86 college players apply for early entry to the draft

Getty Images

When the 2015 draft commences in late April, the incoming class of players with expired college eligibility will be enhanced by 86 players who had remaining years of play in the NCAA.

Per a source with knowledge of the situation, 76 players applied for “special eligibility” (i.e., at least three years removed from high school graduation) and 10 players who will be graduating but who have remaining eligibility.

The total for 2015 represents a sharp drop from 2014, when a record 102 players opted for early entry to the draft.  Of those, 98 were not due to graduate.

The 2015 numbers remain higher than the total for 2013, when 73 applied for “special eligibility” and six early graduates entered the draft.

The number of underclassmen requesting an official NFL pre-draft evaluation fell from 214 in 2013 to 149 in 2014.  While some may see this as players making more informed decisions about their futures, others could interpret the decline as fewer players choosing to factor the NFL’s assessment into their final decision.

According to the source, there were six official first-round evaluations this year, and all six players declared.  Of 20 second-round evaluations, 14 entered the draft.

Of the 149 underclassmen who were evaluated, 123 of them were advised to stay in school (which apparently is the advice given to players not pegged for rounds one or two).  Thirty-three of them ignored the advice.

The numbers won’t be official until Monday, because all players who applied for early eligibility have until Sunday night to change their minds.  Although the official NFL evaluation process is far from perfect, those who received a recommendation to stay in school had better feel good about their chances to be drafted and/or to stick on a roster in 2015, especially if one more year of college would have made them better prepared to earn one of the 2,016 spots available on active rosters and practice squads.

34 responses to “86 college players apply for early entry to the draft

  1. Let’s be honest- a lot of these players didn’t want to be in college.

    The NFL won’t employ a player, regardless of how qualified the player is to play, until three years after their HS class graduates.

    Every player who has declared has fulfilled that ridiculous requirement.

  2. It’s not a ridiculous requirement. It’s a good one. These players need to grow up physically, mentally, and emotionally before they compete in the NFL or anything similar.

  3. NHL and AHL, NBA and D-League…

    The NFL should partner with the CFL.

    It’s the most logical thing to do in order to develop these kids…and maybe then the CFL might become relevant.

  4. buffal0s0ldier says:
    Jan 17, 2015 12:09 PM
    NHL and AHL, NBA and D-League…

    The NFL should partner with the CFL.

    ++++++++++++++++++

    The NFL doesn’t have to, and thus pay for it themselves. They already have the NCAA to do it for them.

    Colleges already train all the first and second day draft players the NFL can handle. No reason for the NFL to pay to develop players almost all of whom at best would be on the fringe anyway.

  5. For those of who think the three year rule is silly:

    Coming out of high school 6 foot 5 300 pound Leonard Williams, who is a top 5 draft prospect, was 245 pounds.

    6 foot 6 260 pound Randy Gregory, also a top 5 prospect, was barely recruited out of high school and was only 200 pounds.

  6. Good year to have extra draft picks. This is already a deep draft and extra underclassmen just makes it deeper. Also makes sense to start recruiting possible undrafted players. As soon as it is legal anyway

  7. But my agent told me I’d be drafted in the 3rd round at the very latest, and he’s an honorable man!

  8. But the national attention has been on the guy who’s played in 3 games.

    __________________________________

    Actually, it hasn’t. But nonetheless, those were 3 pretty big games. First they had to win the big ten conference championship game by a whopping margin to make it into the top 4. Next, they had to beat Alabama who regularly makes mincemeat out of teams from the Midwest. Then they had to beat the fast break offense and no brakes defense of Oregon to win the natty.

  9. “You can always go back to school if it doesn’t work out.”
    —————————————————

    Not on a scholarship anymore. You’ll have to pay your own way.

  10. Don’t be ridiculous. The 3 year requirement is not because the NFL is concerned about their maturity. It is there because the NFL doesn’t want to kill the Goose that lays the Golden Eggs; the NCAA programs. College football obviates the need for minor leagues, like they have in baseball, and which are expensive.

    The talk about education is misguided as well. Most college scholarship football players aren’t getting an education. They take courses specifically designed to keep athletes eligible and in which they don’t learn anything. They are highly discouraged from taking any courses in which they may not do well.

    Most of these kids will probably get signed, many as undrafted free agents, and will make more money in their usually short time in the NFL than their classmates will make in 10 years following graduation.

  11. The CFL is a great league to watch. Come June, when the games are on ESPN and ESPN2, and online at ESPN3, I urge you to watch and enjoy. Go Ticats!

  12. The 3 year rule is a clear violation of player’s civil rights and the constitutional right to make a living in your profession without impediment.

    _________________________________

    Um….. No. They can go and play for money in any other league they want or start their own league. It’s no different than not being hired by a business that wants 3 years of experience when you don’t have any. Not illegal at all.

  13. Less players went through the College Advisory Committee because the NFL restricted access. How is offering less evaluations helping more players make informed decisions? More players who went through the College Advisory Committee declared for the draft than past years. So a higher percentage of players who went through the committee declared for the draft. The NFL gave less information, not more.

  14. ok that many is almost the first three rounds worth of picks….maybe if the BSPN would pay these kids while in school , many would stay. But hey when coaches are making millions, Why shouldn’t the kids.

    With every single bowl game is on bspn, that they need to look in the mirror and take some accountabilty…..

    With that said looking forward to watching the senior bowl next week….it’s loaded with good talent this year.

  15. There’s always Japan & Austria. Seriously. Start going over seas, there are growing leagues. The NFL needs to be put in check.

  16. Hey Corkspop: 18 year olds that have not matured physically or emotionally can join the army, go overseas and kill or be killed but these same men cannot play in the NFL. THAT MAKES SENSE TO YOU ?

  17. mungman69 says: Jan 17, 2015 8:13 PM

    Hey Corkspop: 18 year olds that have not matured physically or emotionally can join the army, go overseas and kill or be killed but these same men cannot play in the NFL. THAT MAKES SENSE TO YOU ?

    —————————————

    There’s one big difference here. In the military, an 18 year old has next to no money in his pocket, a CO keeping an eye on him 24/7, and no time to spare. In the NFL, an 18 year old with big money in his pocket and time to spend it is a recipe for trouble.

  18. thelastpieceofcheese says:
    Jan 17, 2015 1:35 PM
    The 3 year rule is a clear violation of player’s civil rights and the constitutional right to make a living in your profession without impediment.
    ————————————-

    Constitutional right?

    No one has a constitutional right to be someone’s employee against their wishes.

    The Constitution, for those of you who are too dense to understand is a limiting document on the actions of Government and not on the people.

    Basic civics has been destroyed and replaced with this? We’re doomed.

  19. The majority of nfl work is classroom/ film study. You got a kid who can run like a deer but can’t spell it, he’s done before he starts.

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Not a member? Register now!

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.