Draft prospect Cedric Ogbuehi suffers torn ACL in bowl game

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A year ago, Texas A&M left tackle Cedric Ogbuehi might have been a first-round pick in the NFL Draft, before the school enticed him to return by paying for an insurance policy.

Unfortunately for Ogbuehi, that draft stock has taken a hit, with the news that he suffered a torn ACL in the Aggies’ Liberty Bowl game against West Virginia.

Via Robert Cessna of the Bryan-College Station Eagle, school officials confirmed the injury, and Ogbuehi will have surgery to repair the injury.

He was slated to play in the Senior Bowl, but will now have to wait to see how far he falls in the draft before someone is willing to burn a pick on a player who might need to redshirt this season, or at least be compromised heading into training camp.

While the college experience is one of a kind and an education is a building block for a secure future, he remains a cautionary tale.

Any player who thinks his future is in the NFL and gets reliable confirmation of that should simply go the first chance they get, so they can actually be compensated for putting their body at risk for their ability to play a game well.

27 responses to “Draft prospect Cedric Ogbuehi suffers torn ACL in bowl game

  1. The policy only kicks in if its a career ending injury. Hindsight is 20/20 but I think that degree will serve him well in the long run.

  2. You do not need good knees to go to school. You need good needs to play football. If the draft graders project you as a first to second rounder, make the jump.

    You can always go back to school once your playing days are over.

  3. Supposedly the policy is similar to Lee’s which had a draft slide clause in it. Looks like Lee wasn’t eligible to collect the full 10 million, but rather 5 for his slide. Pretty sure his policy is structured the same way.

  4. I used to be in the camp of stay in school, graduate then play pros…..but with the money on both sides of the fence reaching astronomical levels in the past few years, I have to agree with the last paragraph….go as soon as you have confirmation if in fact the NFL is your goal.

  5. This kind of makes a mockery of the academic side of college sports….

    The top high school recruits are going to higher education merely as a means to play a sport and participate in what, for them, is basically a farm league for the pros. Why go to classes at all? Just create a separate classification and make the education part of their college experience optional.

  6. He earned that “free” degree. Now it’s going to cost him money no college degree is going to bring him. How many kids graduate and even find jobs nowadays. Go Pro soon as you’re eligible.

  7. Many are commenting that you can, ‘always go back to school.’

    You are missing the true reason. Most players return for one more season because the college football setting and camaraderie.

    The NFL is a business while the college game is still fun for them.

  8. The heck with college football. The NFL should make a developmental league that pays young kids to hone their skills. 18 year old kids can play baseball for money, why not football?

  9. ninerfan81 says:
    Jan 13, 2015 10:35 AM
    The policy only kicks in if its a career ending injury. Hindsight is 20/20 but I think that degree will serve him well in the long run.
    _________________________________
    Because so many of us with degrees make NFL money

  10. I don’t know what kind of dreamworld these “you should be satisfied with a free education” guys live in, but the reality is that for many, if not most, players in big time programs are limited by the Athletic Dept in what courses they can take and they better be for automatic “A”s, or they may see their scholarship go away. Not only don’t most big time program athletes graduate, but those that do get an extremely inferior education. Put that with the fact that their high schools let them glide through and many are functionally illiterate.

  11. I don’t buy all the “cautionary tale” talk. If you want to go pro as soon as you can, fine. But don’t use the “I must go pro now, because I might get hurt” reasoning. If you do things because you are afraid to get hurt, you’re going to get hurt. Nowadays, with the pre-determined salaries of draft picks, you aren’t set for life with that rookie contract if you get hurt. After Uncle Sam, your agent and your other people (accountant, lawyer, etc.) get their cuts, there’s not enough to live 60 more years on. So go pro because you appear to have a lengthy career ahead, not because you’re afraid to get hurt in college. Don’t play not to lose.

  12. Remember when athletes left early and were called selfish by the media. Now they stay and the media calls them dumb. Must be nice to be the media. Your never wrong.

  13. stevent92 says:
    Jan 13, 2015 1:57 PM

    ninerfan81 says:
    Jan 13, 2015 10:35 AM
    The policy only kicks in if its a career ending injury. Hindsight is 20/20 but I think that degree will serve him well in the long run.
    _________________________________
    Because so many of us with degrees make NFL money
    ————————————————
    I’d argue over the long run we do…especially those of us with engineering degrees and Tier 1 graduate degree…on average, we’ll earn more than the average 3 yr NFL wash out. Odds are he won’t make it and his degree will make HIM eligible for grad assistant gigs that may end up being lucrative down the line. ALSO, he’s networked at a great university and in a great conference. So I stand by my stance that a degree will serve him well if he’s not one of the very very few to have a career longer than a few years.

  14. @hockeyflow33:

    I spent three years as the head manager of a DI men’s basketball team with several of our former players graduating to play either NBA or overseas ball. When I am presented the opportunity to speak to my former teammates over the phone, e-mail or in person, they all share the same sentiment.

    “I miss road trips, I miss staying in the dorms, I miss late night dining hall trips and hotel foolery.”

    Sure these guys have to balance practice and full course-load but its done together. The professional ranks is a business through-and-through. The collegiate ranks is void of the ‘business’ lifestyle.

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