Ricky Williams thinks there will be no lockout

Though the NFL season has begun, talk of a potential work stoppage in 2011 has not gone away.

But, finally, there’s some optimism from the rank and file.  Though NFLPA Executive Director DeMaurice Smith consistently has said that the chances of a lockout fall at 14 on a scale of one to 10, Dolphins running back Ricky Williams is more optimistic.

“Personally, I have a positive outlook,” Williams said Wednesday in a conference call with media covering Miami’s next opponent, the Vikings.  “I
think that we’re going to come to an agreement.  At least I hope that
there’s not going to be a lockout.  I believe that we’re being
reasonable, and there are certain things that are important to us and
we’re going to fight for.  But I think when it comes down to it, there’s
going to be an agreement reached.”

We hope he’s right.  The return of the NFL football season has underscored that we all love our NFL football, and it’s the responsibility of the current stewards of the game — all of whom are rich and getting richer — to not take our NFL football away.

The mere fact that the possibility of taking our NFL football away is being used as leverage to help one side or the other get rich even faster should be enough to get us riled up.  If that possibility ever becomes reality, we all should be prepared to make our displeasure known.  Loudly.

34 responses to “Ricky Williams thinks there will be no lockout

  1. How is this worthy of an article? One player says something about the ordeal…a player that plays no part in the whole thing, and it’s worth an article?

  2. “We hope he’s right. ”
    Otherwise this site will be crashing and burning.
    Good thing you have a law degree to fall back on.

  3. Levito, last time I checked Ricky Williams is an NFL player. As such, he’s in the union, pays his dues and gets a vote. Now granted, Ricky Williams isn’t at the negotiating table, hammering out the finer details (althought that would be hillarious – “Ok Ricky, just so we’re clear: You’re agreeing to a 15% reduction in player salaries and we’re agreeing to provide a taco bar with all the fixings in every locker room after every game” “ALL the fixings” “Done”), the guy still does have SOME say in the matter. Moreso than you, or me, or Florio.

  4. Lockout talk is being perpetuated by the owners and the NFL to increase ticket sales Today, leveraging fears about Tomorrow.
    Pretty standard sales tactic, am I right? Just sayin.

  5. In response to the first two people:
    1). This is more a blog than a “newspaper,” so anything along these lines would be worthy of an “article.” Not to mention the fact that this is the first person who has said anything other than the sky is falling. How is that not worthy to cover? Every major website on the planet is running that story, why wouldn’t this one?
    2). Why would this site crash and burn? Who better than a lawyer to cover a labor dispute?

  6. I love Ricky. He’s a great football player and he seems to have turned his life around for the better recently.
    that being said, he is still flaky and you have to take what he says with a grain of salt. He is lovey dovey and flowery about everything these days. Everything he says is positive.

  7. @Xpensive Wino
    You’re telling me that you would check back here daily if there wasn’t any football being played now or in the coming season?
    And just because you have a law degree doesn’t make you a lawyer unless your licensed to practice law.

  8. Ricky is the Dolphins player’s rep since Camarillo was traded to the Vikes. So, he’s little more than just a “player.” He can influence at least 52 other guys’ votes (not sure if Practice Squad guys are in the union?).

  9. # RAMROD says: September 16, 2010 9:11 AM
    “Good thing you have a law degree to fall back on.”
    Would you hire him?

  10. what is really funny is this story broke LAST night, yet no one at PFT picked up on it for 12+ hours…..

  11. back in the day before there were any cute banners or advertisements on this site, florio would keep up with the links from his laptop while on family vacation. i dont think there was ever a single day when he didnt provide information.
    if you show up today i can see how many might have a criticism here and there, but the roots of this joint begin with Florio alone, operating on his own dime for about 5 years. i remember when he was asking for an unpaid intern / editor.
    i think sprint was the first official sponsor.
    give the dude a break.

  12. Ricky is the new Dolphins player rep and he is overly optimistic in almost everything. If you ever heard him speak, you would know he’s been that way for quite a while. If you hear Ricky start saying stuff like there will be no football next year, it is time to worry

  13. The mere fact that the possibility of taking our NFL football away is being used as leverage to help one side or the other get rich even faster should be enough to get us riled up. If that possibility ever becomes reality, we all should be prepared to make our displeasure known. Loudly.
    ================
    But we won’t. We never do. Oh sure, we’ll bitch and moan and swear we won’t go back, but once an agreement is reached and the games begin again, Dr. Pavlov will ring his bell and we will all run back like the dogs we are.
    This is why they do it. This is why the owners cry poverty and players claim they aren’t being treated fairly. This is why ticket prices skyrocket and merch prices are out of control. This is why they abuse us with their blackout rules, and make us buy preseason tickets at full price. Because the one constant in this equation is us. We will always be there.
    Why would an owner charge $50 for a ticket when we’ll pay $200? Why would an owner sell a jersey for $75 when we’ll pay $175? Why would owners and players stop holding us hostage to line their pockets when we never do anything about it?
    There is only one group that can affect real change, and that’s us. We need to vote with our wallets and our feet and our remote controls.
    But we never have and we never will. We want a revolution but we want someone else to fight it for us. Doesn’t work that way, sports fans.
    Enjoy your lockout.

  14. “If that possibility ever becomes reality, we all should be prepared to make our displeasure known. Loudly.”
    HOW??? What can the fans do, Mike? Start boycotting games (even on TV, people) now? I think there isn’t an effective way for the fans’ voices to be heard but would love to be proven wrong.

  15. Interesting thought I just had about the lockout/strike situation……The NFLPA wants the owners to open their books to the union, which will promptly selectively publicize them twisted to their advantage. Suppose that the owners agree, provided that each individual player open their books to the owners for scrutiny. The union would scream about none of their business, private info, etc. I run a private company with 86 employees, and it is none of the employees business how much I make/lose as long as I am paying their wages. To think that they should get to look in my companies books to determine whether or not they get a raise/pay cut is completely ridiculous. How many of you (who are employed) think that you should be allowed to inspect and analyze your employers books to determine how much you should be paid?

  16. Willy says:
    September 16, 2010 11:10 AM
    I run a private company with 86 employees, and it is none of the employees business how much I make/lose as long as I am paying their wages. To think that they should get to look in my companies books to determine whether or not they get a raise/pay cut is completely ridiculous.
    ===================
    The difference between your company and the NFL is that player salaries are directly tied, through the collective bargaining agreement, to team revenues. Therefore, the players have a right to know that the numbers the owners are basing their salaries on are accurate.
    I am pretty sure that salaries you pay your employees are not tied to overall revenue therefore the analogy is irrelevant.

  17. realitypolice, it isn’t entirely a bad analogy. I believe the amount of revenue that the league generates must be a readily available number (unless the players/union just takes the league’s word for it what 60% of revenue is, which I think we can agree is unlikely).
    That being said, the owners are saying that they aren’t generating enough profit, not enough revenue. They’re saying that the players are taking up too much revenue so that the owners’ piece of the pie, when you deduct operating expenses, etc, does not leave enough to put in their pockets.
    Who are we or who are the players to say what the owners should be making? The players certainly don’t take into account how much the owners are making when asking for a contract. They don’t say “Well, you know, I’m already making plenty of money and I have a huge bank account, so why don’t you go ahead and knock a couple million off of next year’s pay? Put that into your pocket and take your family out to a nice dinner”
    Now, I think we both know the reason that the owners don’t want to open their books: They are making money. If a typical team makes, say, $30 million/year in profit, that is a good chunk of change, but not significant relative to overall revenue. That being said, if they open their books, the players could jump up and say “Look! Look at how much money they’re making!” and the average idiot (which, unsurprisingly, is a group that includes probably 70% of the population) would say “Wow, $30 million sure is a lot of money. I only make $25 thousand per year, so they make like more than twice what I make” and the owners would lose the PR battle.

  18. EverybodygotAIDS says:
    Who are we or who are the players to say what the owners should be making?
    =========================
    I actually like your post alot, you make great points. But I find this statement interesting. I think most fans would agree with it, And I actually do as well.
    Why, however, does that thinking never apply to the players? Why do so many people feel that we have NO right to say what the owners should be making, but EVERY right to say what players should be making? Is it because we recognize that the owners are businessmen trying to make as much as they can, but don’t recognize the players as such?
    In your post you call people idiots who would say- “Wow, $30 million sure is a lot of money. I only make $25 thousand per year, so they make like more than twice what I make”. (I get the joke- just trying to make a point here)
    Do you also call people who say the same thing about players idiots, or is that more acceptable to you?

  19. Here’s my thought….
    I get the arguments from both sides, and whether we agree with it or not, the player’s union is not going to let go of having a specific chunk of overall revenue. The players have to accept the fact that owners are taking the financial risk and bear all the burden if something horrific happens. After all, even if they stop paying the players what was agreed in the event of some cataclysm, the players aren’t going to be offering up their millions to pay the debts that the owners owe….
    That said, I want to know why overall salary is tied to revenue, but not minimum salary. What do you think the guys who are making the league minimum think of players making $18 million/year? This is supposed to be a player’s union, not the Pro Bowl Player’s Union. Find your percentage of revenue, and then dedicate 60% of that figure to minimum base salary.
    For example… If the minimum cap is determined to be $85 mil, 60% would be$51 mil. Divide that by 53, and you get $962,264 for the league minimum, with $34 mil left to disperse amongst your “stars”. I would be much more on the player’s side of this if they were truly taking care of ALL the players, not just the top 10%. Isn’t that what a union is for, taking care of all it’s members, not just the ones who are already best off?
    p.s. How about taking less money up front and making the owners divert more to pension and medical funds, to be overseen by a private third party company comprised of former players? That way, the ones who are actually intelligent and trusted by their teammates can make sure the money gets where it’s supposed to go. Just a thought….

  20. Back when I was making a few million dollars a year I wanted to go on strike for more money, then I woke up from my dream and realized that if I wanted to keep my 35k a year job I best get to work, the golden goose comes to mind with these fools, they need to set down and work out a deal and play some football. Bill

  21. RICKY WILLIAM: “Like, Dude, Where’s my car, man. I mean my Union Card, huh, huh, huh, The NFL just looks so groovy today. I can see all the beautiful colors from it’s metaphysical presence – it’s beautiful, man.”

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