NFL says Vincent’s comments are consistent with Goodell’s

AP

On Tuesday, NFL executive V.P. of football operations Troy Vincent was asked on Capitol Hill to explain why Commissioner Roger Goodell didn’t try to see the elevator video showing Ray Rice knocking out Janay Palmer.

Said Vincent, candidly:  “I don’t think there was a need for a second video to impose proper discipline.”

The NFL contends via email sent to PFT that Vincent’s words, which could be interpreted as an admission that the league didn’t need to see the second video because it knew what the second video showed, are consistent with Commissioner Roger Goodell’s explanation to Norah O’Donnell of CBS News from the day after the second video emerged.

As O’Donnell asked, “I mean, on the first tape she was lying unconscious on the ground, being dragged out by her feet.  Did you really need to see a videotape of Ray Rice punching her in the face to make this decision?

No,” Goodell said.  “We certainly didn’t.  And I will tell you that what we saw on the first videotape was troubling to us in and of itself.  And that’s why we took the action we took.  As I’ve said before, we didn’t feel that was sufficient, we didn’t get that right.  But what we saw yesterday was extremely clear, it was extremely graphic, and it was sickening.”

But Goodell also said this regarding the first video:  “That was the result that we saw.  We did not know what led up to that.  We did not know the details of that.  We asked for that on several occasions.  It was unacceptable in and of itself what we saw on the first tape.  And that’s why we took action, albeit insufficient action.  And we acknowledge that, we took responsibility for that — I did personally — and I take responsibility for that now.  But what we saw yesterday was extremely clear and graphic and was absolutely necessary for us to take the action we did.”

That’s where the confusion lingers.  As Vincent said Tuesday, the first video showed conduct that was “heartless, gutless, and despicable.”  The league knew Rice had knocked out Janay Palmer.  A man knocking a woman unconscious typically will be “extremely clear and graphic,” regardless of what it specifically looks like.

“Well, we certainly didn’t know what was on the tape,” Goodell told O’Donnell in September.

The NFL didn’t need to know, Vincent essentially said on Tuesday.

Ultimately, it’s a matter that former FBI director Robert Mueller will have to address in the report of his investigation.  If he concludes that the NFL didn’t ask Rice for the second video because the NFL knew what it showed without seeing it, some owners possibly will regard that as the equivalent of a finding that the NFL actually had the video.

42 responses to “NFL says Vincent’s comments are consistent with Goodell’s

  1. Does anyone really expect differently? It’s up to the judicial system to enact justice under the law. It’s up to legislators to ensure the laws conform with overall social norms and moral standards. And when both of them fail to do their job, we expect a business to step in and make decisions that conform to our societies senses of morals and justice? NO!

    The league made decisions based upon employment law, contract limitations and public relations. They did the very best they could in situations when it was clear to most people that the legal or political systems had failed. That is neither rational nor fair.

    And now Congress is stepping in… as if they have ANY standing to judge or fix the problem.

  2. While Ray almost killed her by hitting her, I can’t get the image of him spitting on her out of my mind. All of it shows his sickening disrespect for her and the second tape is a LOT worse than simply seeing a “passed out” woman being dragged/dumped out of an elevator.

    Unless specifically not allowed by the CBA, double jeopardy should be allowed. This is employer/employee/contract law not government punishment. The second tape is additional evidence.

  3. That’s fine that the NFL says it didn’t need to see the tape, I know it didn’t. But that doesn’t explain why only two games and then an indefinite suspension.

  4. And so continues the ever-changing and always morphing position of Roger Goodell, as he tries sooo hard (but unsuccessfully) to not fall all over himself with contradictions.

    One would have to be really maladroit at the skill of “connecting dots” to fail to understand what is really going on here.

  5. I’ve never been a hater of Goodell mostly because he gets paid $40 plus million to be the escape goat of 32 super rich pompous jerks who could care less about platers, fans, or safety. However, this bold face lying and covering up is straight stupid. They could have easily have come out and said they screwed up. The only reason for this cover up is because of money and brand safety. If they admit to lying the NFLPA has a weapon on them in future negotiations. What makes the NFL so great is the domination of the owners over the players in collective bargaining. By being so powerful to basically be able to eliminate guaranteed contracts out of the league, the league has maintained a level of almost full parity at a relatively low cost. Look at how disastrous this is for other pro sports from a fan’s perspective. Only 3-5 teams ever has a true chance if winning in the other leagues. My point is that Goodell could have just told the truth and weathered the storm. But he didn’t because of bargaining position in future discussions. This leads to the blatant lying and has made things a thousand times worse.

  6. Players gonna play play play play play

    Players gonna play play play play play

    Haters gonna hate hate hate hate hate

    GOoDell gonna lie lie lie lie lie

    Nfl nfl whoo hooo hooo

  7. “It was unacceptable in and of itself what we saw on the first tape. And that’s why we took action, albeit insufficient action. And we acknowledge that, we took responsibility for that — I did personally — and I take responsibility for that now.” That’s exactly what Vincent said today.

    At least Goodell can admit he made a mistake. When’s the last time the NFLPA accepted culpability for anything? It hasn’t. The union is too busy blaming everyone else for the transgressions of its members.

    The NFLPA has no interest in being part of the solution. To do so, it would first have to admit its players are causing the very problems it’s trying to pin on Goodell. Something the union is constitutionally incapable of doing. As such, the NFLPA will continue to go to the ends of the earth to keep people from looking at the man behind curtain.

  8. So just to recap – the NFL didn’t need to see the tape of the actual abuse to impose what they felt was a proper punishment

    (Indeed Rice’s own statements confirm that he assaulted her unconscious)

    And the “proper punishment” imposed by Goodell was 2 games

    THAT’S the issue here.

    Goodell’s effort to spin the reason why they had no interest in investigating further once “justice” had been served by sitting him 2 games (while non violent weed smokers are out a full season) is artful at best

  9. Just admit it already, you cowered under pressure from the public and sponsors.

    TMZ got you and they got you good.

    I fear the day when the public, who knows less and less of a story, gets more and more say in the outcome of the people involved.

  10. I wish that NFL management would suspend themselves for 2 games. Excuse me, I mean 6 games. Excuse me, I mean indefinitely.

  11. I have said this for a few years and here I go again.

    The NFL offices is full of liars. Goodell being the chief liar.

    Which means the NFL owners are all liars because they retain and empower this liar.

    That hurts and I try and watch football only ignoring the owners and Goodell and concentrating on the players and coaches.

    I would never use a second of my time to meet or talk to an owner of Goodell. I have NO RESPECT for liars.

  12. And Ray Rice’s and AP’s statement aren’t consistent with what their NFLPA lawyers told them to say?

    Players commit crimes and the media reports it. When the NFL exercises its disciplinary powers, as it can b/c it is an EMPLOYER, the media suddenly becomes a players advocate.

    It seems as if objectivity has been absent from the media for about 40 years now. They just tell you whatever will forward their own agenda.

  13. While Troy Vincent may have thought it was not necessary to see the video from inside the elevator… obviously Vincent is wrong.

    The facts are clear…Goodell and Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti are “golfing buddies”…and Goodell was trying to do a favor for Bisciotti, giving Ray Rice just a 2 game suspension.

    Roger Goodell and Bisciotti misjudged the public outrage and have been playing word games (most of common folk call it “lying”), trying to cover their butts.

  14. jucam1 says: Dec 2, 2014 10:46 PM

    I’ve never been a hater of Goodell mostly because he gets paid $40 plus million to be the escape goat of 32 super rich pompous jerks.

    Hey, we Packer owners can be jerks (to Viking fans) when we want to, but we not super rich.

  15. His suspension length doesnt matter.

    Who the heck is going to sign Rice and 1, deal with the protesting fans, and 2, deal with the ire of the NFL executive offices?

    Rice is most likely out of football for at least a year or so before anyone will give him a shot. And he was near the end of the road as is. Baltimore cut him immediately. So his suspension is irrelevant anyway.

  16. Goodell has done a lot of bad things to the game, watering it down tremendously but there is literally zero proof that he has lied about anything with this no matter how badly the media wants you all to think there is. You sheep are buying it too.

  17. Can’t wait to see the results of the “investigation” by the “unbiased” NFL employee, Mueller.. I’m sure they will give the report on a late Friday afternoon while everybody is out enjoying their weekend.

    This crap is too predictable.

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Not a member? Register now!