NFLPA issues strong criticism of NFL’s new personal conduct policy

Reuters

As the NFL Players Association privately considers potential legal challenges to the new personal conduct policy, the NFLPA has issued a strong public statement criticizing the league’s new policy.

“The NFL owners had an opportunity to show leadership and vision in the wake of the embarrassing missteps by the League office,” NFLPA executive director DeMaurice Smith said in a statement issued to NBC Sports. “Limiting a Commissioner’s power who has repeatedly abused his discretion is a good start, but in light of the NFL’s wild inconsistencies and egregious mismanagement, it does not go far enough. If the only goal of this policy was to appease our sponsors in the short-term to get through this crisis then they succeeded, but they missed an opportunity to bridge the credibility gap with players that is nearing the point of no return.”

The NFLPA has objected to the NFL’s failure to engage in collective bargaining regarding the new personal conduct policy. The NFLPA also has identified to player leadership specific concerns raised by the new policy, including the league’s decision to disregard the Fifth Amendment, the use of paid leave for players charged with certain crimes, and the decision to delegate the initial decision regarding discipline to someone other than the Commissioner.

30 responses to “NFLPA issues strong criticism of NFL’s new personal conduct policy

  1. “I strenuously object?” Is that how it works? Hm? “Objection.” “Overruled.” “Oh, no, no, no. No, I STRENUOUSLY object.” “Oh. Well, if you strenuously object then I should take some time to reconsider.”

  2. Who cares about the NFLPA and their struggles. Do they ever win anything vs Goodell/Owners?

    Oh yea, Richard Sherman’s drug test appeal.

    So the score is:
    NFL 100
    NFLPA 1

  3. Yeah yeah yeah, whine all you want. But until they actually file for “system arbitration” or however that works, this is just unnecessary whining. It’s annoying.

    Not that they’re wrong to do it but put your money where your mouth is and then maybe you’ll gain some respect again

  4. I will, however, give them credit for bringing in the sponsors. We haven’t heard a peep from them since they “threatened” to pull out back in September in the midst of the Rice disaster.

    Bringing them in again may persuade them to reconsider their stance with the Mueller report due soon.

  5. The NFLPA… the organization that defends wife beating, child abuse, drunk driving and use of illegal drugs…
    ———–
    Things that ALL good unions and defense attorneys do.

  6. It’s a start… but just go to court and sue the day lights out of Roger Goodell and the league already. It’s the only way they will get the attention of the owners and require them to get rid of good ol Roger. It’s plainly obvious.

  7. Will be interesting to see how they are going to sue of an collective bargaining agreement that the player reps approved and signed.

    The players gave these rights to the owners. Good luck with the lawsuit.

  8. Instead of arguing the policy D. Smith ought to try educating these morons on adult responsibilty which includes not beating your kid bloody, punching your wife out and taking banned drugs

  9. You don’t like the new policy – quit and form your own league with your own rules, drugs ok beating wife and kids ok course you morons won’t be making the millions you do now but at least you can do what you want

  10. You know, DeMaurice Smith blew into the NFLPA like he was actually going to DO something. Thus far, a lot of hot air, arguing for the sake of arguing, and now strenuously objecting, which is the same as “oh yeah?”

  11. By ignoring the 5th amendment, the league will punish players for failing to answer questions that could then be used to incriminate themselves. The criminal justice system is allowed to bring in evidence from any type of hearing, including whatever kangaroo court the NFL is holding these days.

  12. The NFLPA also thinks the Patriots should be forced to pay Aaron Hernandez millions while sitting in jail awaiting 2 murder trials.

  13. Think about it this way. If an investigation is taking place at work – theft, accusations of harassment, a fight, etc. – and you choose to not answer the questions – you lose your job.

    The only place that a presumption of innocence exists, is in a court room.

    Like many union reps – De Smith needs to rattle sabers every so often or his players will vote him out next time he is up. (Or possibly even consider filing an unfair labor charge against him).

    The players gave up the right to have someone other then the Commissioner of the NFL be the final arbiter for discipline in their contract. I am sure if it is important enough to the players to get this back in the next round of negotiations, they will offer something big to the NFL for that right.

  14. Shocking how many here want to throw stones and are standing up for “the man”. I guess it’s millionaires complaining about billionaires but use a little common sense. I guess for most of you here if you got in a car accident and were charged with vehicular manslaughter because the police thought it was your fault you would be okay with instantly losing your job and having your name dragged through the mud before you even had your day in court.

    NFLPA is not standing up for murderers and child beaters, it’s standing up for fair and consistent rulings, a neutral process, and collective bargaining. What’s wrong with waiting for the legal system to play out and then handing down a 6+ game suspension!? All for making the punishments harsher.

  15. tonebones
    Dec 14, 2014, 7:27 PM CST
    The NFLPA thinks Charles Manson is a model citizen.
    ——–
    This is literally the best you came up with? Comparing AP’s case to a murderer? Just stop posting.

  16. honkerdawg
    Dec 14, 2014, 7:59 PM CST
    You don’t like the new policy – quit and form your own league with your own rules, drugs ok beating wife and kids ok course you morons won’t be making the millions you do now but at least you can do what you want
    ——————
    Do you realize you’re basically advocating against every idea the United States of America was founded upon?

  17. Adrain Peterson was dealt the punishment meant for ray rice. Rice was reinstated as part of a deal to keep his mouth shut about what he told Goodell. Goodell and the ravens orchestrated the biggest coverup in nfl history and put all the blame on Adrian Peterson for spanking his kid.

  18. I feel like Goodell is punking us on the PFT message boards. He made up a bunch of fake accounts and is now posting “The NFLPA loves child abuse! That Goodell is really a swell guy.” and then giving his post a bunch of thumb up’s.

  19. Owners “Did you read the CBA that you recently approved? “. NFLPA “Ah man, reading is harrrd”.

  20. They sound like petulant children: scream for attention, then when they ignore you anyway, scream because you’re being ignored.

    Maybe when they stop acting childish, they’ll be allowed to sit with the grown-ups.

  21. fondyball20 says:
    Dec 14, 2014 11:12 PM
    Shocking how many here want to throw stones and are standing up for “the man”. I guess it’s millionaires complaining about billionaires but use a little common sense. I guess for most of you here if you got in a car accident and were charged with vehicular manslaughter because the police thought it was your fault you would be okay with instantly losing your job and having your name dragged through the mud before you even had your day in court.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    In the real world – if you are charged with Vehicular Manslaughter and are placed in jail pending the trial – you will in 99/100 cases lose your job, because of your inability to report to work. There is a chance that you could use vacation/personal time for the trial – but there is a point where your employer would can you.

    In addition – if you are charged with Vehicular Manslaughter, and your mug is in the papers wearing a Shirt/Jacket/etc that identifies you as an employee of a company – the company might term you as well for damaging their reputation.

    As stated earlier, the only place where a presumption of innocence exists is in a courtroom. You are entitled to your day in court. At work, these protections don’t exist – and never were intended to. Losing your job is not a comparable loss to losing your life or spending time in prison. If you lose one job, you can get another. If you are in prison, you lose all of your rights. Major difference.

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