at Denver.

Minnesota at Kansas City.

Week Four: Thursday, August 28. ***

Arizona at San Diego.

Atlanta at Jacksonville.

Baltimore at New Orleans.

Carolina at Pittsburgh.

Chicago at Cleveland.

Denver at Dallas.

Detroit at Buffalo.

Indianapolis at Cincinnati.

Kansas City at Green Bay.

Minnesota at Tennessee.

New England at N.Y. Giants.

N.Y. Jets at Philadelphia.

San Francisco at Houston.

Seattle at Oakland.

St. Louis at Miami.

Washington at Tampa Bay.

*** — According to the NFL, teams can elect to play the final preseason game on Friday, August 29.

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Post-free agency mock draft

Clowney AP

Before free agency, we posted a mock draft.  Because when in Rome.

Now that free agency is nearly four weeks old, which has resulted in needs being filled and new needs being created, we’ve put together a new mock draft.

Because when in Rome.

So here’s how we see things, 31 days before it’ll be time to say, “When in New York City.”

1. Texans: Jadeveon Clowney, defensive end, South Carolina.

Yeah, Bortles.  Yeah, Manziel.  But the Texans lucked into J.J. Watt when a pair of teams from their own division took Jake Locker and Blaine Gabbert three years ago.  That lesson should not be lost on the Texans.  Especially with Jacksonville on the clock two picks later.

2. Rams: Sammy Watkins, receiver, Clemson.

If they’re going to stick with Sam Bradford at quarterback, they need to give him another weapon.  The fact that they seem to be downplaying it serves only to make it more likely.

3. Jaguars:  Johnny Manziel, quarterback, Texas A&M.

The flirtation with center Alex Mack suggests that the Jags are willing to take chances.  Manziel fits with Jedd Fisch’s creative offensive approach and, more importantly, Manziel will make the Jaguars into a marquee team.  If he’s successful.  If he’s not, they’ll get another crack at another quarterback soon enough.

4. Browns:  Derek Carr, quarterback, Fresno State.

Should Carr go that high?  No.  Should the Browns screw around if they think they’ve found the guy who can run Kyle Shanahan’s offense the way Shanahan wants?  Hell no.

5. Raiders: Greg Robinson, tackle, Auburn.

Yes, they signed Donald Penn to presumably play left tackle.  But they’ll find a spot for both guys as they try to open running lanes and keep Matt Schaub in one piece.

6. Falcons: Khalil Mack, linebacker, Buffalo.

The pass rush remains an area of need after free agency.  It would be a surprise if the Falcons use the No. 6 pick on any other position.

7. Buccaneers: Mike Evans, receiver Texas A&M.

Dumping Mike Williams makes receiver an obvious need.  Maybe too obvious; they could get leapfrogged for Evans.

8. Vikings: Blake Bortles, quarterback, Central Florida.

With Matt Cassel in place for two years, Bortles gets eased in to the job, possibly becoming offensive coordinator Norv Turner’s next star pupil.

9. Bills: Jake Matthews, tackle, Texas A&M.

Regarded a year ago to be better than Luke Joeckel, he’ll help beef up an offensive line that has underperformed in recent years.

10. Lions: Aaron Donald, defensive tackle, Pitt.

Receiver becomes less of a need with Golden Tate in the fold.  With the Lions not exercising the fifth-year option on Nick Fairley as a motivational tool and with Ndamukong Suh still carrying a $22 million-plus cap number, they need a fresh face at the position.

11. Titans: Teddy Bridgewater, quarterback, Louisville.

The Titans have done a good job of keeping their cards close to the vest regarding the need for a quarterback.  As May approaches, it’s becoming more obvious that they need to take a chance on someone, three years after they took a chance on Jake Locker.

12. Giants: Timmy Jernigan, defensive tackle, Florida State.

Given the departures of Justin Tuck and Linval Joseph, the Giants need to restore some bite to a defensive line that didn’t necessarily carry them to a pair of Super Bowl appearances, but helped deliver victory once they got there.

13. Rams: Ha-Ha Clinton-Dix, safety, Alabama.

Keeping Rodger Saffold allows the Rams to address the last line of defense.

14. Bears: Bears:  C.J. Mosley, linebacker, Alabama.

Veteran D.J. Williams got the first chance to assume the middle linebacker mantle in Chicago.  The Bears should now turn to a rookie.

15. Steelers: Marqise Lee, receiver, USC.

With Mike Wallace, Emmanuel Sanders, and Jerricho Cotchery all gone, the Steelers provide Antonio Brown a young partner and Big Ben another target.

16. Cowboys: Dee Ford, defensive end, Auburn.

With Anthony Spencer likely gone and DeMarcus Ware definitely gone, it’s time to stock up on pass rushers.

17. Ravens: Taylor Lewan, tackle, Michigan.

Eugene Monroe stayed, Michael Oher didn’t. They need a right tackle, and Lewan could be the guy to take over there.

18. Jets: Eric Ebron, tight end, North Carolina.

And here’s why the Jets ultimately didn’t pursue DeSean Jackson.  Ebron could become a game-changer in the slot — and he has the charisma to take over the nation’s top media market.

19. Dolphins: Xavier Su’a-Filo, guard, UCLA.

Or they could re-sign Richie Incognito.

20. Cardinals: Anthony Barr, linebacker, UCLA.

If the Cards are going to keep up with the 49ers, Seahawks, and Rams, the Cards need pass rushers.

21. Packers: Jason Verrett, cornerback, TCU.

The cornerback slide stops in Green Bay, where the defense needs plenty of impact players.

22. Eagles: Justin Gilbert, cornerback, Oklahoma State.

And it’s suddenly a run on corners, with the Eagles beefing up a potential weak spot.

23. Chiefs: Bradley Roby, cornerback, Ohio State.

Let’s make it three corners in a row, with Roby joining a team that has to deal with Peyton Manning and Philip Rivers.

24. Bengals: Ryan Shazier, LB, Ohio State.

Shazier ran a blazing 4.36-second 40-yard dash with a bad hamstring. Adding him would require some shuffling of the linebackers, since Shazier is suited to the weak side. Given his talents and Vontaze Burfict’s versatility, that’s a good problem to have.

25. Chargers: Brandin Cooks, receiver, Oregon State.

He says he’s better than DeSean Jackson.  The weapons-challenged Philip Rivers will settle for just as good.

26. Browns (from Colts): Trai Turner, guard, LSU.

A surprisingly meat-and-potatoes offseason continues for a team that has lost guard Shawn Lauvao and could lose center Alex Mack, this year or maybe next year.

27. Saints: Odell Beckham, receiver, LSU.

The stable of weapons gets replenished, partially. Jimmy Graham still needs an explanation.  And a contract.

28. Panthers: Darqueze Dennard, cornerback, Michigan State.

They can get competent receivers later, in rounds where top-shelf corners aren’t likely lurking.

29. Patriots: Zack Martin, tackle, Notre Dame.

It’s not a glaring area of need but it’s good value for the slot.  Plus, it never hurts to have enough guys to keep Tom Brady healthy in the final years of his career.

30. 49ers: Kyle Fuller, cornerback, Virginia Tech.

The lone area of weakness on the team gets addressed.  As it should.

31. Broncos: Cyrus Kouandjio, tackle, Alabama.

All those additions on defense won’t help Peyton Manning score more than eight points if he faces the Seahawks again in the Super Bowl.

32. Seahawks: Kony Ealy, defensive end, Missouri.

With Chris Clemons and Red Bryant gone and Jared Allen picking the Bears, the Seahawks need to feed the unit that was critical to the team’s success in 2013.

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2014 NFL offseason workout schedule

Russell Wilson, Marshawn Lynch AP

Below is the schedule of offseason workouts for all 32 clubs as released by NFL on April 3. The schedule is subject to change:

Arizona Cardinals
First Day: April 21.
OTA Offseason Workouts: May 20-22, May 27-29, June 2-5.
Mandatory Minicamp: June 10-12.

Atlanta Falcons
First Day: April 21.
OTA Offseason Workouts: May 27-29, June 2-4, June 10-13.
Mandatory Minicamp: June 17-19.

Baltimore Ravens
First Day: April 21.
OTA Offseason Workouts: May 28-30, June 3-5, June 9-10, June 12-13.
Mandatory Minicamp: June 17-19.

Buffalo Bills
First Day: April 22.
OTA Offseason Workouts: May 28-30, June 2, June 4-5, June 9-12.
Mandatory Minicamp: June 17-19.

Carolina Panthers
First Day: April 21
OTA Offseason Workouts: May 27-29, June 3-5, June 9-12.
Mandatory Minicamp: June 17-19.

Chicago Bears
First Day: April 22.
OTA Offseason Workouts: May 27-28, May 30, June 2-3, June 5, June 9-12.
Mandatory Minicamp: June 17-19.

Cincinnati Bengals
First Day: April 21.
OTA Offseason Workouts: May 27-29, June 3-5, June 16-18.
Mandatory Minicamp: June 10-12.

Cleveland Browns
First Day: April 7.
OTA Offseason Workouts: May 20-21, May 23, May 27-28, May 30, June 2-3, June 5-6.
Voluntary Minicamp: April 29-May 1.
Mandatory Minicamp: June 10-12.

Dallas Cowboys
First Day: April 21.
OTA Offseason Workouts: May 27-29, June 2, June 4-5, June 9-12.
Mandatory Minicamp: June 17-19.

Denver Broncos
First Day: April 21.
OTA Offseason Workouts: May 28-30, June 2-4, June 16-19.
Mandatory Minicamp: June 10-12.

Detroit Lions
First Day: April 7.
OTA Offseason Workouts: May 20-22, May 27-29, June 2-5.
Voluntary Minicamp: April 22-24.
Mandatory Minicamp: June 10-12.

Green Bay Packers
First Day: April 22.
OTA Offseason Workouts: May 28-30, June 3-5, June 10-13.
Mandatory Minicamp: June 17-19.

Houston Texans
First Day: April 7.
OTA Offseason Workouts: May 27-29, June 2-3, June 5, June 9-10, June 12-13.
Voluntary Minicamp: May 6-8.
Mandatory Minicamp: June 17-19.

Indianapolis Colts
First Day: April 21.
OTA Offseason Workouts: May 27-29, June 2-4, June 9-12.
Mandatory Minicamp: June 17-19.

Jacksonville Jaguars
First Day: April 21.
OTA Offseason Workouts: May 27-29, June 2-3, June 5, June 9-10, June 12-13.
Mandatory Minicamp: June 17-19.

Kansas City Chiefs
First Day: April 21.
OTA Offseason Workouts: May 27-29, June 3-5, June 10-13.
Mandatory Minicamp: June 17-19.

Miami Dolphins
First Day: April 21.
OTA Offseason Workouts: May 27-28, May 30, June 2-3, June 5, June 9-12.
Mandatory Minicamp: June 17-19.

Minnesota Vikings
First Day: April 7.
OTA Offseason Workouts: May 28-30, June 3-5, June 9-12.
Voluntary Minicamp: April 29-May 1.
Mandatory Minicamp: June 17-19.

New England Patriots
First Day: April 21.
OTA Offseason Workouts: May 27, May 29-30, June 2-3, June 5, June 9-10, June 12-13.
Mandatory Minicamp: June 17-19

New Orleans Saints
First Day: April 21.
OTA Offseason Workouts: May 27-29, June 3-5, June 16-19.
Mandatory Minicamp: June 10-12.

New York Giants
First Day: April 21.
OTA Offseason Workouts: May 28-30, June 2-3, June 5, June 9-10, June 12-13.
Mandatory Minicamp: June 17-19.

New York Jets
First Day: April 21.
OTA Offseason Workouts: May 27-28, May 30, June 2, June 4-5, June 9-12.
Mandatory Minicamp: June 17-19.

Oakland Raiders
First Day: April 22.
OTA Offseason Workouts: May 27-28, May 30, June 2-3, June 5, June 9-12.
Mandatory Minicamp: June 17-19.

Philadelphia Eagles
First Day: April 21.
OTA Offseason Workouts: May 27-29, June 2-3, June 5, June 9-12.
Mandatory Minicamp: June 17-19.

Pittsburgh Steelers
First Day: April 22.
OTA Offseason Workouts: May 27-29, June 3-5, June 9-12.
Mandatory Minicamp: June 17-19

St. Louis Rams
First Day: April 21.
OTA Offseason Workouts: June 3, June 5-6, June 9-10, June 12, June 16-17, June 19-20.
Mandatory Minicamp: None.

San Diego Chargers
First Day: April 22.
OTA Offseason Workouts: May 27-29, June 2-4, June 9-12.
Mandatory Minicamp: June 17-19.

San Francisco 49ers
First Day: April 21.
OTA Offseason Workouts: May 27-29, June 2-3, June 5, June 9-10, June 12-13.
Mandatory Minicamp: June 17-19.

Seattle Seahawks
First Day: April 21.
OTA Offseason Workouts: May 27-29, June 2-3, June 5, June 9-12.
Mandatory Minicamp: June 17-19.

Tampa Bay Buccaneers
First Day: April 7.
OTA Offseason Workouts: May 20-22, May 27-29, June 2-5.
Voluntary Minicamp: April 22-24.
Mandatory Minicamp: June 10-12.

Tennessee Titans
First Day: April 7.
OTA Offseason Workouts: May 27-29, June 2-3, June 5, June 9-12.
Voluntary Minicamp: April 29-May 1.
Mandatory Minicamp: June 17-19.

Washington Redskins
First Day: April 7.
OTA Offseason Workouts: May 27-29, June 2-4, June 9-12.
Voluntary Minicamp: April 29-May 1.
Mandatory Minicamp: June 17-19.

All schedule information furnished by the NFL.

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Five rules changes get NFL owners’ approval at league meeting

Rich McCay AP

The NFL’s owners voted to change five NFL rules, while also voting down three proposals and tabling five proposals until next year. Here are the results of the votes on rules changes, bylaw changes and resolution changes brought forward by the NFL Competition Committee:

Rule change proposals:

1. Move the kickoff to the 40-yard line. FAILED

2. Expand instant replay to include personal foul penalties. FAILED

3. Eliminate overtime in the preseason. TABLED

4. Extend the uprights to make them five feet taller. PASSED

5. Move the line of scrimmage for one-point extra point kicks to the defensive team’s 25-yard line. Two-point conversion attempts would still be snapped from the 2-yard line. TABLED. (League will experiment with longer extra points in the preseason.)

6. Put six cameras on all boundary lines — sideline, goal line, end line, to guarantee coverage for replay reviews. TABLED

7. Permit a coach to challenge any official’s decision, except scoring plays which are automatically reviewed. FAILED

8. Protect players from getting the sides of their legs rolled up on — the rule already says a blocker can’t hit an opponent in the back of the legs, this proposal will add “or side” to the rule. PASSED

9. Allow the referee to consult with members of the NFL officiating department during replay reviews. The referee would be able to speak with the command center in New York to help in reviewing a play. PASSED

10. Re-organize the rules about what can be reviewed and what cannot be reviewed, including making the recovery of a loose ball in the field of play reviewable. (This is referred to as the NaVorro Bowman rule, after a controversial call in the NFC Championship Game.) PASSED

11. Don’t stop the clock on a sack. PASSED

12. Modify pass interference so that it can be called within one yard of the line of scrimmage. TABLED

13. Enforce defensive fouls behind the line of scrimmage from the previous spot, rather than from the end of the run or from the spot of the foul. PASSED

Bylaw proposals:

1. Raise the number of active players on game day from 46 to 49 for regular-season games played on a day other than Sunday or Monday, excluding Week One. TABLED

2. Raise the practice squad limit from eight players to 10 players. TABLED

3. Permit clubs to trade players prior to the start of the league year. TABLED

4. Eliminate the cut-down to 75 players during training camp and instead just have one cut-down from 90 players to 53 players. FAILED

5. Permit more than one player to return to the active list from injured reserve so that any player on injured reserve could return after six weeks. FAILED

6. Permit each club to time and test up to 10 draft-eligible players at its facility, and allow any club that wishes to attend timing and testing at another team’s facility. TABLED

7. Adjust the time of the roster reduction from 53 after the fourth preseason game from 6 p.m. Eastern to 4 p.m. Eastern. All teams would have to have their list of final cuts in by 4 p.m. PASSED

Resolution proposal:

1. Permit a home team with a retractable roof to open or close its roof at halftime, instead of having to determine at the start of the game whether it is open or closed. TABLED

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2014 NFL compensatory draft picks by team

Ed Reed AP

The NFL has awarded the following 32 compensatory selections for the 2014 draft:

Ravens (4 picks): Round Three (99), Round Four (134), Round Four (138), Round Five (175).

Jets (4 picks): Round Four (137), Round Six (209), Round Six (210), Round Six (213).

Steelers (3 picks): Round Three (97), Round Five (173), Round Six (215).

Texans (3 picks): Round Four (135), Round Six (211), Round Seven (256).

Falcons (3 picks): Round Four (139), Round Seven (253), Round Seven (255).

Rams (3 picks): Round Six (214), Round Seven (249), Round Seven (250)

Cowboys (3 picks): Round Seven (248), Round Seven (251), Round Seven (254).

Packers (2 picks): Round Three (98), Round Five (176).

Lions (2 picks): Round Four (133), Round Four (136).

Bengals (2 picks): Round Six (212), Round Seven (252).

49ers (1 pick): Round Three (100).

Patriots (1 pick): Round Four (140).

Giants (1 pick): Round Five (174).

Compensatory selections are awarded to clubs for free agent losses sustained in the previous offseason.

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Competition Committee announces new rule, bylaw proposals

kickoff Getty Images

The NFL Competition Committee announced 13 new rule proposals, seven new bylaw proposals and one proposed resolution on a conference call on Wednesday. The NFL’s owners will vote at next week’s league meeting on the potential changes, which we detail below.

Rule change proposals:

1. Move the kickoff to the 40-yard line.

2. Expand instant replay to include personal foul penalties.

3. Eliminate overtime in the preseason.

4. Extend the goal posts an additional five feet above the cross bar.

5. Move the line of scrimmage for one-point extra point kicks to the defensive team’s 25-yard line. Two-point conversion attempts would still be snapped from the 2-yard line.

6. Put six cameras on all boundary lines — sideline, goal line, end line, to guarantee coverage for replay reviews.

7. Permit a coach to challenge any official’s decision, except scoring plays which are automatically reviewed.

8. Protect players from getting the sides of their legs rolled up on — the rule already says a blocker can’t hit an opponent in the back of the legs, this proposal will add “or side” to the rule.

9. Allow the referee to consult with members of the NFL officiating department during replay reviews. The referee would be able to speak with the command center in New York to help in reviewing a play.

10. Re-organize the rules about what can be reviewed and what cannot be reviewed, including making the recovery of a loose ball in the field of play reviewable. (This is referred to as the NaVorro Bowman rule, after a controversial call in the NFC Championship Game.)

11. Don’t stop the clock on a sack.

12. Modify pass interference so that it can be called within one yard of the line of scrimmage.

13. Enforce defensive fouls behind the line of scrimmage from the previous spot, rather than from the end of the run or from the spot of the foul.

Bylaw proposals:

1. Raise the number of active players on game day from 46 to 49 for regular-season games played on a day other than Sunday or Monday, excluding Week One.

2. Raise the practice squad limit from eight players to 10 players.

3. Permit clubs to trade players prior to the start of the league year.

4. Eliminate the cut-down to 75 players during training camp and instead just have one cut-down from 90 players to 53 players.

5. Permit more than one player to return to the active list from injured reserve so that any player on injured reserve could return after six weeks.

6. Permit each club to time and test up to 10 draft-eligible players at its facility, and allow any club that wishes to attend timing and testing at another team’s facility.

7. Adjust the time of the roster reduction from 53 after the fourth preseason game from 6 p.m. Eastern to 4 p.m. Eastern. All teams would have to have their list of final cuts in by 4 p.m.

Resolution proposal:

1. Permit a home team with a retractable roof to open or close its roof at halftime, instead of having to determine at the start of the game whether it is open or closed.

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