Stallworth Suspended Indefinitely

NFL spokesman Brian McCarthy has announced, via Twitter, that Commissioner Roger Goodell has suspended Browns receiver Donte’ Stallworth indefinitely, without pay, in the wake of Tuesday’s guilty plea to felony DUI manslaughter.
Per McCarthy, Goodell said that Stallworth has “caused irreparable harm to the victim and his family, your club, your fellow players and the NFL.”
Stallworth has been sentenced to 30 days of jail time and two years of house arrest/controlled custody.
It’s possible that, like Falcons quarterback Mike Vick, Stallworth will remain on indefinite suspension until his full and complete term ends, including house arrest.

52 responses to “Stallworth Suspended Indefinitely

  1. I wish people would stop using Twitter. It is not a news site!!! It is a blog site for losers to tell people who (for some reason) care what they are doing everysecond of their lives. How about reporting news to a news agencies station, paper or website. TWITTER SUCKS!!!!

  2. I think this is a big mistake on the NFL’s part.
    The only reason to prevent a player from participating in the NFL is if you think it’s in the player’s best interest (say, drug rehab), it’s required to maintain the integrity of the game (again, drug rehab), or if the player has done something so heinous, you are protecting the game’s image.
    Stallworth doesn’t meet any of these criteria, in my opinion. He made a life-changing and life-ending mistake, drinking and driving. But the pedestrian he killed was breaking the law, and was crossing a street where (at night), you would not expect him to be and you might not even be able to see him until it’s too late.
    Stallworth is paying a very big price. In addition to the 30-day sentence and two years of house arrest (a very big deal – he cant leave his house except to go to work), he has lost his privilege to drive a car for the rest of his life.
    The criminal justice system is penalizing him, in a way it finds appropriate, and some of those punishments are pretty stiff.
    I think that should be the end of it. Americans understand that people screw up, and what we ask for most is for them to take accountability for it (Stallworth has – he pleaded guilty relatively quickly, and he paid recompense to the victim’s family), and to be punished for it (clearly he’s being punished). He did the crime, he’s going to do his time, but in the meanwhile, he should be playing and earning an income this fall. Not a lot of fans, in my estimation, would be booing him.

  3. Sounds about right. I can see it now. Here comes realitypolice to rail against such arbitrary, heavy-handed tactics by the NFL office.

  4. Stallworth seems like a good guy, he made a horrible mistake and oit cost a man his life though. The court system in Florida, in my opinion failed it’s citizens and because Stallworth is a Pro football player with millions of dollars they gave him a slap on the wrist, then kissed it to ‘make it better’.
    The fact still remains that he killed a man through the stupidity of his own actions and decisions. If Goodell does the right thing here, this suspension will become a lifetime ban, or at least last the full 4 years that he should have gotten in prison had the Florida justice system not failed so horribly.
    Again, Stallworth seems like a good guy but there must be a payment for the crime. I applaud Goodell for taking this step and hope that this doesn’t turn into something like a 4 or 8 game suspension when all is said and done.

  5. At least Goodell is dishing out more punishment than the lame ass prosecutors in Florida.
    Keep him suspended for the full 2 years, that way Stallworth wont have a reason to “go to work” and can keep himself in his house and off the streets.

  6. Crap, I almost forgot… I am leaving this post. Whaaaaaaaaaaaahhhhhhh!

  7. >>>>>
    Per McCarthy, Goodell said that Stallworth has “caused irreparable harm to the victim and his family, your club, your fellow players and the NFL.”
    >>>>>
    And now so has Roger Goodell. Did king Roger ever consider that Stallworth has settled with the victim’s family for millions of dollars and that Stallworth has to actually earn those millions in order to pay the family?

  8. If Roger Goodell wants to “stay consistent”, Donte Stallworth should not be able to play until he has completed ALL conditions relating to this case just like Vick has had to deal with. That includes “house arrest” or whatever they are calling it.
    Maybe Vick can hook him up with a construction job.

  9. I support a suspension, but I fail to see why it is indefinite, unless NFL security has dirt on Stallworth that hasn’t been made public. An indefinite suspension seems like a cop-out designed to deflect criticism of the league until this incident is out of the headlines. Couldn’t Goodell easily suspend him for the length of the “controlled custody” with a provision to extend it if he doesn’t meet certain requirements?

  10. I agree with Goodell here, we can’t alter what the punishment the courts handed out, so at least you have to protect the league from further damage by at least appearing to try and make up for a overly lenient punishment.
    The biggest problem here is the family that was satisfied with the payment from Stallworth, and what would have happened if it was a Joe-Schmoe earning $35,000 a year who could not compensate them in the same way?…he would probably go to trial and serve a much stiffer sentence.
    The NFL cannot appear to be ok with money talking in the justice system, even though there are plenty of other cases, this one has been given an especially bright light when put in contrast with Vick.

  11. Where’s Jared Allen’s indefinite suspension? It’s not Stallworth’s fault that someone ran across the road. He didn’t drive on the sidewalk. He didn’t torture anyone. I hate drunk drivers, one almost killed my mom once, but Stallworth shouldn’t be held responsible for a moron running out into traffic.

  12. Irregardless of the justice bought through the legal system I feel that Goodell’s penalty is fair and just in this case. If this were an average citizen and not a wealthy a NFL player, Donte Stallworth would have been found guilty and given the maximum 15 year sentence. Nice guy or not, Stallworth deserves every punishment he gets for speeding,driving drunk well over the legal limit in FL and taking a man’s life because of his irresponsible actions.

  13. Okay, okay. He’s a fine fellow. He acknowledged his part in the killing–yes, that’s as fair a word as any to describe the result–and I dont know what the magnitude of the settlement with the family is. But so what? It’s his responsibility because it was his actions that caused this story to exist. HE, not the NFL, not Roger G., needs to “fix” this.
    Come on folks; do you remember the one about “your actions have consequences”?

  14. TheHube says:
    I think this is a big mistake on the NFL’s part.
    The only reason to prevent a player from participating in the NFL is if you think it’s in the player’s best interest (say, drug rehab), it’s required to maintain the integrity of the game (again, drug rehab), or if the player has done something so heinous, you are protecting the game’s image.
    Stallworth doesn’t meet any of these criteria, in my opinion. He made a life-changing and life-ending mistake, drinking and driving.
    Are you serious! Killing someone isn’t heinous enough for you. Let me in on a fact drinking and driving isn’t a mistake it is a decision that one makes. I’m not even going to attempt to say that I haven’t made the same stupid decision more than once I have. I also was fortunate enough not to have killed anyone during my stupidity. next it’s not really house arrest if you have followed up on reports after the initial articles. It’ more like community arrest or some wording close to that according to his agent. Finally I can’t believe you would try to abstain the man of guilt because the person he killed was not in the crosswalk. The real crime here is the justice system playing to the wealthy and the guys family accepting the payoff. Yes he admitted his guil but don’t even try to sell that he is paying his debt to society. I guess in your mind if you have enough cash you can kill someone as long as you pay the family off for your “mistake”.

  15. Can’t believe the bozos that think he should not be suspended, you guys ARE the problem in this country, dirtbags like this should not be paid insane amounts of money while under freaking house arrest, period.

  16. Not sure how long the suspension will be, but considering that Goodell has indicated he will factor in whether not Vick has shown genuine remorse for his crime, Stallworth’s suspension should be somewhat shorter. The guy acknowledged he f**ked up from the get go, cooperated with authorities, and took a plea deal that puts him on probation for 10 years, and without driving privileges for LIFE. I see some genuine remorse from Stallworth…..he didn’t try to cover up the fact he was drunk, and didn’t try to hide anything from the league. If he ran after the accident, it would be no different than Vick meeting with Goodell and lying to his face.

  17. DPR says:
    “And now so has Roger Goodell. Did king Roger ever consider that Stallworth has settled with the victim’s family for millions of dollars and that Stallworth has to actually earn those millions in order to pay the family?”
    **************************
    WTF?
    Since when is it Roger Goodells responsibility to make sure Stallworth earns enough money to settle his “pay off”?
    Thats exactly what Stallworth did……. Bought the family off.
    Sorry, but Goodell doesnt have to play along with that bullsh!t

  18. Let’s see….. A dead body… A light sentence…
    I agree with roger. Stallworth is lucky he isn’t in the can forever. Roger doesn’t have to and shouldn’t have to compound the injustice by letting stallworth continue to play.

  19. Good, I don’t ever need to see this guy enjoying himself in any capacity again.

  20. I’ve never been a fan of how the media jumped on Stallworth for this.
    Death is always a tragedy, but when you cross the street illegally, a car is more likely to hit you. He got hit. I think most of the outrage is from the reports that Stallworth was drunk, but Stallworth did wait quite a while before driving (4+ hours). As hard as this is to believe, jaywalking is illegal because cars are far more dangerous to the jaywalker than the jaywalker is to the car.
    Also this was at 7 am, when traffic is starting to pickup. The guy crossed behind 2 cars and Stallworth hit him.
    For a guy who was trying to do everything to own up for his mistake and one that had a clean criminal record, I can’t see more than 4 games.
    Stallworth’s sentence isn’t one that should be laughed at. He was given 10 years probation, which means if he makes another mistake of any kind, he’ll go to jail for whatever the new crime deems needed and the 15+ years that will be assigned for violating probation.
    Stallworth was given a second chance because his crime was a horrendous accident, but nothing more.
    It’s not special treatment because he’s an athlete either. Most “crimes” never are reported. The ones that are rarely result in arrest (“handled” by an officer at the scene). Then out of those, few ever go to trial. The ones that go to trial are either settled for a guilty plea or innocent. The few that are found guilty through a trial are rarely punished harshly.
    It’s “special treatment” because he cooperated with the process entirely and it was a mistake in the first place.

  21. Standing ovation here! This is not arbitrary at all. According to the precedent set by Vick’s case, indefinite suspension seems to fit the bill.
    Good move, Rog.

  22. If your average American hits and kills someone while driving under the influence they get significant jail time, years in prison not 30 days in jail and 2 years of house arrest. The NFL should not reinstate Stallworth has paid hid debt to society, which means his 30 days in jail and 2 years of house arrest. He bought his way out or jail time, no need to let him off easy again.

  23. Here’s the text of the Twitter announcement:
    OMG!!1! Rgr is susp Stlwrth indef. If u thnk u can do stuff like that ur crazay!! McC out!!one!!

  24. What the world is with the people upset with Goodell? Stallworth killed someone. That hurts the NFL’s image. I don’t care of the guy was jaywalking or not, Stallworth drove drunk and killed the guy. I’d be fired from my job if that happened, so why shouldn’t he be?
    And as for the comments about Goodell causing harm by not allowing the victims to get the money promised to them in the civil arraignment, that’s simply not his problem. Goodell and the NFL aren’t responsible for Stallworth’s blood money.

  25. Favre2012 says:
    June 18th, 2009 at 5:08 pm
    Where’s Jared Allen’s indefinite suspension? It’s not Stallworth’s fault that someone ran across the road. He didn’t drive on the sidewalk. He didn’t torture anyone. I hate drunk drivers, one almost killed my mom once, but Stallworth shouldn’t be held responsible for a moron running out into traffic.
    ================================
    So let me get this straight, it’s the victims fault?
    Stallworth was almost twice the legal limit AND was speeding and you think that jay walking deserves death?
    YOU’RE a moron. Why don’t YOU go run out in traffic?

  26. people need to stop crying about twitter. it’s a source of information, get over it.

  27. I wonder how many people realize that the law in Florida for DUI Manslaughter requires that the person driving is at fault without reasonable doubt. Hence, the guy was jaywalking, I don’t understand why people are overlooking this. Sure, what Stallworth was doing is very wrong, but the guy was running in the middle of the street where he shouldn’t have been. It’s like a scenario where someone gets into a car with someone who they know is drunk. Sure, we’ll blame the driver if the passenger dies, but is it really the driver’s fault if the person knowingly got into the car with someone they knew was drunk? No matter how you spin it, they both shouldn’t have been on the road because while on paper drunk driving is much worse than jaywalking, running in the middle of the street through live traffic carries equal if not more risk than driving drunk (because let’s face it, a lot of people drive drunk that are not caught and don’t kill people or themselves).
    But, people see the headline that omits all of the facts, “Stallworth kills someone while drunk driving,” and base their judgment off of that. Consider the whole story and not just the result, and don’t automatically place all of the blame on the guy who is alive. I’m not condoning driving drunk, and I’m not fully blaming Mr. Reyes, but some of the blame can be put on him given the facts. Being flippant about someone jaywalking, when it is against the law for reasons such as these, is saying that since Stallworth’s wrong is perceived greater than Mr. Reyes wrong, we should automatically say it is all Stallworth’s fault. Causation is at least equal in this case, because who is to say that if Stallworth is sober he still doesn’t hit him, or say he swerves and careens into another car which then causes a major accident where a car may jump the curb and hit bystanders on the sidewalk. They are both to blame, Stallworth is paying the price because he made a stupid decision to drive and Mr. Reyes made a stupid decision to run across the street illegally.
    That being said, because of the result of his action, the NFL has no choice but to suspend him for a large amount of time because you will have people saying that you can’t give him less time than Michael Vick. What’s also intriguing is that this clears the way for the Commish to reinstate Mike Vick (if he decides to) because now his crimes look like spilt milk compared to what Stallworth did. At least, I would hope it does.

  28. I can’t believe some people think Stallworth is the victim here. He was drunk while driving a car. Let one of your family members get taken away because some millionaire won’t dish out a few bucks for a cab. Heck he has millions get a limo.

  29. Favre2012 said: “Where’s Jared Allen’s indefinite suspension? It’s not Stallworth’s fault that someone ran across the road. He didn’t drive on the sidewalk. He didn’t torture anyone. I hate drunk drivers, one almost killed my mom once, but Stallworth shouldn’t be held responsible for a moron running out into traffic.”
    Wow. This is one of the most classless comment’s I’ve ever seen here, and that’s saying a lot.
    Calling a man who was killed by a drunk driver a “moron” – nice.
    While Reyes deserves some of the blame for jaywalking, we should remember that he was crossing near a crosswalk. And Stallworth had time to flash his lights at him, it’s not like he jumped right out in front of Stallworth’s car.
    Had Stallworth been sober, maybe he would have chosen a better approach than just flashing his lights and we wouldn’t even be discussing this.
    In any case, I think it’s disgusting to lash out at the victim like you did.

  30. Good, I’m glad. This guy inked an insane contract with the Browns and had hamstring/groin issues all season.That has been Donte’s M. O. his whole career, save his 4th year. He had one positive teaser year with New Orleans where he had 900 yards and 7 TD’s. He has not even come close in any other season. The Browns signed him to a massive contract after he had 650 yds. and 3 TD’s in New England?
    I’m glad they can unload this massive contract executed by that dim wit Phil Savage.
    Good Riddance!
    P.S. Kenpoblade – “irregardless” is not a word. It’s like saying “I didn’t do nothin’.”
    I hate it when other people correct my speech but c’mon dude, someone must have told you by now?

  31. Let’s see, the court system gives a ridiculous 30 day sentence for driving drunk and killing someone even if the guy was jaywalking that’s light. Everyone who says it was the victim’s fault I remind you each and everyone of us at one time or another in their lives has jaywalked. Now here comes Roger I am the law Goodell who gives out suspensions like he’s holier then thou. Donte Stallworth is paying a penalty that he doesn’t deserve because of public sentiment which is funny when you consider Goodell and the owners don’t give a damn what you or I think as long as they keep making money and whether Stallworth was suspended 4 games or forever guess what? The money train will still continue to roll into the NFL offices in New York. I guess what I’m saying is all this suspension stuff with Vick, Stallworth the star caps boys Burress and whomever else gets suspended in the future is a big bowl of horseshit because if you are a football fan Charles Manson could line up at free safety for your team and you’ll still watch.

  32. MNRunLeft, there is a huge difference between 1st degree murder where the criminal covers it up and manslaughter where the criminal turns himself in. So that’s not entirely true. There are news stories on all news channels detailing terrible sentences for average people all of the time. Just turn your TV off of ESPN.
    Stallworth has actively cooperated to the fullest in this investigation and punishment, which is what makes this a tough decision. If Stallworth tried to get away at all points, I could see throwing the book at him.
    By suspending him for 8+ weeks, (and probably for 2 years while he’s on house arrest), his career is basically over. I doubt he will be on anyone’s list to sign after his term is over. yea, he’s young still, but in 2 years, will anyone really want him? He wasn’t that good in the first place. I don’t think it’s fair to end someone’s career on a mistake they’d do anything to fix.

  33. Now if he could just make up his mind on Buress already. I’m tired of hearing of these turds.

  34. TheHube says:
    June 18th, 2009 at 4:43 pm
    I think this is a big mistake on the NFL’s part.
    The only reason to prevent a player from participating in the NFL is if you think it’s in the player’s best interest (say, drug rehab), it’s required to maintain the integrity of the game (again, drug rehab), or if the player has done something so heinous, you are protecting the game’s image.
    Who cares about the player’s interest if the interest of the supreme head of the NFL doesn’t think that the player suspended indefinitely thought of the public’s best interest before he got in his car drunk. Spin your head around that one nutsauce.

  35. Man, does anybody read anymore? Go read Florida’s law on DUI manslaughter, read about what happened on that morning and then come on here and comment. People are always misinformed. Any lawyer (and I say any because if they passed the bar they have some common sense) would be able to argue this case for Stallworth. Couple that in with witnesses, the fact the man was jaywalking and whatever other details they are leaving out, they would be able to win this case because it cannot be determined, without reasonable doubt, that Stallworth caused the accident. Just because he was drunk does not supercede every circumstance. If he was drunk and got t-boned while going through a green light by a sober driver and a rear passenger died in his car, it would not be 100% his fault. Crying for justice by calling for the laws to be changed just for him is ridiculous. The law is the law, and while he plead guilty to it, the judge is a judge for a reason. He knows that it was not all his fault and that Mr. Reyes contributed to his own death in some way by running across a live street (go ask a five year old if they should run into the street without looking both ways or after kicking a ball too onto said street). The judge weighed all of the facts, the prosecutors weighed them, as did Stallworth’s lawyers, and they came to a conclusion largely in part because Stallworth took responsibility off of the bat and did not fight it, which he could have done. There is a reason why it takes years of education in order to become a lawyer or a judge, because they are required to think critcally, not irrationally.
    Quite frankly, I find it irresponsible of any journalist or blogger who reports the story without reporting all of the facts. Jaywalking is a minor offense, but in this case one cannot reasonably say that Mr. Reyes did not contribute to his death in some way. That being said, I don’t think Stallworth shouldn’t have been on the road in the frist place, but, if I’m not mistaken, he passed field sobriety tests after and did wait before driving. I think that it should serve as a lesson to us all that just because you stop drinking after a couple of hours, it doesn’t mean that you are good to go. But I’m sure none of you have done that before.

  36. vikes02, you need to realize times are changing. Twitter is the news, but eventually something else will come along. You know that it wasn’t ESPN, Pat Forde or anybody else that broke the news of Kevin McHale not returning as t-wolves coach? Nope, instead it came from Kevin Love, on Twitter.

  37. “caused irreparable harm to the victim and his family”.
    The family that wants to move past this and willingly settled with the EXTREMELY cooperative Stallworth? The family that now due to your decision will have to keep hearing NFL Network and ESPN and everyone else talking about this indefinately now thanks to this decision?
    Goodell really needs to go. I know the UFL isn’t realistic competition, but he’s pissing off a lot of NFL fans that are tired of his meddling.

  38. For all the idiots (aka browns fans) who say “the other guy was jaywalking”. Consider. By his own testimony Stallworth, even while driving under the influence, had the time to see Reyes cross the street, flash his lights at him. That means Stallworth knew where Reyes was, AND STILL HIT HIM!

  39. jaxeagle, sure, everyone has jaywalked at some point in their life but it’s called jaywalking for a reason and it’s illegal for reasons such as this one. You don’t think that jaywalkers have been the cause of accidents or have been killed before? Go and see how many stories there are about people trying to cross over to the other side of the highway when their car breaks down and get killed trying to run across. Jeez, I look like I’m defending Stallworth here when I’m really just asking everyone to look at the situation and make an informed opinion rather than reactionary ones. Does the penalty seem light? Yes and no, because he was drunk but if Mr. Reyes doesn’t run out into the street illegally than this accident doesn’t happen. Did he get off because he was rich and (semi) famous? Maybe, but I’m not mad if he did. When you’re rich you can buy a Bentley instead of a Honda Civic, and you can hire the better lawyers than people who don’t have your funds. Technically, he did buy his way out of it because he hired the best lawyer, and it is perceived that the family might have (I don’t know their intentions) sacrificed a stiffer punishment for money (which would be more of a reflection on the character of the family for accepting it, and I don’t believe to be true since there would have been a civil suit anyway). But you can’t fault him or the “system” for that. America is a capitalist nation (thanks Stugotz), not a communist or socialist one. If you want to have the advantages that Stallworth has, go train all of your life to play football and be good enough to make it to the NFL and get paid millions. Otherwise, shut up, or move to a communist or socialist country. If the family is okay with the result then let it be (especially when they know way more about the case than we do). And the suspension is just because the NFL is a business and needs to make decisions that benefit itself. Stallworth is now a detriment.

  40. Zaggs says:
    June 18th, 2009 at 7:02 pm
    For all the idiots (aka browns fans) who say “the other guy was jaywalking”. Consider. By his own testimony Stallworth, even while driving under the influence, had the time to see Reyes cross the street, flash his lights at him. That means Stallworth knew where Reyes was, AND STILL HIT HIM!
    ———————————————————-
    Zaggs, I’m not browns fan, but I find it hard to believe someone running to catch a bus would stay in the same spot. Was he running away from the car or towards it, because that is the only way he would be able to stay in the direct path of the car for the amount of time it took between the lights being flashed and him being hit. Also, go to NYC. If you are jaywalking and a car is coming, the driver will honk their horn and expect you to get out of the way. You’ll be amazed at how many people you see that would have been hit had they not run out of the way, everyday.

  41. Wow, double negative in one of my posts. Should say ” I don’t think Stallworth should have been on the road.”

  42. Go Roger. Stallworth deserves a lifetime ban, or at LEAST the 4 years he was able to buy his way out of in Florida.
    Playing in the NFL is a privilege, folks. If I do this, I get fired, and I never get to return to my employer. Period/exclamation point. No reason the NFL shouldn’t be able to do the same thing to its miscreants. Burress, Vick, Stallworth.. none of ’em should put on the uniform again. Let ’em go get real 8-5 jobs like the rest of us grunts, they blew their chance to represent the NFL.

  43. clintdogg says:
    June 18th, 2009 at 6:45 pm
    “caused irreparable harm to the victim and his family”.
    The family that wants to move past this and willingly settled with the EXTREMELY cooperative Stallworth? The family that now due to your decision will have to keep hearing NFL Network and ESPN and everyone else talking about this indefinately now thanks to this decision?
    Goodell really needs to go. I know the UFL isn’t realistic competition, but he’s pissing off a lot of NFL fans that are tired of his meddling.
    I totally disagree. And I think most ‘NFL fans’ would disagree with your asinine comment. Goodell is doing his job, just like any other CEO would do. Sifting out the turds that don’t belong and shouldn’t belong. And how exactly is Goodell ‘pissing off a lot of NFL fans that are tired of his meddling”?

  44. I thought Stallworth had all this time when driving to honk his horn and flash his lights?
    And he STILL killed this man!
    And was legally drunk!
    He should be behind bars!!!!!!!!!

  45. “GreeneBlitz says:
    June 18th, 2009 at 5:14 pm
    Can’t believe the bozos that think he should not be suspended, you guys ARE the problem in this country, dirtbags like this should not be paid insane amounts of money while under freaking house arrest, period.

    Very well said.
    Granted the other person was J-walking, which is against the law, but not all laws carry the same weight. It isn’t like offsetting penalites in football. If Stallworth wasn’t impaired, he may have seen the guy and avoided him. Actually, let’s say he wasn’t drinking and the same thing happens. You know what would happen to Stallworth? Nothing.. but because he had been drinking, everything changes.
    It’s a tragic situation for both parties and families, but Stallworth still takes most of the blame for being stupid to drive while intoxicated.

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