SANTONIO HOLMES: "IF I CONTINUED DOWN THAT PATH . . . ."

Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Santonio Holmes revealed that he sold drugs while growing up in Belle Glade, Fla., discussing his past during several interviews at the Super Bowl.
Holmes said he hoped by relating how he moved on from that time in his life to earn a scholarship to Ohio State and become a first-round draft pick that he can demonstrate to young people that there are choices in life besides crime.
“If I continued down that path, I wouldn’t be here,” Holmes told reporters. “I’ve only told three or four people maybe throughout my lifetime about that, and at the moment I felt like it was time to share things.
“I’m on the biggest stage, everybody’s going to be watching. I’m pretty sure some kids can get a feel for changing their lives and not doing those type of things, and can get an opportunity to get out of the ghetto, the ‘hood, to be successful.”
Holmes said that some family members and friends sold drugs, attracting him to the fast-buck lifestyle. He never specified what type of drugs he sold, but recounted that he would leave school to go sell drugs and avoided detection by his mother.
Holmes added that he didn’t need the money for food or other essentials, but would use it for shoes and other things he wanted.
“My friends were always doing it and I felt comfortable doing it at the time,” Holmes said. “As the years grew older, I just felt like that wasn’t what I wanted to do. I wanted to play football. I don’t want to end up like a lot of my friends, in jail, standing on the corner, not going to school.”
Said Steelers offensive tackle Willie Colon: “I don’t think it’s right to sell drugs at all. At the same time, when you look around and your brother’s hungry and you’ve got holes in your shoes and your mother’s working four of five jobs? You’re going to do something. He’s here in Tampa Bay playing in the Super Bowl. That’s the story y’all should be writing.”
Although Holmes stopped selling drugs a long time ago, he apparently isn’t done with them completely. He was deactivated by Steelers coach Mike Tomlin for an October game against the New York Giants after being busted in Pittsburgh with a misdemeanor possession of marijuana charge.
Holmes emphasized that the incident doesn’t signify a return to his past even though, in a way, it does show that he still has some maturing to do.
“It happens, being in the wrong place at the wrong time, not being responsible, being around people that aren’t responsible enough to respect what  do,” Holmes said. “I knew what my path was like before, and I didn’t want to go down that path again.”
“I’ve never failed a drug test in my life, so I wasn’t too concerned. Most of the guys were frustrated at the fact I didn’t play, but they all understand and respect the decision Coach Tomlin made. I deserved it.” 
In the playoffs, Holmes has caught six passes for 99 yards and a touchdown and returned a punt for a score.

27 responses to “SANTONIO HOLMES: "IF I CONTINUED DOWN THAT PATH . . . ."

  1. What a crock…gee, another brother that had a tough time growing up because he was high all the time…let’s see now…he’ll get pulled over for being high or drunk, get popped, get a lawyer, get out of it, apologize…sound familiar?

  2. Nice to see Holmes was helping the kids by buying the weed from them so they could support their families…

  3. Lucky bastard. I sold drugs as a kid too… I had to join the Army to turn my life around.

  4. Once a turd always a turd. Santurdio will smoke, drink, snort his way out of the NFL before he can retire. The guy has the character of a used piece of toilet paper.

  5. Holy shit, that seems like poor judgment letting that cat out of the bag. Hope that doesn’t come back to bite him.
    Oh, by the way, Florio, you Steeler hater.

  6. “Holmes added that he didn’t need the money for food or other essentials”
    then
    “At the same time, when you look around and your brother’s hungry and you’ve got holes in your shoes and your mother’s working four of five jobs? You’re going to do something. He’s here in Tampa Bay playing in the Super Bowl. That’s the story y’all should be writing”
    Mr. Colon should work on his critical listening skills.

  7. Was he even given a drug test when he got busted? Isn’t there an automatic 4 game suspension for a violation of the NFL’s substance abuse policy?

  8. Good for you Santonio.
    Now, please don’t repeat the same mistakes other players make, and that’s being a hypocrite. With all due respect, and I do respect where you are coming from, the hardest part starts now..
    That’s backing up your word with actions that last.
    It’s all about character from now on.
    Best wishes.

  9. Why do they alway blame the people around them. He got pulled over and they found weed. What does that have to do with anyone else? Just be real Santone!

  10. I think the first point to consider is that Ohio State was a great choice for him. He didn’t even have to give up his hobby/livelihood to join the team. Secondly, I think its important to remember that Holmes is a really crappy wideout. He was a first round pick, and he really doesn’t bring anything to the table that Patrick Crayton or Bobby Wade doesn’t bring. He is worth about 3 catches a game for 40 yards. Ho hum. Typical apathetic pothead.

  11. ppdoc says:
    January 29th, 2009 at 8:39 am
    Once a turd always a turd. Santurdio will smoke, drink, snort his way out of the NFL before he can retire. The guy has the character of a used piece of toilet paper.
    _______________________________
    Says the guy who’s hero ALLLLLLLLEGEDLY murdered someone.
    Who’s running back was convicted of distributing coke but they taught him a lesson. They didn’t resign him 2 years later when they thought was old and broken down.
    You should hurry home before someone shows up with a box of Nerds.

  12. You guys have a really vengeful and puritanical attitude towards drug use. I’m glad I don’t live in the states, even if that means I get shitty cable and can watch less football.

  13. Sounds like the wrong place to be at the wrong time is being a passenger in Santonios car when he gets pulled over. To honor his life-changing commitment to not getting caught with drugs he’ll have to blame someone.

  14. @ mrmagoo again – btw – since i know you know this but are too thick to say it…. Ray was NEVER accused of murder. No one EVER placed a weapon in his hand. Accounts from people outside the fight said that he tried to play peacemaker. His stupidity was in being around bad people and then not wanting to rat out his friends (which may be looked at in more than one way.) So stop with the crap about alleged murder. It isn’t true. You know and so does everyone else.

  15. >>ppdoc says:
    January 29th, 2009 at 10:40 am
    @ mrmagoo again – btw – since i know you know this but are too thick to say it…. Ray was NEVER accused of murder. No one EVER placed a weapon in his hand. Accounts from people outside the fight said that he tried to play peacemaker. His stupidity was in being around bad people and then not wanting to rat out his friends (which may be looked at in more than one way.) So stop with the crap about alleged murder. It isn’t true. You know and so does everyone else.<<
    Actually he was accused of murder. From wikipedia:
    “Despite his accomplishments on the field, Lewis’ public image was tarnished following a Super Bowl party on January 31, 2000. Following the party, a fight broke out and Jacinth Baker, 21, and Richard Lollar, 24, died from stab wounds. Lewis and two companions, Reginald Oakley and Joseph Sweeting, were brought to an Atlanta police station for questioning. Eleven days later, along with Oakley and Sweeting, Lewis was indicted for murder and aggravated assault.”

  16. “If I continued down that path, I wouldn’t be here,”
    He’s right. He would have been a Cowboy.

  17. ppdoc says:
    January 29th, 2009 at 10:40 am
    @ mrmagoo again – btw – since i know you know this but are too thick to say it…. Ray was NEVER accused of murder. No one EVER placed a weapon in his hand. Accounts from people outside the fight said that he tried to play peacemaker. His stupidity was in being around bad people and then not wanting to rat out his friends (which may be looked at in more than one way.) So stop with the crap about alleged murder. It isn’t true. You know and so does everyone else.
    _______________________________
    Just blowing a kiss to you in your glass house, big guy. So why did he spend all that time in the pokey and what caused the memory loss in those in those witnesses?
    You apparently don’t understand the practical application of Pavlov’s theories. I just rang your bell and you just salivated. As in you need a bib.

  18. ppdoc-
    only because I had an extra 30 seconds in my life:
    http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/football/nfl/features/bloody_monday/news/2000/02/25/part1/
    http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/football/nfl/news/2000/01/31/lewis_murder_ap/
    http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9903E3D81731F93BA25755C0A9669C8B63&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss
    The Google will tell you many things.
    Ray was accused, indicted and stood trial. Differing versions of events were told on the stand vs. what was told to police leading to the indictment. As worked up as you get about the Steelers ‘tainted’ title, please apply that same critical, conspiracy-seeking intellect at this particular set of circumstances and tell me what you find to be the more reasonable deduction.

  19. Since PFT decided not to put up my first response to you let me try again mrmagoo. I have never made excuses for Jamal Lewis. He was wrong, he did his time, he was suspended and since then he has been clean.
    What happened to Ray had more to do with an overzealous prosecuting atty than what he did. They saw a rich well known black man and went for the kill. Only problem was that Ray wasn’t the one doing the killing. You know it, but won’t admit it.
    What Holmes did was sell drugs, presumably to young men. The dissolution of the black nuclear family is in no small part to the explosion of drugs in our society of the last 20 years. Santonio Holmes is a lousy person. He was in trouble at OSU, he was picked up for smoking dope in the last year. He hasn’t shown any reason for anyone to believe that he is a credit to mankind. Say what you want about Ray Lewis, and maybe it is all marketing, but that guy has worked like hell to rehabilitate his image. His charitible organzation has done remarkable things.
    I realize that you are a Squealer fan and you’re not allowed to say anything bad about your gods, but face it. Santonio Holmes is a creep. Ray was stupid in doing what he did. At least he’s tried to make ammends. Jamal served his time and since then has been clean. But he deserved to go to jail. He did go to jail. And now he belongs to the Clowns.
    All of this is wasted on you and Frank and Captain Fantastic. Don’t think too hard. Your gods will be displeased.
    Hey PFT – lets not censor this one please.

  20. ppdoc-
    Let me get this straight. Santonio is now the reason for the breakdown of the black nuclear family? The lengths you will go to defend an undefendable position are ridiculous. Let’s put this in perspective…
    it’s not like Santonio killed anyone or anything 😉
    I seem to recall you being the one that sailed in here with your Baltimore inferiority complex pissing on all things Steelers. As an FYI– find one time I defended Santonio for what he did. I’d challenge you to do the same for Frank and Captain Fantastic though they are certainly capable of defending themselves. You’ll have to pardon me for chuckling at the hubris of you trying to assail the character of a Steelers player that were caught smoking dope when you have a guy who was indicted for murder as the face of your franchise. Self-awareness and a sense of irony are definitely not strong suits of yours. Dude, I don’t even care if you hate the Steelers… hell you’re supposed to. But talking this kind of crap and accusing someone of blindly following a team when you don’t know what you’re talking about AGAIN gets tedious.

  21. http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/football/nfl/news/2000/06/04/lewis_agreement/
    since you all want to quote articles, how about this one…
    “Prosecutors presented little proof that the Baltimore Ravens linebacker assaulted anyone during a Jan. 31 street fight that left two men dead.
    “It seems like the prosecution is starting to run out of gas, and it doesn’t seem like they had much in the tank in the first place,” said Irwin R. Kramer, a defense attorney from suburban Baltimore who is following the case.
    Without much direct evidence linking Lewis to the stabbings of Richard Lollar and Jacinth Baker, prosecutors are trying to convince the jury that Lewis participated in a conspiracy to cover up the crime.
    But that’s not what he is charged with. Lewis and two friends, Sweeting and Oakley, are facing only the more serious charges of murder, felony murder and aggravated assault.
    “There’s no evidence of guilt here,” said Samuel. “So all of the post-conduct circumstances are irrelevant.”

  22. @44-6-andthenRomofainted
    Funny, a real crappy wide out. Compared to all those stellar players on the Eagles…

  23. When did this become the optometrist & urologist show? Perhaps you two could just go hug it out.
    I just wanted to point out the quality of character that is admitted to tOSU. I bet Tressel’s graduation rate is just tremendous. It shows that if a “big-time” recruit gets out of the state of Florida there is obviously something we don’t know.

  24. ppdoc says:
    January 29th, 2009 at 1:31 pm
    http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/football/nfl/news/2000/06/04/lewis_agreement/
    since you all want to quote articles, how about this one…
    “Prosecutors presented little proof that the Baltimore Ravens linebacker assaulted anyone during a Jan. 31 street fight that left two men dead.
    “It seems like the prosecution is starting to run out of gas, and it doesn’t seem like they had much in the tank in the first place,” said Irwin R. Kramer, a defense attorney from suburban Baltimore who is following the case.
    Without much direct evidence linking Lewis to the stabbings of Richard Lollar and Jacinth Baker, prosecutors are trying to convince the jury that Lewis participated in a conspiracy to cover up the crime.
    But that’s not what he is charged with. Lewis and two friends, Sweeting and Oakley, are facing only the more serious charges of murder, felony murder and aggravated assault.
    “There’s no evidence of guilt here,” said Samuel. “So all of the post-conduct circumstances are irrelevant.”
    _________________________________________
    Can I play cherry pick a quote too?
    The last one is from Ray-Ray’s DEFENSE ATTORNEY. Was he supposed to “I got that guilty mofo off”?
    Let’s try a couple from your article:
    Duane Fassett, the driver of Lewis’ rented limousine, reluctantly admitted on the stand that after the brawl Lewis told everyone in the stretch Lincoln Navigator to “just keep your mouth shut and don’t say nothing.”
    Evelyn Sparks, who was riding in the limousine, said she saw another passenger dump a white hotel laundry bag into a garbage bin outside a fast food restaurant. Prosecutors say the bag contained Lewis’ bloodstained white suit, which has never been found.
    Sparks also said a photograph of Lewis’ entourage, taken at the Cobalt Lounge on the night of the killings, was destroyed by Jessica Robertson, a woman described as Lewis’ girlfriend. “She said she burned it,” Sparks testified.
    —Seriously, stop spinning it. I don’t even care other than the fact it takes incredible hypocrisy for you deify Ray while cracking on a guy who smoked and sold dope.

  25. I’m surprised Florio’s headline didn’t read
    “Drug Dealer on Dan Rooney’s Payroll”

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