End of Peterson trial will mark beginning of predicament for team, league

AP

Whether the trial happens on December 1 (as tentatively scheduled) or November 18 (as, we’re told, lawyer Rusty Hardin still hopes it will start), resolution of Adrian Peterson’s child-abuse charges during the 2014 regular season will create a dilemma for the Vikings and the league.

If Peterson is exonerated, there’s no reason to continue to keep him on the rabbit-of-the-hat-or-some-other-orifice Commissioner’s exemption list.  The Vikings would have to welcome him back to the active roster, or to cut him.

If he’s cut after the trade deadline, Peterson would be exposed to waivers.  Assuming that no one would claim his top-o-the-market contract, Peterson then would become a free agent, free to sign with anyone he chooses.  With the clean bill of legal health (sort of) that comes from an acquittal, he wouldn’t be as radioactive as he is right now.

The situation gets dicier for the league if Peterson is convicted.  At that point, his legal process will be resolved.  So would he be reinstated pending resolution of the case under the personal-conduct policy?  Would he get credit for “time served” while awaiting trial?  And if he’s prevented from playing until Peterson’s status is resolved under the personal-conduct policy, would that process be expedited?

It’ll be new territory for the NFL.  Then again, maybe it won’t be.  Panthers defensive end Greg Hardy is due to stand trial on domestic violence charges on November 17.  Hardy’s case could set the precedent for Peterson.

Ideally, the handling of both players won’t be determined by precedent but by foresight, with the NFL deciding how these cases will be handled fairly, proactively, and transparently before the circumstances require action.

So far, action in these cases have created the impression of flying by the seat of the pants and/or shooting from the hip and/or doing both at the same time.

70 responses to “End of Peterson trial will mark beginning of predicament for team, league

  1. It makes absolutely no sense for the Vikings to cut him after his trial, if he’s found to be innocent. If that were the case, they would have already done it.

  2. Should retroactively apply suspension to incentive teams to suspend players while investigation is ongoing. Then, fine them for the games missed, as they are getting paid on the commish-list.

  3. Flat out no. Wash the hands of the guy for good. This is Goodell’s moment. He should stake his job on keeping Peterson out of the league. It would be a no lose situation for Roger, I think. If the NFL caves, Goodell has all the momentum in the world for a run at the White House. Moral authority.

  4. It’s hard to believe he won’t plea this thing out, at which point the NFL can impose the 4-6 game suspension without too much controversy. Then the burden of the difficult decision shifts to the Vikes — and who knows how the heck that will go.

  5. This is really scary for NFL players. With all the cash grab attempts they get being punished for accusations is a horrible precedent.

    I’d rather see the NFL do nothing and come down harder after convictions have been given by the courts.

    I think OJ did it but as an American I must accept what happened in his trial and treat him like he’s innocent.

  6. Why is it that when a PLAYER commits a crime or puts themselves in a compromising position, the team and the NFL must suffer the consequences?

    The resolution is very simple, the NFL and NFLPA agree that when a player under contract commits a crime, is charged with a crime, or puts himself in a situation which brings negative publicity upon the team and the NFL, that player is allowed to be cut, the team is not legally obligated to pay the balance of any salary or bonuses remaining on that players contract, and the team’s salary cap is not charged for any costs that are associated with that player.

    Make NFL players easily expendable, then and only then will they start to realize that they should conduct themselves in a lawful and moral manner.

  7. This whole predicament, of course, came about from listening to the public opinion, media, and sponsors initial gut reactions. Which of course, were overreations in their own right. The NFL did the classic going off the road, and then overcorrecting too hard the opposite way. The NFL has now set a precedence that is frankly unfair to the players.

    Listening to fans, media, and sponsors of the lynch mob is not a good idea. In reality, they don’t know the situation. Sure they try and flex their muscles at the time and act tough with saying things like the NFL is going down the tube, they are going to stop watching the games, etc. After a while, though, they would come back because they’d realize the NFL isn’t going anywhere and is still a cash cow, and they still enjoy the games. Games which are MORE fun to watch with folks like Adrian Peterson, a first ballot HOF in them.

    Let’s be real, Adrian’s crime is not as bad when put in perspective. And he’s a much better human being than the average NFL player. It’s just the fact he’s more fun to tear down because he’s on a higher pedestal. See Tiger Woods.

  8. Cut him now. Lets have a nice clean break and start fresh. Burn those AP Jerseys. He is as crooked and ruthless as they come. Purge his image from all the land.

  9. Prosecution shows pictures of cuts, welts and a battered scrotum, along with Peterson’s confession to causing these wounds. What could the defense say to get an acquittal?

    I see some folks talk about Texas law as it pertains to punishing children. People say Peterson has the right to beat his child bloody in Texas. Those same people defend child abuse because they admire the abuser.

    The dilemma for the NFL and teams is how the public will accept seeing an admitted child beater on the field again. The public is fed up with the economic elite getting a free pass simply because they can afford the price of that pass, or because someone can make a lot of money off of that person.

    An example needs to be made. It is that simple.

  10. I have no horse in this race, but if Adrian is or isn’t found guilty, and doesn’t have to do jail time, I think he should immediately be reinstated. He should receive time served for the 6 or more games that he would’ve been suspended for, yet be subject to a fine. A fine totaling the amount that he would have lost had he not been on the commissioners exempt list. THEN, I would donate that fine to a child abuse prevention charity.

  11. I think it gets dicier for the league if he is acquitted, which I think is likely. If he’s convicted, the court’s decision about the severity of then punishment will set a path for the NFL to follow. If he’s acquitted, there is no guidance for how severely the NFL should punish him. And he could easily argue that he shouldn’t be punished at all. No matter what the NFL/Vikings do if he is acquitted, many people won’t like it.

  12. The NFL is losing revenue due to the actions of a handful of players. I highly recommend that the NFL go on the attack and sue these players to recoup damages for the lost revenue and damage to the NFL’s reputation.

    The players are always suing the NFL, it’s about time that the players get a taste of their own medicine.

    Cut AP. He has earned that.

  13. Moral Authority for Goodell? “You smoked a joint, out four games. You knocked our wife out in an elevator, dragged her out of there ….uh, how bout 2 games…?” Character is displayed by what you do when nobody is watching/paying attention, and he failed.

  14. I said it through the Ray Rice incident and I will say it again here.

    Him being on the exempt list while legal matters pan out is a decent decision. While yes, some guilty people might get paid during the process it does keep them off the team and away from playing which is how they build their value and what they want to do. But this also protects the innocent as well.

    To punish people before they have been given a fair trial to find out exactly what did or did not happen isn’t fair at all. What do you want to do? Suspend every player and kick them off a team and out of the NFL anytime there is an accusation? What if they are found innocent after the trial. Then what? How do you make restitution to that person?

    There are no perfect solutions, but the way I see some people clamoring for certain things certainly isn’t a better way.

    I wonder if the author of this article would enjoy the same standards being applied to him if he was accused of something. Should we arrest him and punish him before he has a trial? In that case, why even bother with all those expensive and lengthy trails? Just skip that part and save everyone the time and money and just go straight to punishment.

  15. if he is acquitted he would have been found to have committed no verifiable crime. This is the same status that most of us live in every day. Whether our neighbors think we smoke pot or drive too fast or engage in insider trading, etc. we have not been found to have committed a crime. I don’t expect him to be acquitted but if he is, he will never get the fair shake you and I would hope for.

  16. He won’t take the plea route ’cause he thinks he’s innocent or will be found innocent in Texas. In any case I don’t care what any NFL player does off the field. Manziel made headlines for partying, Rice knocked his wife out,Hardy did something or other , Mcdonald did something(not famous enough to make a fuss about) and the only way it affected me is it made me stop watching ESPN. I used to like it when football let the legal system run it’s course and didn’t get involved. Players haven’t become worse people over the years, the social media and people in general run with stories till something else comes along, meanwhile actual fract collecting is optiomal

  17. If he is found “innocent”, and the Vikes bring him back, here is one Vikings fan who will boo him incessantly. I will also give up my season tickets because I will not support an organization riddled with that much blatant hypocrisy. Do the right thing Vikings.

  18. My guess is that if able to play this season, they will want to show him off to try and get a better trade for him.

    If he cannot play this season (which is my personal hope), the Vikings will still try to trade him, but if they can’t, they will cut him.

    My own opinion is that me is indefinitely suspended by the NFL and that he never plays pro football again!

  19. Adrian Peterson will be found not guilty it is just they way the do things in Texas. It took two grand jury’s to get an indictment and the second one would have likely failed had not the Ray Rice stuff happened the day before.

  20. I cant wait for this bs to be over. All these media garbage peddlers digging up bogus stories from years passed trying to muddy Peterson’s name with no regard. Whether hes found guilty or not im sure the league will find a way to make a bigger mess of this.

  21. There’s no predicament here. If he’s guilty, he gets the Vick Deluxe Suspension package and if he isn’t, give him a 4 game suspension for putting himself in position to embarrass his team and the NFL.

    Even with the clusterfark of lies and incompetence that the handling of the Ray Rice idiocy by Goodell and cronies, at some point Rice should have a chance to earn his way back to the NFL. After all, he was the only honest party in the whole mess. He may be a slimeball but at least he owned up to it. Meanwhile Goodell’s still scrambling for more transparent BS excuses to somehow absolve himself of using his authority in player disciple to try and do a favor, an unethical competitive advantage favor, for his buddy by suspending that buddy’s player for far less than he would if he wasn’t a buddy.

    Goodell doesn’t work for the owners. He works for the one third plus one owners it takes to keep a two thirds vote to fire him happen. The sad part is just about everyone can name most of those 11 guys off the tops of their heads.

  22. The ONLY way he plays again is if he has a trial and is found innocent. If he pleads out or is found guilty he’s done, and he should be. And i’m a Peterson fan, but even more of a fan of kids.

  23. 2013 Minnesota Viking RUSH Offense = 8th in NFL

    2014 Minnesota Viking RUSH Offense = 10th in NFL

  24. So far, action in these cases have created the impression of it being how to best cover their ass reaction to the mob mentality being fueled by the media after the media discovered how much interest they can get from this type of sensationalism after they reported on the Ray Rice video.

  25. I think 2 questions really need to be asked:

    1. Should the NFL be a law unto itself?
    2. Is it the NFL’s job to determine if (and what) crimes have been committed by its players?

    My opinion may not be popular, especially with the masses, but I think the general policy should be to let the legal process play out. Then with convictions (or, more likely, guilty pleas), then the NFL can have its pound of flesh.

  26. The policy moving forward should be that players are sat once charges are brought for a violent or drug related crime. They have to sit on the Commisioner’s Naughty List, recieving games checks until the trial is held. If the player is convicted, the ensuing suspension should be retroactive and the player should be fined any money made during the suspension, and recieve no game checks for any remaining suspension. If the player is declared innocent, then they should be allowed to return to practice immediately with an active roster exemption until they are back up to speed (no longer than three weeks), and any games lost should be counted as if they were on the active roster for contract bonus purposes and free agency.

    It makes the NFL and teams look like they are doing something about the violent crime issue in the league at the moment, allows players the chance to deal with legal issues and not also have to perform on the field, and have a real consequence to anti-social behavior that would hopefully cause players to be more responsible with their actions.

  27. As much as it pains me to say this, if he is found not guilty in a jury trial, the NFL should back off.

    While I fully support taking players off the field until their cases are heard, I cannot justify suspensions for players who are fully exonerated by a judge or jury of their peers.

    Which, BTW is NOT the case with Ray Rice. Unlike what some people think, Rice was not exonerated- he was placed in a pre-trial intervention program which is NOT an acquittal. I believe the NFL has every right to suspend him, and every right to suspend players who accept any type of plea deal to avoid trial.

    If I was arrested for something and then later fully exonerated by a jury, I would not lose my job. So I feel it would be hypocritical for me to demand that someone else lose theirs.

  28. Even if he’s found not guilty, I wouldn’t touch him with a ten foot pole. Why? Character. How is a guy with six kids out of wedlock and an obvious child abuser (even if legally acquitted) someone you’d want on your team?

    That said, I agree that players being disciplined without a conviction of a crime (or sometimes even without being charged) is problematic and concerning. Anyone could make up anything, and a player could lose his job. Not right.

  29. wayoffpiste says:
    Oct 8, 2014 2:00 PM
    If he is found “innocent”, and the Vikes bring him back, here is one Vikings fan who will boo him incessantly. I will also give up my season tickets because I will not support an organization riddled with that much blatant hypocrisy. Do the right thing Vikings.

    ———————-

    Don’t let the door hit you on the way out, but before you go please explain the vikings hypocrisy for, in your example, punishing an innocent man.

  30. there’s nothing like reading the envious, if not downright jealous, comments of haters who’d change places with AP in a heartbeat….

  31. “It makes absolutely no sense for the Vikings to cut him after his trial, if he’s found to be innocent. If that were the case, they would have already done it.”

    Not necessarily. The sooner they cut him the sooner they take the accelerated cap hit.

    They also lose the opportunity to go after any of his last signing bonus if they do so.

  32. They’re not going to cut him. Why you guys keep saying that everyday like that’s going to make it true is beyond me. Why would they have tried to bring him back originally before stashing him on this list? Why would they have not cut him immediately instead of stashing him on this list? Enquiring minds want to know, dum dums? Unlike the idiots on this site, they know this will blow over as soon as TX acquits him. Bridgewater isn’t going to be up for a new contract until Peterson’s on his way out of the league in 4 years. Who else are they clamoring to spend money on that this cap demands that they cut him so soon? Crickets. All this has done is rob him of a season that he should be playing in.

  33. GB packers are so scared if he come back to the vikes cause they know he will return with anger and a lot of it and torch them so bad it will be time to have another jersey in the hof with another record broken

  34. The Vikings aren’t going to cut Adrian Peterson.
    The Broncos aren’t going to cut Peyton Manning.
    The Texans aren’t going to cut J.J. Watt. The
    Seahawks aren’t going to cut Richard Sherman.

    Legal issues aside, its a football organization. Its a company. They will work with Adrian and offer counseling and support and help him grow as a person and maybe right his wrongs.

    The idea of cutting him is ridiculous. The Ravens cut Ray Rice as a red herring for the fact that they covered up the second tape, it distracted the media and the public(both of whom have the attention span of an insect towards a lightbulb).

    The fact that people would say they would cut him based strictly upon an emotional response, without resolution, or even logically thinking it through and using the higher reasoning function of your brains is not a good litmus test for having a woman as President.(see what I did there?)

  35. I have an idea: why doesn’t the NFL simply GET OUT of the player discipline/social justice business? The players are under contract to their TEAMS, and not the NFL, and it’s the TEAMS who should be making disciplinary decisions on their own players, and not Roger Goodell.

    Baltimore released Ray Rice when the video of him decking his future wife went public, deciding he was more trouble than he was worth. When you also factor in the reality that Ray Rice is pretty much radioactive at this point, and that it will most likely be quite some time before anyone else signs him, that’s pretty significant punishment right there. Why does the league have to get involved on top of it? Oh, that’s right: they’re the Left’s new Morality Police.

    Consider for a moment if there were such a thing as a National Accountants League or “NAL”. Joe Schmo, a conservative Southern boy who works for Arthur Anderson, decides to take a switch to his son. The boy’s teacher notices the marks and reports him to the “authorities” who charge Joe with child abuse. So, Arthur Anderson, deciding Joe is an embarrassment to the firm, fires him. Fair enough. But, instead of being able to accept a job offer at Coopers Lybrand, the NAL has suspended Joe indefinitely from earning a living pending the outcome of his child abuse case.

    Fortunately, such a scenario is as fictitious as it would be outrageous. Yet, this is the reality for professional athletes. The only difference, of course, between Joe Schmo and Adrian Peterson or Ray Rice is that the latter two are considered “role models”, “heroes” or “idols”, and are therefore held to a much different standard. While this might be fine for children or adolescents, adults who engage in this type of hero worship belong in therapy.

    As Charles Barkley once famously observed, “I am not a role model”. Adrian Peterson and Ray Rice aren’t role models either, and adults who expect them to be need to get a life…

  36. Long term this “pre-suspension suspension” policy where guys are sitting out before the real suspension is even addressed simply will not work. The media will move on to something else, the uproar will die down, and Goodell’s successor will likely be the one to quietly announce that they’ll be going back to waiting for the criminal justice system to complete its process before handing out suspensions for everything beyond the most extreme cases.

  37. Amazing how the narrative turns around once people get a chance to think for a second.

    Too bad we have every outlet shoving OUTRAGE down our throats at every chance.

    This is fairly simple: The NFL should stay away from punishment until the legal process is complete. Granted, they’d need some language to account for extreme circumstances, but right now they’ve put players in the crosshairs.

    and still..the NFLPA gets a free pass..are you guys EVER going to “report” on that route? The CBA didn’t sign itself.

  38. Peterson’s future really doesn’t have anything to do with the outcome of this case. Whether he’s found guilty or not guilty, we all know what he did. The only way for him to save his career is to admit that he went too far in his punishment, make a sincere public apology, and get help. He has to show that he knows he did something wrong and will never do it again in order for most fans to accept him back.

    He really isn’t very smart, is he?

  39. treat him like he’s innocent.

    55

    5

    dryzzt23 says:Oct 8, 2014 1:28 PM

    “The resolution is very simple, the NFL and NFLPA agree that when a player under contract commits a crime, is charged with a crime, or puts himself in a situation which brings negative publicity upon the team and the NFL, that player is allowed to be cut, the team is not legally obligated to pay the balance of any salary or bonuses remaining on that players contract, and the team’s salary cap is not charged for any costs that are associated with that player.”

    The NFLPA will NEVER agree to this, nor should they. And the NFL shouldn’t be in the business of punishing people just because they have had allegations of wrongdoing made against them. People are falsely charged of crimes all the time in this country, yet you would have these players lose their jobs just because someone, a vindictive ex-girlfriend or someone else with an ax to grind, perhaps, makes an accusation against them. That isn’t right.

  40. He needs to be at least suspended for 6 games. Fining guys like this is a joke. It basically works out to docking them about 1 hour’s worth of pay.

    Adrian sentenced his 4 year old kid to 20 + lashes.

  41. Agreed stung4ever1983.

    The media is now trying to lead us to believe that America should fix how it handles its domestic violence cases by punishing 1st time offenders as guilty until proven innocent from a sports/entertainment entity that has a pool of about 2000 players. Never does it mention addressing how the legal system is handling domestic violence cases from a pool of everyone in the country.

  42. Many fans and others get the personal conduct and criminal issues confused. AP is a contract employee of the Vikings under the auspices, policies and procedures of the NFL and NFLPA. To the extent the Vikings have conduct policies in their player contracts they have virtually unlimited flexibility to retain, suspend, or terminate their employee. The NFL does have some authority also but not as much as the team.

    So here you have a contract employee that has admitted, with pictorial evidence, that he whooped his 4 year old child in a whooping room to the point he had open wounds a week later. There is nothing the Vikings have to wait for to act; criminal. civil, whatever, NOTHING!.

    The sad ridiculous fact is that the only variables
    that matter to the Vikings is that he is a HOF player, a key to their internal marketing, the size of his contract, and his age. The only reason they will ultimately cut him is that he is overpaid for his value. All this pontificating about “due process” is sickening. But the worst team of all is the 49ers – talk about hypocrites!

  43. At the heart of this entire episode lies a basic (and as yet unanswered) question: Was this a one-time incident where Peterson excessively disciplined his son, or is this a pattern with him that his other children have experienced as well?

    Until that question is answered, any questions about Peterson’s future in the NFL will remain unanswered.

  44. REDSKINSFOREVER says: Oct 8, 2014 2:52 PM

    Don’t let the door hit you on the way out, but before you go please explain the vikings hypocrisy for, in your example, punishing an innocent man.

    ___________________________________

    He is NOT innocent. He admitted to abusing his child. A grown man struck a child with a stick…several times. His kid is frightened of him. He is scared of “daddy’s belt room”. There is no innocence here my friend.

    The hypocrisy would be the claim by the organization that they are an upstanding, positive force in the community. This was their mantra as they proclaimed the need for public funding of a stadium. You can’t have it both ways: if you want to play the card that the Vikings are a positive agent of the community you cannot have child abusers in your organization. Period. Spare me the rhetoric that Adrian grew up that way…Do not claim for one second that this is discipline. You can discipline a child without beating them.

    So, that is why I will put my money where my mouth is. If Adrian Peterson remains on the Vikings squad after this, I will give up the seats I have held since 1996. And you know what brother, there are MANY others like me.

    I am confident, however, that the Vikes will do the right thing. SKOL.

  45. It must be very frustrating for a viking fan these days because feeling relevant means discussions about a child abuser. Just think a couple weeks ago some were talking Super Bowl.

  46. Look if he is found “not guilty” then he us not guilty and the NFL has to move him off the list and allow him to continue to play. You can’t legally punish someone for something they haven’t done.

    Then what the Vikings (or any other team) does is up to them. Cut him, play him, sign him whatever it is a business decision.

    If he gets convicted then the NFL can put him on suspension until he meets certain conditions.

    The big “IF” becomes if he gets a suspended sentence, goes on probation with the opportunity to have the conviction expunged.

    Either way the NFL goes then they are screwed.

  47. This could be a watershed moment for the league and the sport. There are no equivocations here, in terms of being “targeted” by a “gold digging woman”, or “drunk guy at a club”, etc. etc. Pederast went into THE CHILD’S HOME, and assaulted him in a vicious and prolonged fashion. A FOUR YEAR OLD. Who likely weighs less than 50 pounds and wouldn’t recognize his “father” on the street, unless he was pointed out.

    They can undo a lot of bad impressions by getting this one right, regardless of what the Courts decide. There are no grey areas here, sport is meant for children, and the adults who play it at the highest level are meant to inspire children. Not humiliate and traumatize them with a weapon because they wouldn’t share a remote or whatever the hell it was.

    Be done with the turd and broadcast it loud and proud, for everyone to hear. Make a positive impression on society for once.

  48. No matter what happens, Goodell must go. Unfortunately his cowardly strategy of laying low has worked and everyone already seems to have forgotten the ineptitude of his actions during the Ray Rice case. Goodell is the symbol of domestic violence enablism, and must be canned.

  49. The NFL doesn’t have to reinstate him if he is aquitted. Based on CBA if conduct is detrimental to the league they can suspend, and based on the uproar as well as sponsors backing out or threatening to it was detrimental. Did the apologists see the pictures?

  50. I do not feel that the NFL or teams should be playing judge and jury on players that have not been found guilty in a court of law. (plea deals are the same as guilty) The laws of society need to be the ones deciding on punishment for legal offenses. The NFL is over stepping their position as employers of athlete/entertainers. If fan/sponsors/judgmental people have a problem with the court’s punishment of law breakers, take it up with the people that write and/or enforce those laws. Just because a player is accused of something is not reason enough to punish in any way that player until they are proven guilty. Once a player is found guilty, then it gets sticky because, does the NFL or teams have the right to further punish someone after they serve the punishment of the law? From my point of view the league only has the right to suspend for a predetermined number of weeks a player whose conduct does not live up to the NFL’s established rules of personal conduct. That policy should be enforced for any player that breaks the personal conduct policy, rather that is through PEDs, DUIs, domestic violence, child abuse, illegal drug use or anything else that goes against the conduct policy. Then if there is a second incident there should be a stiffer suspension. The third strike rule should be applied for anyone that breaks the conduct policy for a third time. With that kind of overall structure, there would be little reason for everyone to be forming these lynch mobs and witch hunts due to the fact that all players are treated the same AFTER they are found guilty of an offense.

  51. @mecca

    You mean the pictures that are currently a part of a felony case involving a minor, and said pictures that containgraphic images of a 4 year olds inner thigh, leg, and buttocks? Unfortunately I did, and unfortunately so did countless other child molesters/pedophiles on national tv. SMH

  52. experts talk about the win-win situation and this is just the opposite lose/lose. regardless of the criminal outcome or whether there was intent to commit serous injury or gross negligence on his part he will never be the same and his playing time will never be the same.

    The NFL is a commercial biz and while I don’t approve of dog fighting or child endangerment the latter to me is a much more serious accusation.

    I don’t see how he comes out of this anywhere close to where he was going into it regardless of the trial outcome and whatever happens the critics will pile on him and the NFL.

    I guess there is something to “the bigger you are the harder you fall” cliché.

  53. I think the media should stop trying to blame the employer for not babysitting these employees.

    I wonder if NBC hovers over their news anchors to make sure they don’t get a DUI or cheat on their spouses.

  54. The NFL deserves harsh criticism for lying & then trying to cover how they mishandled the Ray Rice incident but why isn’t the law punishing these players?

    The NFL’s punishments for Rice, Peterson, & Hardy have been a heck of lot more than anything they’ll receive from any judge or court so where’s the outrage at the legal system that continues to give professional athletes a pass???

  55. ‘ravens533 says: Oct 8, 2014 4:27 PM

    I do not feel that the NFL or teams should be playing judge and jury on players that have not been found guilty in a court of law. (plea deals are the same as guilty) The laws of society need to be the ones deciding on punishment for legal offenses. The NFL is over stepping their position as employers of athlete/entertainers. If fan/sponsors/judgmental people have a problem with the court’s punishment of law breakers, take it up with the people that write and/or enforce those laws. Just because a player is accused of something is not reason enough to punish in any way that player until they are proven guilty. Once a player is found guilty, then it gets sticky because, does the NFL or teams have the right to further punish someone after they serve the punishment of the law? From my point of view the league only has the right to suspend for a predetermined number of weeks a player whose conduct does not live up to the NFL’s established rules of personal conduct. That policy should be enforced for any player that breaks the personal conduct policy, rather that is through PEDs, DUIs, domestic violence, child abuse, illegal drug use or anything else that goes against the conduct policy. Then if there is a second incident there should be a stiffer suspension. The third strike rule should be applied for anyone that breaks the conduct policy for a third time. With that kind of overall structure, there would be little reason for everyone to be forming these lynch mobs and witch hunts due to the fact that all players are treated the same AFTER they are found guilty of an offense.’

    Ravens533,

    I agree with you. Goodell is a not a judge in a court of law. If the laws are too soft then that’s a societal problem that the legal system needs to fix not the NFL.

    People were so outraged by the league handing out a 2 game suspension to Rice but what did the courts do? They allowed him to enter into a pre-trial diversion program where he received no punishment or probation. Where’s the outrage at the laws in the state of NJ or the District Attorney & the judge???

  56. People (fans) amaze and disappoint me.

    Mike Vick kills living defenseless animals and now look, he’s back in the NFL and no one cares. Ray Lewis hides evidence in a murder and now has a statue. Bret Favre abuses pain killers and texts his junk to a female news person and now the Packer nation is going to induct him into their hall of fame. And there’s many more.

    Once the legal system has run its course the NFL and the Vikings will have choices to make. I’m 100% sure no matter what happens Peterson will be employed by a NFL team (Vikings or otherwise) because he’s too talented to ban and people will say the same thing they always say. “He’s served his time, paid his debt and now he deserves another chance”.

  57. Where’s the outrage at the laws in the state of NJ or the District Attorney & the judge???

    ————————————–

    That is dead on for where the outrage should be. The trouble is outrage there does not move the needle for the consumption of media so that is why you do not seeing it being mentioned by Florio and his ilk. It would be of little benefit for them. They report on what will get consumed the most and the mob eats it up. Yum.

  58. Does it seem odd to anyone at pictures of a minor in an ongoing criminal investigation were made public?

    They’re trying to try this thing in the public opinion not the courts

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