Blandino says NFL will look at permitted pressure range

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The entire #DeflateGate controversy sprang from the provision in Rule 2 of the official NFL rule book regarding the mandate that the football be filled with enough air to create 12.5 to 13.5 PSI of internal pressure.

That’s been the standard for a very long time, according to NFL V.P. of officiating Dean Blandino.

“I have rule books going back to 1940 in my office, and that was in the 1940 rule book,” Blandino told reporters this week during a Super Bowl football operations press conference. “[NFL Senior Vice President of Player Personnel and Football Operations] Joel Bussert, who many of you know in the league office who’s kind of a historian, he’s got rule books that go back prior to that. It’s been in there even before 1940.”

So where does the range come from?

“[W]e really rely on the experts in the football world, [football manufacturer] Wilson, to give us that number,” Blandino said. “That’s where that spectrum comes from. I feel like we will review that with Wilson and the Competition Committee to look at if we need to have a range or what will that acceptable range be.”

On one hand, it’s surprising that a rule with so much current importance to the game carries an it-was-like-that-when-I-got-here vibe. But there’s never been a question regarding whether teams were tampering with footballs to take them beyond the long-accepted range.

If some quarterbacks like the air pressure lower than 12.5 PSI, it’s fair to ask whether all quarterbacks should have that discretion. Despite the importance of respecting the integrity of the game by demanding that teams not deviate from the accepted limits, this situation naturally leads to the question of whether changing the accepted limits would in any way undermine the integrity of the game.

Many believe that footballs should have as much or as little air in them as the quarterbacks want. In a league without enough good quarterbacks to go around, maybe all quarterbacks should be given the option to put whatever amount of air in the balls they desire.

127 responses to “Blandino says NFL will look at permitted pressure range

  1. Even before this controversy, it’s been reported that the officials even over-inflate balls for Aaron Rodgers, knowing he likes them that way.

    Why is this now an issue after the Patriots make the Super Bowl? Why wasn’t it an issue after the Rodgers comments were made?

  2. I deflated the balls.

    I freely admit it and await the execution so many fans and media have a asked for.

    Don’t buy those people who say it’s a minor offence. No punishment is bad enough for my heinous crime.

  3. Really, seems a stupid thing to have a rule on.

    Check them for stickum maybe, but otherwise let them play.

  4. Everyone just needs to let this go. I mean it’s not like this area has ever had a college basketball team shave points, it’s not like this area ever had a pro football team film other teams signals, it’s not like this area has a pro baseball team that has pitchers doctor the ball and people have photographic evidence of that…whoops I guess it’s just something about the Boston area.

  5. anyone whose ever played or even touched a football would know the advantage one gains from deflating footballs..look, i respect brady, belichick, & everything the patriots accomplished BUT (& there’s that but) to think they won’t be forever linked to cheating is comical.

  6. As pitiful as this entire “scandal” is, the league response has been worse. They once again change the rules to placate a few players.

    Favre gets burned by a FG in sudden death OT, they change how OT works.

    Manning’s receivers get beaten up a little by Patriot defenders (when he was in Indy), they change the rules about covering receivers.

    Brady gets a knee blown out, no more hitting QBs low. Not even accidentally.

    Brady gets caught deflating balls, now they will consider allowing a range.

  7. Bronco Nagurski liked the ball at 12.5 PSI, so it shall ever be… idiotic.
    Every other part of the game has been changed, from the makeup of field they play on to the equipment they wear, to gloves, to stickem, to 6 different kinds of cleats, to the location of the goal posts, helmets and facemasks, to what IS a catch and what IS NOT a catch, to what is a legal hit… yet for some reason a single PSI of pressure in the ball has created the greatest cheating scandal since Watergate.
    It doesn’t matter, so take it out of the rule book. Heck, we allow forward passes now. Maybe it should have been changed at that point in time.

  8. Yea let it go. Put Bonds in the HOF as well.

    Let everyone start cheating.

    I find it more interesting to think about the ways the Pats cheat that we have yet to find out about.

  9. PhD scientist here…

    the rule book needs to specify that the football pressure needs to be 12.5-13.5 psi WHEN IT IS MEASURED AT ROOM TEMPERATURE.

    Because… pressure drops as temperature drops, people. It is a reality of science.

    12.5 psi @ 72F will go to
    11.5 psi @ 52F, will go to
    13.5 psi @ 92F

    ALL WITH NO TAMPERING!

  10. Why do people keep focusing on the benefits to the quarterback with this issue? A ball inflated to a lower psi not only makes it easier for the quarterback to grip, but easier for receivers to catch and running backs to hold onto. Fans are over Belicheats antics. Go away.

  11. The Patriots are going to thoroughly blow out the Seahawks, they’re gonna make it look easy

  12. Leave the rule book the heck alone. Just add an exemption from it for the Patriots and everyone will be happy they no longer can cheat.

  13. stealthjunk says:
    Jan 31, 2015 4:01 PM
    Hard not to be reminded of the Tuck Rule and how the NFL changed the rule the next year because of the Patriots.
    ———————————————————————————–
    That is simply not true. You are 100% wrong. The tuck rule was in place since 1999 and the patriots were actually “victims” of the ruling vs. Miami earlier in the year. Shocking his you conveniently forget that. But hey, why let little things like facts get in the way of a good argument.

  14. …”maybe all quarterbacks should be given the option to put whatever amount of air in the balls they desire.”

    Or maybe we should go back to the way it was before Brady and Manning pushed for access to the balls before the game, and maybe all quarterbacks should play within the rules.

  15. all4patriots your no scientist, studies have been done and are listed showing very little air pressure lost within 4 hours of being exposed. Just get your NE Cheatahs Jersey on.

  16. The aerodynamics of the ball is being completely
    ignored here. A softer ball(less air) will in fact create more friction and take longer to reach its
    intended target. A ball let’s say 13.5 psi will sail at a faster speed and have more hang time than
    a ball with less PSI. The actual time difference would in fact be minimal but recordable.
    That being said does it really matter if the balls
    have a PSI variance?

  17. Pittsburgh fans and Baltimore fans one steroid gate the other murder gate two worst teams in the NFL bloody cheaters

  18. Here’s the perfect solution to all this crud.
    Get rid of those footballs and replace them with Nerf ones.
    Then there will be absolutely no questions ever if the ball was over or under inflated.
    Honestly, I feel like I’m reading about episodes of Seinfeld. Just a whole bunch of nuthin made to look like sumthin.

  19. all4patriots:

    As a “PhD Scientist”, could you explain why all the Colts balls tested OK? Do physics apply differently at Foxboro depending on which sideline you stand on? I’m sure that’s it.

  20. So, in 1940 the NFL simply copied the recommended pressure off the box the ball came in and this is offered as a solemn and expertly crafted rule to ensure fair competition that cannot be deviated from even in the slightest?

    The NFL have made themselves look like fools, led by the head fool of them all.

  21. stealthjunk says:
    Jan 31, 2015 4:01 PM
    Hard not to be reminded of the Tuck Rule and how the NFL changed the rule the next year because of the Patriots.

    ————————————————–

    Hilarious how uninformed and ignorant one person can sound. The “tuck rule” was an actual rule that was used against the pats in week 2 vs the Jets. Also used in 2005 redskins/broncos and a playoff game in 2011 chiefs/ravens. It wasn’t taken out of rule book until march 2013.

    But i remember my first post on a football site……

  22. Why is so hard for some people to realize that: the current rule’s ambiguity has allowed quarterbacks to “unofficially” have their option on ball pressure for as far back as 2007, when Brady and Manning went to the NFL mountain and convinced the gods to allow teams to use their own balls.

    The only reason for this outlandish chain of conversations around ball pressure is due to Indy being sore losers. Check the record, Indy got hammered, pressure change or not.

  23. So yet another example of Pats* shadiness (see, the Tuck Rule, the 2004 AFCCG vs the Colts where mugging receivers was legal and then the next season the League suddenly stopped that practice in response to the outrage, etc.) or problem (the “Brady Rule” means no one can look at a QB) leading to a rule change. Go figure….

  24. all4patriots says:
    Jan 31, 2015 4:07 PM
    PhD scientist here…

    the rule book needs to specify that the football pressure needs to be 12.5-13.5 psi WHEN IT IS MEASURED AT ROOM TEMPERATURE.

    Because… pressure drops as temperature drops, people. It is a reality of science.

    12.5 psi @ 72F will go to
    11.5 psi @ 52F, will go to
    13.5 psi @ 92F

    ALL WITH NO TAMPERING!

    ————————————————–
    thank you for this dissertation Dr. Belecheat

  25. Goodell and the rule book will just need to catch up to where the players and the refs are. It’s pretty clear that the refs don’t care nor do the players. It’s also fair to say that stuff has been happening for years, with teams playing with balls either in or de-flated by (1) weather or (2) intentional acts both before and/or after referee checks.

    Thanks to the whiner Colts, a process that was a variation of the Wild West will now be rewritten and codified such that balls will now be treated like nuclear warheads and weanies from Deloiite will patrol the sideline with gauges.

    Are we better off or just reaching new levels of absurdity?

  26. 3xapple says:
    Jan 31, 2015 4:30 PM
    all4patriots:

    As a “PhD Scientist”, could you explain why all the Colts balls tested OK? Do physics apply differently at Foxboro depending on which sideline you stand on? I’m sure that’s it.

    ___________________________________
    Sure Binky, I will explain it so even you can understand. The NFL has never said how low the Pats balls were. Let’s say Indy likes theirs at 13.5, and the Pats at 12.5. Due to the temp outside say the balls drop .4. The Pats would be 12.1, and indy’s would be at 13.1. Indy’s would test legal, the Pat’s would be under. The amount of air in each ball was never confirmed by the NFL. I am sure the refs just gave them a once over, they weren’t up to snuff to begin with and now the NFL is in CYA mode.

  27. @luther6
    The bigger issue is air pressure and fumbling.

    ——

    Those statistics were debunked by other statisticians that wrote a rebuttal you can read on Deadspin, amongst a number of other places. As they point out:

    The Patriots had 6 fumbles at home this year (which they recovered all 6).

    The Vikings had ONLY 2 fumbles on the road this year. 1/3 of the Patriots HOME total.

    Should we conclude that the Vikings are cheating on road games???

  28. “On one hand, it’s surprising that a rule with so much current importance to the game carries an it-was-like-that-when-I-got-here vibe. ”

    Yeah, soooooooo important that we all certainly knew inflation specifics before this nonsense got snatched up by the media.

  29. So yet another example of Pats* shadiness (see, the Tuck Rule, the 2004 AFCCG vs the Colts where mugging receivers was legal and then the next season the League suddenly stopped that practice in response to the outrage, etc.) or problem (the “Brady Rule” means no one can look at a QB) leading to a rule change. Go figure….

    ——————————————————–

    Wow! So much ignorance. Tuck rule was in books from 1999-2013. Yes wide receivers tend to get rough up a little more in the playoffs. It is less now because of the rule changes but it still happens in the playoffs and SB. BUT the reason this came to be was because of BILL POLIAN and PEYTON MANNING showing film and complaining about how physical the pats D was. Now you have your ticky tack NFL where receivers and DB’s can’t even fight at the line of scrimmage. Thanks COLTS! And the BRADY rule?!! There were many other qb’s carson palmer for one getting their knees cheaply taken out so the NFL protected them. But please answer this……Are you complaining about being to physical or not enough?
    You complained about mugging receivers but then complained about not being able to mugg qb’s. You sound like a total DB.

  30. “So yet another example of Pats* shadiness (see, the Tuck Rule, the 2004 AFCCG vs the Colts where mugging receivers was legal and then the next season the League suddenly stopped that practice in response to the outrage, etc.) or problem (the “Brady Rule” means no one can look at a QB) leading to a rule change. Go figure….”

    Clueless. Absolutely clueless. The “tuck rule” was put in place in 1999, moron.

    Secondly, you use the example of the Pats “mugging” Colts receivers to illustrate the point of making it easier on QBs which was lobbied for by Peyton and Dungy. Nothing to do with the Pats.

    Lastly, the “Brady rule” is absolute nonsense. The rule you are thinking of was a response to Carson Palmer’s ACL injury the year before Brady’s ACL injury.

    If you have no idea what you are talking about, stop posting.

  31. With a tight range of 12.5 to 13.5 psi, its ludicrous to think that footballs haven’t been out of that range for thousands of NFL games. For crying out loud, the league has never, not 1 time, tested the PSI at halftime or game’s end until a couple weeks ago.
    Further, its known that the official often “gauges” the footballs with a squeeze test to approve or disapprove.
    Disgruntled teams and league employees are tired of the Pats winning and went after them again.
    This is 2008 again, with a (proven) false allegation the night before the Super Bowl.
    This one may not be disproven like the last allegation of cheating,
    but I don’t see it being proven to have happened, either.

  32. advantage to players? Brady crushed the Colts using allegedly deflated balls and surely inflated balls. In the end it’s the players’ total ability that win or lose games. How big is the role of psi in the complex game of football? A lot of players already chimed in on this issue. It’s not a big deal. It’s only a scandal because the alleged culprit are the Patriots. It overshadowed everything so much do that even the President and the Vice- President joined the circus. The NFL should scrutinize itself and remedy their incompetence. That is the most glaring revelation that surfaced on these non-stop scandals. Never mind the psi. There are rules already but the referees did not do their jobs.

  33. well.. what is the data… if footballs inflated with ’72’ degree air inside.. or at ‘Wilson’, then at 52, 20 degrees colder… just like the tires on cars… the stupid air pressure tire light goes on ..on the dash for new cars… every one is lined up at the gas station for the tire machine air…

    yeah.. and are the gages ‘calibrated’ to accurately reflect measuring the difference …

    what is the gage accuracy ? plus or minus… a half pound… a qtr pound

  34. For those who keep bringing up the tuck rule, here’s what happened. The NFL replay official called it. The Patriots thought it was a fumble, and were walking off the field. The game was in the last 2 minutes, so only the league official could call it. Had it happened before the 2 minute warning, the Pats couldn’t challenge, as they were out of time outs. So stop blaming the Patriots, and take your wrath out on the official who called it.

  35. The Colts are to blame for this whole debacle. They were the ones who took a bunch of air out the intercepted ball and tried to to blame the Pats in the worst backfire ever. Irsay and Pagano should be suspended a year, fined a million bucks each, and all their draft picks should be given to the Pats.

  36. Whether it should be up to the QB is meaningless right now. The rule was in place, the rule was broken.

    End of story. Punish those involved for violating the rule.

    In March, look at altering the rule, if deemed proper, but a violation has occurred.

  37. Sure Binky, I will explain it so even you can understand. The NFL has never said how low the Pats balls were. Let’s say Indy likes theirs at 13.5, and the Pats at 12.5. Due to the temp outside say the balls drop .4. The Pats would be 12.1, and indy’s would be at 13.1. Indy’s would test legal, the Pat’s would be under. The amount of air in each ball was never confirmed by the NFL. I am sure the refs just gave them a once over, they weren’t up to snuff to begin with and now the NFL is in CYA mode.
    ———————————————

    are you always such an insufferable a -hole or just a typical Pats fan cool aid drinker

  38. The Ravens and Colts head coaches are a bunch of whiney crybabies. They both got schooled by the Pats and are all butt-hurt over their shortcomings. These two clowns, Harbaugh and Pagano, are nothing more that cheese-eating rats.
    Maybe Jim air say is the only dignified member of the Colts. Stew on that a while.

  39. 3xapple says:
    Jan 31, 2015 4:30 PM
    all4patriots:

    As a “PhD Scientist”, could you explain why all the Colts balls tested OK? Do physics apply differently at Foxboro depending on which sideline you stand on? I’m sure that’s it.
    ==============

    PhD scientist’s numbers and explanation are exactly correct and anyone that has taken even entry level college chemistry should be able to do the simple math himself.

    To your question, 3xapple, there are many very plausible answers to your question:

    1. The most obvious is that we don’t actually know what pressure the balls were at the beginning of the game or at half time for either team. There have been all sorts of leaked info but much of it has proven to be incorrect.
    2. They waited longer to test the colts balls. Some reports say they tested them after the game…probably as an afterthought knowing the clowns that run the NFL. The longer they sit at room temp after the game, the less difference there would be compared to the original pressure.
    3. The colts balls may have started at a higher pressure so when they dropped it wasn’t as noticeable when compared to the 12.5psi lower limit.
    4. The Pats balls may have need more inflation at the time of pre-game check. Experiments have shown that air coming out of some hand pumps can be as hot as 130°F. When this air cools…guess what happens.

    The bottom line is that this is the first anyone has ever heard of measuring balls at halftime of game and the dopes running the show don’t have the brains to recognize all the things that can go wrong when doing measurements like this.

    But, it is helpful to know that, no matter what, there are some constants in this world:

    1. PATS: WIN
    2. YOU: WHINE
    3. REPEAT

    GO PATS

  40. 3xapple says:
    Jan 31, 2015 4:30 PM
    all4patriots:

    As a “PhD Scientist”, could you explain why all the Colts balls tested OK? Do physics apply differently at Foxboro depending on which sideline you stand on? I’m sure that’s it.

    ——-
    Considering Belicheats “My Cousin Vinny” reference last week, I see what you did there with the physics reference.

  41. NE drafted Hernandez and it’s a sign of how they are because of his pending trial. Bill Polian drafted Rae Caruth in Carolina. A man convicted of murdering his pregnant girlfriend yet no outrage. Pundits use the phrase “the pats have a culture of cheating” yet they’ve paid the penalty for doing so only once. Taping the other teams signals was deemed against the rules starting in 2007, the year they were caught and since then they’ve been penalized for nothing else. Jerome Bettis referred to New England as “known fellons” yet bill cowher admits to doing the same thing. No outrage. The chargers were caught and penalized for using “stick um” two seasons ago, yet no outrage. The cowboys and redskins were docked draft picks and fined for salary cap violations last year yet no outrage. The last time the 49ers won a Super Bowl they tampered with the salary cap as did the Broncos. All rules violations. All competitive advantages. NO OUTRAGE. Belichick is cold towards the media. Yet Lynch answers no questions and is applauded and defended by some pundits for his “individuality”. A kid goes to the bathroom for 90 seconds with footballs and came back out, once again in 90 seconds and it’s suspicious?

  42. comingfromthevacuum says:
    Jan 31, 2015 4:50 PM
    If you have no idea what you are talking about, stop posting.

    _____________________________

    Why that would mean 50% of the morons would not be able to comment on here….frankly I enjoy reading the idiotic statements….especially from the science deniers.

  43. Someone above summed it up perfectly..

    With science being all pesky and “sciencey”, it’s quite possible hundreds, if not thousands, of games have been played with balls out of the 12.5-13.5 spectrum.

    Anyone measure the balls during the famed ‘ice bowl’? Even if they filled those to 13.5, there is no chance they’re within legal range by the end of the game. No chance.

    In fact, after all the data revealed this past week, I’d be willing to bet any game played under 30 degrees will likely have a ball under regulation by the end of the game.

    Also, to people asking why the Colts didn’t deflate… stop. Just stop. NOBODY said the Colts balls didn’t deflate. Nobody even gave any numbers. They simply said the Colts were within legal range. If the Colts inflated to max range, they had a 1psi window to deflate, yet still remain legal. At 50 degrees, that’s entirely possible.

  44. Well, we have a precedent for what the Colts did to the Patriots at the AFC Championship game.

    In the Miss Amazon 2015 pageant a runner-up ripped the tiara from the head of the winner and accused her of cheating.

    I wonder if the vote was 45-7.

  45. “As a “PhD Scientist”, could you explain why all the Colts balls tested OK? Do physics apply differently at Foxboro depending on which sideline you stand on?”

    no problem, EASY:

    Patriots footballs:
    12.5 psi at 72F- PASS
    11.5 psi at 51F- FAIL

    Coltss footballs:
    13.5 psi at 72F- PASS
    12.5 psi at 51F- PASS

    The physics is the same, the drop is the same. It really, really is as simple as that.

    PhD Indiana University 1991
    MS Yale University 1986

  46. The best thing about science is you don’t have to believe it for it to be true.

    Boyle’s law shows that, at constant temperature, the product of the pressure and volume of a given mass of an ideal gas, assuming a closed system, is always constant. It was published in 1662.

    The main issue with early calculations was just looking at temp and pressure. The constant atmospheric pressure needs to be added to the equation. Many academics have done these experiments in the last week.

    Belichick learned gas laws and physics in 2 days. His delivery was somewhat jumbled.

  47. “The physics is the same, the drop is the same. It really, really is as simple as that.”

    It really is pretty simple. Unfortunately NOBODY in the media covered that aspect, so people continue to joke about how science only worked on one side of the field.

  48. The physicists cited in the news worked with formulas. HeadSmart Labs, a private firm in Pittsburgh, tested actual footballs. It found that footballs inflated at 75 degrees, then cooled to 50 degrees lost 1.1 pounds of pressure.

    The lab took one more step. Since it was raining on game day, the staff dampened the balls. This led to a drop of an additional 0.7 pounds of pressure for a total of at least 1.8 pounds per square inch.

  49. The funny thing about this whole episode is what teams do when they get the game balls. If you read up on what they all do to make the balls suit their game its hilarious and now we are worried about 1-2 PSI’s.

    How about this… play with the balls as they come from the manufacturer with NO heating, cooling, rubbing down and whatever else they do!!!

  50. Khan Academy came out and made a video why the balls deflating were plausible as well, and they even used the reported 2 psi drop (which was only said by like one reporter)

  51. welltobefair says:
    Jan 31, 2015 5:03 PM

    Stop using a hashtag every time you mention “deflategate”

    Signed, every PFT reader, and every NFL fan.
    ———————————————————
    Dear Hashtag,

    I was here FIRST,

    Signed,
    pound sign

  52. >what is the gage accuracy ? plus or minus… a half pound… a qtr pound

    .5 psi either way is within acceptable limits for the gauges they use

    So you have measurement error, no info about what they were inflated to when the ref squeezed a few of them, millions upon millions of fans declaring a completely validated law of physics invalid, and a guy running the show who has been completely inconsistent and over the top. And a 140 character tweet that had bad info in it from a “source”

  53. PhD scientist here…

    the rule book needs to specify that the football pressure needs to be 12.5-13.5 psi WHEN IT IS MEASURED AT ROOM TEMPERATURE.

    Because… pressure drops as temperature drops, people. It is a reality of science.

    12.5 psi @ 72F will go to
    11.5 psi @ 52F, will go to
    13.5 psi @ 92F

    ALL WITH NO TAMPERING!
    ——————————————————————–

    Reportedly, the Colts balls were tested to be at the correct pressure at halftime. Maybe THEY are the ones that need investigation. Were their’s OVER-inflated before the game? Luck now has no comment on if he prefers balls over or under inflated.

  54. “The NFL has suspended the laws of physics for violating league policy and compromising the integrity of the game. We must protect the Shield.”

  55. Qbs already put the amount if air they want. Didnt you see what jeff blake said.

    I think its time to end this witch hunt. Unless u in the media are gonna try to convict mother nature

  56. I swear the Masters of the Site are getting dumber and dumber. Every game should be played with one set of footballs prepared and maintained by disinterested officials. Period. End of story.

    Pretty soon you’ll have them tying ribbons on ’em so they look prettier in flight.

  57. they banned stickum well then lets get rid of the stickum gloves……there needs to be an investigation into the underflated ball that beckham jr caught with those gloves…

  58. I heard mike florio is convinced mother nature works for belichick and they conspired together to make it rain that day, deflate the balls And use jedi mind tricks to stop all 30 other nfl teams from picking up blount

  59. No, of course not, making the ball easier to grip would no way affect the integrity of the game.
    No more than expanding the size of the racquet head affected the integrity of tennis. Or making driver heads the same size as the ones on toddlers’ plastic toy clubs affected the integrity of golf.

  60. allpatriots writes:

    PhD scientist here…

    the rule book needs to specify that the football pressure needs to be 12.5-13.5 psi WHEN IT IS MEASURED AT ROOM TEMPERATURE.

    Because… pressure drops as temperature drops, people. It is a reality of science.

    12.5 psi @ 72F will go to
    11.5 psi @ 52F, will go to
    13.5 psi @ 92F

    ALL WITH NO TAMPERING!

    If this is true, then a game played in 12 degree temperatures would result in a ball at 9.5 psi. And colder temperatures would produce even more deflated footballs.

    This means that the footballs in cold-weather games would quickly become unplayable, and would have to be continually inflated throughout the game.

    Yet I’ve watched hundreds of cold-weather games, and I’ve never heard an announcer point out that the footballs deflate quickly and have to be continually inflated on the sideline.

  61. I’m ok with making an adjustment, but the fans saying just let it be whatever pressure the QB want, are out of touch. There has to be a minimum and maximum, and stop talking about it just benefiting the QBs, it also benefits the RBs when it’s under inflated. Its easier for them to squeeze the football and less chance of fumbling. Personally I still enjoy defense, I’m old, it’s what I grew up with when I watched NFL games. The league is already making every possible rule they can to benefit the offense. The last thing I want is to start watching arena football league scores in the NFL. Adjust the pressure if you want, within reason.

  62. Maybe u should watch more then. Players have said in cold weather games the ball is hard as a rock and in some cases the ball becomes almost flat. But there is a curve of where the rate of pressure lost changes. Also, im sure in cold weather games they may inflate the ball in a colder environment

  63. Less of a chance of fumbling was proven wrong.
    1.5 psi drop is the equivelant of 1 mm more of surface to hold on to. Saying its easier to squeeZe is nuts.

  64. Deflate-hate, Fellate-gate, or whatever you want to call it, needs to go away. Hopefully this has not interfered with game preparations to the point it deteriorates the game tomorrow. This is a sign of the end times….

  65. Black Dog says:
    Jan 31, 2015 6:31 PM
    allpatriots writes:

    PhD scientist here…

    the rule book needs to specify that the football pressure needs to be 12.5-13.5 psi WHEN IT IS MEASURED AT ROOM TEMPERATURE.

    Because… pressure drops as temperature drops, people. It is a reality of science.

    12.5 psi @ 72F will go to
    11.5 psi @ 52F, will go to
    13.5 psi @ 92F

    ALL WITH NO TAMPERING!

    If this is true, then a game played in 12 degree temperatures would result in a ball at 9.5 psi. And colder temperatures would produce even more deflated footballs.

    This means that the footballs in cold-weather games would quickly become unplayable, and would have to be continually inflated throughout the game.

    Yet I’ve watched hundreds of cold-weather games, and I’ve never heard an announcer point out that the footballs deflate quickly and have to be continually inflated on the sideline.
    *******************************************************

    The balls don’t deflate. It’s just that the colder temperature affects the pressure/volume side of the equation. The lower the temperature, the lower the pressure. My guess would be yes, if it got cold enough, the football would get soft, but my understanding is it is hard to tell the difference between a football at 10 psi and one at 13 psi. It’s kind of like my nards. The colder it gets….well…..you know….

  66. Time for a pats fan to vent.

    1. Spygate – The penalty was for filming from field level and not stealing signals. Every team was and still is permitted to film the other teams signals from designated areas. Spygate is a poor choice of words generated by a hostile media. Is filming out in the open really spying. Should of been called arrogancegate because that is what Belichick and the Pats were penalized for.

    2. Deflategate – It is obvious that NFL officials did not monitor ball pressure as they should have. There is no proof or for that fact any studies ever done on the effect of conditions on the ball pressure. Yet to appease the haters the NFL presses on. Does anyone really trust the officials or nfl offices to be compentent.

    3. Other teams – Let’s take the Seahawks who have led the league for 3 years in PED issues. Yes I know that players on every team most likely do it but this team seems to have more than most. And also the incredible noise of their fans.
    Like Indy it appears that perhaps the noise is pumped up somehow. Both these things have more effect on a game then perhaps a little less air in a ball.

  67. “This means that the footballs in cold-weather games would quickly become unplayable”-blackdog

    No, while a football at 12 degrees will indeed be about 9.5 psi,

    It would not be unplayable, because as the leather ball gets cold the leather surface gets very stiff and incompressible, which MORE than makes up for the lower psi.

    A 9.5 psi football at 12F might even feel HARDER than a 12.5 psi football at 72F

    The announcers always say before a cold game “catching that ball out there today is like catching a rock”

    But you don’t have to trust me. Pump up a football at room temp, put it in the fridge for 2hrs, check psi, then put it in the freezer for 2 hrs and check psi

    The great thing about science is that it makes testable predictions, so GO FOR IT!

    -PhD scientist

  68. It will be weird if the NFL penalizes the Pats for this minutiae, and then they go ahead and change the pressure specs on the ball anyway to allow more leeway for the QB’s. It makes sense to me to change the rule a little bit – I don’t have big hands so I have trouble gripping footballs and throwing them, yet I can knock a squirrel off of a bird feeder from 25 yards out with a baseball. I wouldn’t mind being able to do it with a football. If they are going to require that all QB’s play with the same size ball, then they should require that all quarterbacks play with the same size hands, too.

  69. Let teams and players decide how much air they want in the footballs. No limit either way except for kickers. Simple.

    Then again, without controversy most of the fans who post on this website would probably lose interest.

    Personally, I don’t want to see the NFL and the reporting of the NFL to turn into a soap opera mixed with a magazine that claims Elvis was abducted by aliens. That is kind of what the NFL is turning into with all the rumor mill nonsense and soap opera reporting on it. It is ridiculous.

  70. They could solve this whole thing quite quickly. The NFL supplies the balls for the game, none of this nonsense of each team getting to decide what they want to use and prepare the balls. If you are good QB it shouldn’t matter what football you are using.

  71. I don’t expect this to happen but can we stop with the “WHAT ABOUT THE COLTS” FOOTBALLS?!?!” question?

    Nobody knows anything about those footballs.

    There’s no official report that they were or were not legal.

    No report about how they were prior to the game or half time.

    No report about Luck’s preferred weight.

    They can’t be a control or comparison.

    A ball will deflate due to temperature – it’s a fact. 0.5PSI/1PSI/2PSI… who knows? I’m not going to pretend to have done experiments.

    No-one has any idea how much they actually deflated BECAUSE THE REFS CAN’T DO THEIR JOBS. Goodell should apologize to Kraft, Belichick, Brady and all the fans of the NFL. He has made a mockery of our favourite sport.

    I expect Kraft to start the process of forcing him to resign because I can’t remember the last time he actually did anything right.

  72. If each team can have a ball the way they want, then who cares how much air is in it? Its not like the Patriots are forcing footballs on to the other team that they aren’t used to handling.

    “…maybe all quarterbacks should be given the option to put whatever amount of air in the balls they desire.”

    Seems like they already do if all of them have a preference for one way or the other…

    On the other hand, did anybody check those balls for helium or nitrogen, how do we know it was regular air? Maybe all your calculations on air pressure this or that are screwed because you don’t know what was in the ball in the first place…

  73. IMO QBs should be allowed to do whatever they want with the balls within reason to get them how they want em. This issue is being way overblown and it’s getting ridiculous. If Aaron Rodgers can overinflate the footballs why is it a problem for Tom Brady to want em under inflated? Cause it’s really looking as if its only because its Tom Brady and the Patriots. If it were Russell Wilson would this be a story?

  74. 2001
    2003
    2004
    2014 (?)

    Not a single asterisk in sight, anywhere

    Denver should have asterisks for illegally secret payments made to Elway and others to circumvent the salary cap, but not the Patriots

  75. What patriot fans don’t understand is the patriots cheated by breaking the rule. Doesn’t matter how it happened or what benefits they did or did not get from it. They knew the rule and broke it. Just like spygate. Doesn’t matter who was or was not doing it. They got caught and they had to pay a small price because Goodell and Krafts friendship. Patriot fans for some reason don’t understand this for some reason. IT’S EASY TO UNDERSTAND.

  76. So, changing the issue that all teams offenses play with footballs they provide is off the table?
    I think thats a bigger issue than the PSI of the footballs.
    The League should provide ALL game balls, IMO.

  77. Mike Kensil and Roger Goodell have done more to damage the integrity of the NFL in the last two weeks than any other people in the history of the NFL.

    Mike Kensil fabricated this controversy and leaked the non story to Bob (Gladys) Kravitz the Colts cheerleader. The idiot obviously didn’t think it through; you know, science got in the way, too bad Kensil and Kravitz.

    Goodell allowed Kensil to set up this foolish sting, and still can’t set it straight. How can he possibly be worth what he is paid?

    I hope Mr. Kraft and the other owners get rid of these two cancers as quickly as possible.

  78. shs92 says:
    Jan 31, 2015 4:47 PM
    All this concern regarding psi but, I think, no standards for receivers gloves.

    How about the neoprene sleeves that new HOFer, Jerome Bettis, used to wear? Really cut down on fumbles….

  79. It doesn’t matter why the rule is there, it matters that it clearly IS there. Anything outside that is homerism and denial.

    Next time you are caught speeding just tell a cop the limit is stupid and you feel it should be faster. Let us know how that worls for you

  80. “What patriot fans don’t understand is the patriots cheated by breaking the rule. ”

    —–Making it 50 degrees outside is against the rules?

    “Doesn’t matter how it happened ”

    ——I think it was a warm front

    “They knew the rule and broke it.”

    ——-Dang, we have to build a DOME?

    PV=nRT-gate

  81. It will be weird if the NFL penalizes the Pats for this minutiae

    Also weird because they seemingly didn’t document the pressures at any time.

    We’re going on hearsay, and it seems quite a few people have an agenda when it comes to New England. I don’t trust a damn bit of the information that’s been leaked.

  82. On the other hand, did anybody check those balls for helium or nitrogen, how do we know it was regular air? Maybe all your calculations on air pressure this or that are screwed because you don’t know what was in the ball in the first place…
    ====

    1) Those gasses are ideal gasses as well.
    2) Air is more than 70% nitrogen anyway.
    3) Even a ball filled with heliu would only be a couple of grams lighter in a 425 g object.

  83. It doesn’t matter why the rule is there, it matters that it clearly IS there. Anything outside that is homerism and denial.

    Next time you are caught speeding just tell a cop the limit is stupid and you feel it should be faster. Let us know how that worls for you
    ====

    This is more like a cop pulling you over for speeding while you’re going 35 in a 35 but he saw you doing 55 on the freeway.

  84. gammynomnom says:
    Jan 31, 2015 8:41 PM
    It doesn’t matter why the rule is there, it matters that it clearly IS there. Anything outside that is homerism and denial.

    Next time you are caught speeding just tell a cop the limit is stupid and you feel it should be faster. Let us know how that worls for you

    If you get a speeding ticket, you pay the fine and keep on driving. No suspension, no “asterisk” next to your name. Just a minor violation. The world doesn’t end… No big deal.

  85. When I find myself
    In times of trouble
    Mother Mary comes to me
    Speaking words of wisdom
    Let it be, let it be…

    All right Mr. Belichick, Mr. Brady.. Mr. Wilfork, you too. Mr. Edelman, Mr. Amendola, Mr. Blount and Mr. Revis and friends… you too Mr. Lafell… we’re all holding our breath here back in New England – everything is now officially unfolding in slow motion. The next 20 hours or so are going to take forever. Go on, men. Shut them all up now. You can DO it.

  86. I must be dumber than anyone on this blog because I read all the posts primarily to see if the stupid posts would stop….. but they keep on coming. I don’t know if I should be laughing or crying. What’s really funny is how most of the Anti-Patriot comments don’t have a clue about true facts beginning with “Spygate” but they have the ficton part of Blount, PSI and the immaturity of name calling down Pat (No pun intended).

  87. This should have been the question from the start

    It’s known that few if any QBs want a ROCK HARD football

    That being the case, why is the NFL FORCING them to play with that?

    And as we now know from multiple QB sources, there’s been deflation going on for decades, meaning all QBs had an even playing field to play with a ball the way they preferred

    Why would the NFL consider it a BAD THING to allow QBs to play with the ball inflation of preference?

    Does Major League Baseball prohibit players from using broken in gloves?

  88. Tomorrow we will find out if everything is right with the world. For those who believe the Pats cheated, that will be a Seattle win. For those that believe the Pats have been wrongly accused, that will be a Pats win – and that may not be enough.

    For people that aren’t a fan of either team, this is what it may come down to. It isn’t just ironic that current polls show more votes for Seahawks than the Pats; this isn’t supported by the respective fan bases.

    All I know is that if I was wrongly accused of something, I’d be really pissed off. So, that edge goes to the Pats. The league, however, wants things to be clean. I’m interested in watching how well the officials call the game. I’m not a conspiracy theorist, but it wouldn’t be a stretch for such a game to have “influence” such as a really bad pass interference call that can’t be reviewed (that treatment needs to change, by the way, it should be reviewable). We will see how it all plays out. I’m hoping the NFL isn’t as screwed up as it appears to be.

    I think everyone agrees that the NFL could’ve handled this better. With the lack of facts, we don’t know who is to blame for the deflated balls. There are simply too many possibilities unless you strongly desire a single possibilty. Some people have been quick to jump on just that.

    The entire affair is a fairly sad statement of our society. We are fortunate to live in a country that prides itself on due process. We believe in the best of people, which is why we believe capitalism works. Other countries that assume people will act badly, believe that power needs to be taken away from people. These take the form of suppressing capitalism in favor of monarchies, dictatorships, communism, marxism, etc.

    So, for those who are rooting against the Pats because they assume they cheated, I’d simply ask them to be more American. Postpone judgement until the facts are there. If it turns out they were guilty, I’m sure they will be punished, but it won’t effect tomorrow’s game. I, for one, just hope for a good football game.

  89. I wonder if anybody has asked Johnny Football how he likes his footballs. Or Geno Smith. Or Christian Ponder. Or even Jimmy Garappalo. It must suck if the backup hates the way the starter likes the football.

    The point is like that other poster said; it’s Tom Brady and the Pats. Geno Smith sucked so bad that no matter how he liked his footballs, it wasn’t helping one bit.

    Maybe Mark Sanchez needs to look into the inflation issue, maybe then he won’t have another butt fumble.

  90. The Illegal 20-Yard Swing in the Pats-Ravens Game

    Despite the attention heaped on deflategate, the bigger scandal of the playoffs will end up having been the refs mishandling of the Patriots eligibility-aided drive against the Ravens.

    Proper enforcement of the rules would have penalized the Patriots for 5 yards. Add that 5 to the 15 yard penalty that the Ravens took to call attention to the scheme and that’s a 20-yard swing on a scoring drive in a very close game.

    No one, including PROFOOTBALLTALK.COM, appears to have held the refs to the standards laid out in the NFL’s 2012 POINTS OF EMPHASIS, which specifically address the situation that occurred in the Patriots-Ravens game. Everyone, including PROFOOTBALLTALK.COM, has taken the refs at their word without much scrutiny. The refs still seem confused about how to handle this situation. If they looked at the 2012 POINTS OF EMPHASIS, the answer is right there.

    The cold logic here includes two points and one extrapolation.

    1. FACT: It was widely reported that Shane Vereen on at least one play reported his ineligibility just before the snap on the drive.

    2. FACT: Players wearing numbers that don’t qualify them for their position must report to the referee “BEFORE ENTERING THE HUDDLE.” And if a player fails to properly report his change in eligibility, “IT WILL RESULT IN A 5-YARD PENALTY FOR ILLEGAL SUBSTITUION.”

    3. EXTRAPOLATION: If the refs had thrown the flag, Harbaugh would not have gotten the unsportsmanlike conduct. That’s the 20-yard swing on a scoring drive.

    Here is the portion of the 2012 points of emphasis:
    The committee also reviewed the procedures for an offensive player who comes into the game wearing a number that does not qualify him for the position he takes. These players must report to the referee, before entering the huddle. The referee and umpire will then report the same to the defensive team.

    This rule prevails whether a player is already in the game or is an entering substitute and whether it is a play from scrimmage, an attempted field goal, or a try after a touchdown. If a player fails to report his change in eligibility, it will result in a 5-yard penalty for illegal substitution.

    Clearly no one wants to talk about this. Not the Patriots certainly, not the NFL refs (who are still confused about how to handle this issue) and not the Ravens (who in retrospect should have called a timeout.) But that doesn’t change the fact that if the refs had handled it properly, the outcome might have been different.

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