Chris Borland retires after one season

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When linebacker Patrick Willis unexpectedly retired last week, some 49ers fans took solace in the presence of linebacker Chris Borland, who had a stellar rookie season.

Now, Borland is retiring, too.

Via ESPN’s Outside The Lines, Borland says he’s calling it quits after one season due to concerns over the long-term impact of head injuries.

“I just honestly want to do what’s best for my health,” Borland said.  “From what I’ve researched and what I’ve experienced, I don’t think it’s worth the risk. . . .

“I feel largely the same, as sharp as I’ve ever been, for me it’s wanting to be proactive.  I’m concerned that if you wait [until] you have symptoms, it’s too late. . . .  There are a lot of unknowns.  I can’t claim that ‘X’ will happen.  I just want to live a long healthy life, and I don’t want to have any neurological diseases or die younger than I would otherwise.”

Borland said it wasn’t an easy decision, given his success last year.

“I’ve thought about what I could accomplish in football, but for me personally, when you read about Mike Webster and Dave Duerson and Ray Easterling, you read all these stories and to be the type of player I want to be in football, I think I’d have to take on some risks that as a person I don’t want to take on,” Borland said.

Borland said he believed he suffered a concussion in training camp, but he played through it because he wanted to make the team.  As the season progressed, he became more concerned about the issue.

As a third-round pick in 2014, Borland signed a four-year contract with a $617,436 signing bonus.  The 49ers have the right to recover 3/4th of that amount ($463,077).

Borland joins linebacker Jason Worilds and quarterback Jake Locker as players who have retired in the past week under the age of 30.

200 responses to “Chris Borland retires after one season

  1. I’m glad for the player. That he chose his own health over the cash grab. Hopefully he graduated and can go on and do other things. Let’s face it. The 49ers had all this stuff coming to them.

  2. All the information is out there… If someone wants to walk away, then good for them.

    My only question is why now? The info on concussions has been out for several years and he willingly played through high school and college… But when it’s time to actually earn a living doing it, now you’re not willing to “risk it”? I wonder if there is more to the story.

    Strange logic but to each his own…

  3. I knew the 49ers would be bad next year, but at this rate they won’t even have enough players to field a team!

    Who’s got it better than us? Who doesn’t?!

  4. ok super smart kid. I wish I had the brains and the heart he does. I could care less about my long term furure, for a few 100 grand I would put my head through a concrete wall.
    But like I said, If I had what he had upstairs I would do the same….

  5. WOW i’m shocked! he had such a promising outlook but it’s his decision. Good luck in life Chris!

  6. There comes a point when it shouldn’t be called retiring, like if you played in the league for a season or two. It’s called quitting. I do t understand it.

  7. As a 49ers fan this hurts especially bad after Willis. But as a person, damn you have to respect this your man for doing what was right for him and his future. Best of luck to him.

  8. Its pretty obvious NO ONE wants to be associated with that organization anymore! Dr. York, Denise Debartolo, Jed York and Baalke. The ship has SUNK!!!!

  9. Niners can’t catch a break … Maybe the niners will get some good news and Krap will retire next

  10. Wow. Willis was a surprise, but Borland retiring is an absolute shocker to me. Was so excited to see what he could do in the league.

  11. Can’t blame him. Not an easy decision to make, especially with that money on the line. Tough blow for the 49ers but best of luck in life Chris.

  12. That was the flood gates opening. If a really young guy with that much promise does it, and leaves that much money on the table, you’ll be seeing a lot of players following suit now.
    Wow.

  13. THIS ^^^^

    Will not only have reverberation in SF, but also in NY NFL head offices. They have to find a way to keep it out of the news.

    Because imagine the parents out there hearing this news.

    WOW!

  14. Saweet..please don’t change your mind. This just keeps getting better and better.

  15. Wow.
    No amount of cash can restore your health. Smart move by the kid. Maybe money isn’t a big deal to him and his family (i.e., they’re well off).
    The more info becomes available, and the more we learn how the league has intentionally withheld information and been outright deceitful about brain injuries, the more we will see people walk away from the game.
    I honestly think the violence inherent in football will be its demise. If the league still exists in 20 years I will be surprised. IF it does still exist, it will look very different.

  16. I’ve got nothing, i think we are done. This has been the worst off season ever and the first game is 6 months away!! Please save our Niners somebody anybody!!

  17. You can’t put a dollar amout on someone’s health! Sad that a young athlete has to make that decision.

  18. Dang, Starting to feel a little bad for niner fans ………………………………………………………………………………….Just kidding.

    #WhatHappened
    #To
    #QuestForSix

  19. Wow thats a shame, because as a Badgers fan, I really think he had what it takes to be a VERY good LB maybe similar to a Z. Thomas career.

    Good luck in whatever lies ahead.
    On Wisconsin.

  20. WHOA. Thats huge! But, it is football, its a mans game. Next man up.

    And to pre-empt people saying “Its the end of football”, nonsense. I know countless semi-pro ballers that play hard for zero money, for the love of the game. This concussion stuff might eventually water down the product, but there will always be football players, so there will always be football.

    Good for Chris Borland though, would have been fun to watch him play, but I’m sure his kids want to see him grow old even more. And at the end of the day that is whats important here. Good luck in life Chris, you obviously have a good head on your shoulders and are smart enough to want to keep it there, much respect!

  21. Chris is a very intelligent and articulate guy. I have followed his great career being a fellow Badger.

    I respect his decision as a carefully thought out decision, weighing the plus and minus factors. He could have a very fine player in the NFL and made a ton of money. He felt it was not worth the risk and I cant blame him.

    Thanks for the great years at UW Chris, and the very best to you and your future career choices.

  22. Wow. I thought this was some sort of April Fools come early. Crazy. I hate to think that football is going to go the way of heavyweight fighting, with a drying up of real talent, only the dreck staying in the game. That, or they puss-ify the game to such an extent that there’s no more intensity to it.

  23. WOW! Make’s you wonder if there is more going on the 49er camp than what people think, but good for him then.

  24. Something is just not right here with the 49ers.

    You don’t see three guys retiring from one team like this.

    Justin smith somewhat makes sense but I feel he could play at a high level for a year or two more.

    Willis had injuries but was the best ilb in the leg for a long time. Bowman was injured too yet he didn’t retire.

    And now Borland who just had a stellar rookie year and who they need big time.

    It doesn’t add up. I wouldn’t be shocked if they lost the love of the game after the way harbaugh their coach was treated by their own organization.

  25. People are made different. Some football players go all out throughout their whole careers knowing the consequences having that YOLO mindset, while some players feel the same way Borland does. Can’t fault somebody either way. Football is a tough and dangerous sport.

  26. Exactly why the NFL hid this from the players all these years. Sooner or later, players wise up and select life over limb.

  27. Wow. I thought this was some sort of April Fools come early. Crazy. I hate to think that football is going to go the way of heavyweight fighting, with a drying up of real talent, only the dreck staying in the game. That, or they wuss-ify the game to such an extent that there’s no more intensity to it.

  28. Anyone else see the 49’ers now trading down to acquire more picks or do they keep #15 or wherever it is their drafting?

  29. For the human side of this, if he didn’t want to be playing, I’m glad he’s going because I don’t want to see someone hurt, especially going half speed. From that point of view, have a good life Chris.

    As a 49er fan, I’m sorry to say the last straw has came and gone. Good riddance if you don’t want to be there. The franchise has taken blow after blow the last week. Listen to me Jed York — I’m a 30-year Niner fan. I AM SICK OF THIS. Some of it is out of your hands; some of it was not. Undermine your own coach? I guess this is the karma that cones with it.

    This hurts badly. So stunned don’t know what to say.

  30. Unbelievably mature decision for such a young and talented player. Great respect for him. With that sort of level-headedness, and at such a young age, he could easily go into the business world and have enough time to start a promising and fruitful career. Or, start coaching high school or small college football; with some success, patience and time, he could wind-up back in the NFL as a coach or front office guy.

  31. i bet this guy was already wealthy to start but didn’t get a scholarship in college beat all the odds to him but wasn’t just for the head hits, guy didn’t need the money for sure if so all the power to him.

  32. FlashPatterson says:
    Mar 16, 2015 10:34 PM
    Hope he doesn’t get older and regret this. There’s a lot more money to be made in the NFL than out of it.
    _____________________

    Its only money I know it ranks high on importance on many peoples list, but family, physical, mental, and spiritual health should all be more important than that.

  33. My hat is off toyyou mr borland. With that being said nobody has had a worse off season than the ninera. Willis, crabtree, borland, iupati, harbaugh, fangio. Yikes. This team could be bad.

  34. All I can say is, damn that sucks. Hate to see anyone get their career cut short. Hope whatever he does next works out for him.

  35. Will not be surprised if the NFL releases the deflategate investigation report now. Anything that would take up news cycles over this issue that the mighty NFL fears the most .

  36. He comes from a middle class environment. Not all can make this choice this soon. I think 5 years is a lot of hitting if you count college years. NFL will not be on top much longer, Bread and Circuses

  37. Is it just me or is anyone else thinking something is fishy about all these retirements. Is this not a way to get out of a contract, step away for a year or two and then come back with the team you want to?

  38. Pretty pathetic the haters making fun of SF for a guy making a choice to not risk potential future issues. Laugh all you want winners

  39. As an ex pro boxer, I have seen this a lot . Guys rise through the amateur ranks as the big dog and finally get a taste of real pain in the pros. It is his life and his decision. Personally , I’m glad the world is still full of warriors that will put it on the line or my 2 favorite sports would be no more….

  40. Maybe start monitoring what these players are pumping into their bodies. Human beings don’t achieve that type of size, speed and power on their own.

    Whatever they do, they better do it fast. Participation in youth football is taking massive hits. Now the NFL is not only losing their future, they’re losing their present. Be prepared for even more contact to be legislated out of the game.

  41. Jason Worilds retired because he thought that he heard God tell him to retire. He misunderstood. God was talking to Steven A. Smith.

    Jake Locker retired as soon as he signed that big rookie contract. The ubiquitous draft profile on Locker was “talented athlete who lacks passion for the game.” As long as the Titans are paying for scouts, they might actually want to read the scouting reports.

    Borland retired for the right reason – to maintain his health – and it would be great news if Wes Welker and Jordan Cameron and so many others who suffer chronic concussions would reach the same wise conclusion.

  42. Does anyone else see what’s going here? He is going to retire for a year to void his contract with the 49ers. He’s then gonna come back young and healthy at age 25 as a free agent with the ability to sign with any team he wants.
    Betting Willis is doin the same thing, no wants to be part of that rebuilding mess out west.

  43. This will be the new trend for NFL players getting out early for their health . And who could blame anyone for choosing their health. And the NFL doesn’t even know what a catch is these days. Don’t ask them about CTE.

  44. the line about not being willing to do the things necessary to be the kind of player he’d want to be is as real as it gets. respect that a lot more than taking a paycheck and not giving it your all.

    everyone acting like the NFL is going anywhere is overreacting, though. for every guy who puts his long term health first, there are hundreds who will continue putting their bodies on the line.

  45. Well, you have to admire his conviction. He isn’t willing to take the chance of permanently damaging his health to cash out for two more years when his rookie contract expires and he’s made enough to live out the rest of his life fairly comfortably. Most players define long term thinking as “when my current contract expires and I can get another deal”. Good for him; I suspect that in 40 years he won’t regret this decision.

    Also, this has to make Goodell nervous that a trend will emerge and pick up steam. Which is awesome. That’s what you get for trying your best to destroy professional football you arrogant doofus.

  46. Some annoying niner fan was yelling in my ear at a game this past year ( vs NYG) and rubbing it in how the Niners breed the best LBs and how smart of a franchise they were. I’d like to see him reading or hearing this news for a good laugh. Had the laugh anyway.

  47. Yikes, I’m not sure if I am more afraid this trend will end football as I know it or if I’m more afraid it won’t. Thank goodness for hockey and other sports.

  48. Before drafting guys they need to start asking about their concerns. Not sure if this could have been avoided in the “interviewing” process.

    I hate the Niners and love when they lose…but they shouldn’t lose a 3rd round pick like this.

  49. Translation: I’m a 3rd round pick that greatly outplayed my draft position and now I’m going to be a starter for 3 years, taking a lot of punishment and potentially life-altering damage and the risk isn’t worth my health if I can’t really cash in till I can get to free agency in 3 years. So, since I can’t hold out without stiff penalties under the newest CBA, this is what I have to do in order to negotiate a new contract.

  50. Anybody who calls it quits this early had thoughts before he even entered the league. So why did he wait til after this year? Why be dishonest with his employers?

    It’s clear he was in it to make a quick dime then get out. Otherwise he’d of done when he was having second thoughts in college.

    Sorry you don’t agree with me, but I’d have more respect for him if he had done it before collecting a check dishonestly.

  51. Seeing Borland retire, for the reasons he professed, seems like it may actually help the NFL’s legal case — in this way.

    Borland essentially stated that he shut it down out of an awareness of the risks involved. Perhaps, the NFL can lean on this event as one illustration to support the contention that the players now are aware that there are health risks and considerations each athlete/prospective employee may contemplate prior to moving forward — and further, that those who choose to do so henceforth, did so with an awareness of the known risks coupled with a voluntary assumption of those risks.

    This is not taking a stand on the issues, either way. It’s just looking at how the NFL could contend the VAST majority of players play in spite of the now-more-fully-known risks, and thus bear responsibility when they willingly assume those risks.

  52. I love all the ignorant comments from all the haters insinuating that Willis and now Borland retiring have something to do with the front office issues . These guys are retiring not demanding to be traded . This is a NFL problem not a 49er problem .

  53. This is why they dumped Harbaugh; no regard for player safety.

    Carroll sat Avril in the Superbowl even though it cost us the game.

    Carroll and Seattle are the class of the NFL.

  54. I can’t say I have an issue with his decision but he isn’t retiring. He’s quitting. That’s allowed but it is what it is.

  55. Hey Borland you could also get injured, even severally, driving to the game. You made the right choice to quit and not take the 99.9% chance that you’ll be just fine. Can’t be too careful.

  56. The NFL will turn into a game which would be better described as “Field Basketball”.

    No contact, no tackling.

  57. Gotta respect his decision. I’m sure it was tough, but he’s thinking about his long-term life. Maybe for some people the glory and money for a few years are worth the risk of a lifetime of pain and possibly not living as long, but he obviously feels otherwise.

    That said….Quest for Six New Starters.

  58. Really enjoyed watching him play.
    Sad thing is the people commending him for this decision are also probably the ones complaining the NFL is becoming soft.
    The reality is that the human body isn’t designed to play football. With players getting larger, faster and stronger, the league needs to take precautions to keep its players healthy and the game alive.

    Just my two cents.

  59. What a shame. Glad he’s taking the long view and not jeopardizing his future well-being. Traumatic brain injury is real; our understanding of it is only beginning to catch up.

  60. realitycheckbaby says: Mar 16, 2015 11:17 PM

    Carroll sat Avril in the Superbowl even though it cost us the game.

    Carroll and Seattle are the class of the NFL.
    ————————————————————–
    I think you need a new name. Coaches like Carroll don’t make that decision; the medical stuff determines if the player is cleared to return or he cannot go back in.

  61. Hey Borland,

    Congratulations on choosing your long term health over a short term career.

    Please go and talk some sense into Welker who currently has Mush on the Brain.
    See if you convince Wes to donate his brain to research when he passes on. No doubt it will be like noodle soup.

  62. He may have retired for the right reason…..My question to him would be: if you are just now realizing what danger there is playing in the NFL, why would you have felt compelled to play through last preseason’s concussion?

  63. Anyone making comparisons between the risks of driving a car and playing in the NFL is truly clueless. This is just the beginning of a much larger trend. The majority of NFL players last only a few short years and earn much less than the star players. A lot of these guys are going to be more aware of the big health risks and will be retiring early or never entering the draft.

    The quality of the league will be in a long-term decline.

  64. So I just read that Borland did receive a bachelors while at Wisconsin but he’s interested in going back for a Master’s in Sports Management, possibly to go into coaching. Maybe it’s just me but for him to take this stance, really, on the sport as a whole, then to pursue another way to ultimately profit off it (while other young men put themselves at risk) seems a little hypocritical. If he feels this sport is too dangerous for himself to play, then how could he even consider being an individual that will advocate for others to play it?

  65. This is why I’ve agreed with (most of) Goodell’s changes to make the game safer. The players are getting bigger and faster. More stuff is going to come out about the effects of the NFL game to the brain and the body. If they don’t make the game safer, one day somebody is going to die on the football field.

    Then watch how many parents pull their sons out of peewee football and put them into soccer.

  66. It is a brutal, brutal game. Sometimes I don’t think fans understand the pain and stress a player goes through. Players who reach this level
    are special athletes with great work ethic. Yes sometimes God does create a player who has so much natural ability that it is easier but even those players have to work to stay healthy . As a fan it is often frustrating to see a player have injuries. However I don’t think fans really understand how injuries often result from just bad luck.
    In recent years the injuries have seemed to increase more rapidly than ever. Look at he inside linebacker position ….it seems as if that position is becoming the most dangerous. Bowman, Willis, Cushing,
    Lee, Alonso the list continues.
    Borland has made his decision. I applaud his decision. The sad fact is that despite the above mentioned players efforts and dedication many fans criticize and demean. ” That player is made of glass”….despite the fact he sustained a very serious injury often by bad luck or his own teammates friendly fire. Can one imagine the stress behind it all? To see players like Tim Shaw diagnosed with ALS at age 29?
    The NFL needs to find a way to reduce the the injuries. Expanding rosters is one way. Perhaps extend the season by eliminating exhibition games thereby allowing two bye-weeks . This would allow
    players to recover and rest. There must be a better way.

  67. doe22us says: Mar 16, 2015 10:32 PM

    Well, hopefully he has that cash lying around, because they sure will be coming for it.
    ________________________________
    They could, but to be honest, I doubt they will. The kid was a rookie picked in the 3rd round. The amount they could recover is less than half a million. That’s chump change to them. Avoiding the press they’d get from going after the money after he quit over head trauma concerns is most likely more valuable to them than the money that they could recover. It’s in the best interest of everyone in the NFL to let this story fade away as soon as possible.

  68. Ever since you moved to Levi stadium its been a nightmare ..from coaches down to players..and I called it i said 2 years ago the new stadium wont be lucky for the 49ers…i almost feel bad for you guys…

  69. bcdc26 says: Mar 16, 2015 11:36 PM

    So I just read that Borland did receive a bachelors while at Wisconsin but he’s interested in going back for a Master’s in Sports Management, possibly to go into coaching. Maybe it’s just me but for him to take this stance, really, on the sport as a whole, then to pursue another way to ultimately profit off it (while other young men put themselves at risk) seems a little hypocritical. If he feels this sport is too dangerous for himself to play, then how could he even consider being an individual that will advocate for others to play it?
    __________________________________
    Not necessarily. There’s a whole new generation of coaches out there, working with younger players and trying to make the sport safer for them. For all we know, that could be his career goal.

  70. this might be more shocking that the willis retirement! what is going on this offseason!!?????????

    I think the NFL is in trouble!!!! this retirement will put them in full panic mode.

  71. It’s obvious he has never had money problems. Anybody that has would never walk away this early no matter the health risks. Poor people all over the world put their self in a lot more dangerous positions to make in a life time what he could make this year. Its privilege and entitlement run a muck. Hope he stays retired I wouldn’t want a guy like that representing my team.

  72. It’s the most brutal..beautiful sport in the world. .but it’s not for everyone. Only the toughest of the toughest can hack it. Enjoy your retirement. ..next man up!!!

  73. Retire “before” you receive the guaranteed portion of your contract, and than maybe I won’t think you’re just taking the money and running, and you know, not having to work for it. Give a 21 year old a million dollars and they think they’re set for life, I expect some of these players will be unretiring in a couple of years, if not sooner.

  74. It would have been at least two more seasons before he could make serous money. What good is money if you can’t enjoy it? The talent pool for the sport will ultimately start to suffer as we see this more often. Will always have people that will want to play but the game will suffer. Not too different than this country saw in boxing.

  75. Still think it’s not a big deal that these young guys are retiring? Like I said the other day on this, we’ll see how much you love your owner and uniforms because guys who once would have been superstars and are the reason we watch this game will be walking away routinely now after 7 or 8 year careers max after making a decent payday, and the guys who stick around will be the mediocre players who aren’t that good to begin with but will be elevated to take their places because somebody has to fill the voide. The owners are reaping what they sowed because they tried to brush the serious concussion issue aside and also because instead of sticking to their word and rewarding veterans, isnead they’re pushing them out the door for cheap youngsters, whether they’re ready to take the job or not, profit is the only motivator. The product has clearly suffered, and it will continue getting worse. Not to mention that you have all those moms who will now steer their children to sports like baseball and basketball if they can to save their kids from devestating head injuries. We’ll look back 25 years from now and remember that the league brought this on themselves as the product is in an unrecognizable, less popular state, and the equivalent of 2040 Sportscenter guy is asking what will it take to bring football back.

  76. I’m not a football player, just a middle-age dude. I did however suffer the mutha of all concussions a few years ago. It’s a life-changing event. I am literally not the same person. It’s as real as gets, and if a young man opts not to risk his SELF by playing football, hey, more power to him.

    Me at age 22 or whatever he is? I’d have taken the money and taken the hits.

  77. I have to agree with whatwhat2013. Borland said Marshawn Lynch was the hardest player he’d ever had to tackle. Clearly Marshawn knocked Borland clean out of the NFL.

  78. chawk12thman says:
    Mar 16, 2015 11:31 PM
    He may have retired for the right reason…..My question to him would be: if you are just now realizing what danger there is playing in the NFL, why would you have felt compelled to play through last preseason’s concussion?
    ______________________________
    Why did you do donuts in a parking lot when you were 16? its called maturity and mental growth. He realized after further experience and analysis that it wasnt worth it. SMH that this has to be explained

  79. To leave all that cash on the table is pretty remarkable. It would be interesting if the NFL network and mothership would blackball him from getting paid to be on TV/radio , to prevent other young men (concerned about their long term health) from following the same (very early retirement) path..

  80. Yeah we hear 24 and think wow so young but half the time kids start playing football with equipment at around 6-7 years old and it becomes not fun anymore and some of these players don’t need the money because of family situation

  81. I remember everyone crushing Ricky Williams when he abruptly retired after a 500 carry season. He seems like the smart one now.

  82. The rookie contract deal makes playing “not worth the risk”.

    The precedent has been set. Look for more guys to quit. The players won’t make the same kind of money. Maybe only half what the NFL pays them, but they can work a 9-5 job for as long as they want.

    Playing football, these guys are one play away from retiring anyway. If I were graduating college and had to pick between jobs that would give me either 3 years of employment (and good chance of an injury that’d cripple me in the future) or 40 years of employment, I’d take the 40 year job.

    If you think about it, who would go play a game where you get screwed for 3-4 years before you can start making the same money everyone else gets? Play along side a guy who makes 10 or 20 times more money than you do, doing the same job? If you find that acceptable it is because you aren’t smart enough to do anything else.

  83. Good luck to him, and it takes a real jackass to wish ill on someone just because you don’t like a decision they made about their life and health.

  84. A lot more people used to smoke cigarettes, but then the studies started coming in that linked smoking to cancer. Not everyone believes in science, but as time goes on more and more people start coming to their senses. Borland’s retirement is a shock to us today, but five to ten years from now we’ll probably be used to seeing more players leave the game. Obviously Borland believes in science. Some people will hate him just for that.

  85. rodvmunchiii says: Mar 16, 2015 11:20 PM

    Hey Borland you could also get injured, even severally, driving to the game. You made the right choice to quit and not take the 99.9% chance that you’ll be just fine. Can’t be too careful.

    “severally”????

    Perhaps you’ve taken a few too many hits to the head.

  86. Congrats Chris on having the courage to make the decision that is right for YOU. I hate seeing the guy go but I sure do have to respect him for doing what he thought is right.
    I am a Wisconsin fan (borland played there) and he also had a ton of shoulder issues in college that caused him to miss games as well. I do have wonder if that was a huge part of it as well.

  87. This guy said he’s been concussed a number of times and he knows his own body. These things add up to cause permanent damage in a lot of people.

    He didn’t want to end up on the wrong side of the odds. Way too much of life ahead for him for anyone to say he’s wrong.

    Go interview the dozens and dozens of guys who don’t fare so well after chronic concussions – they’re all the proof anyone needs.

    Hey kid…. “You were good.”

  88. The curse of “Hosting the Super Bowl” is striking again! Good luck Mr. Borland…For those of you who think he may try to “unretire” and sign with another team, the 49ers own his rights for the life of the (intended) original contract he signed.

  89. I don’t know much about this guy, did he have a lot of concussions last year, or in college?

    He made $600K last year, not so much that he could retire at 24. Good luck to him

  90. 5-6 years from now when he’s grinding away day-after-day in a crap job he’ll be wishing he’d have played for 5-6 years and got to that second contract.

    For a lot less money than these guys make I’d put an NFL helmet on and let people hit me in the head with a baseball bat if it meant only having to have a job for 6-8 years and being set for life.

  91. That dude was a stud and future star.. That one is gonna hurt… “Who’s got it better……” LOL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  92. All these retirements from the D in Santa Clara…and yet the biggest hole on the team is still found under Center…

  93. I don’t see this sort of thing having any impact on the NFL concussion issue. The NFL is an employer that profits tremendously from the work of the players. The players may know that they’re putting themselves at risk, but they choose to play anyway because it’s a chance to make a ton of money.

    It’s an employer/employee relationship, and player knowledge doesn’t mean that the league gets to absolve itself of responsibility for the health of its employees.

  94. Reminds me of Gladiator when he addresses the crowd: “Are you not entertained”. In the NFL though, you have a choice as to whether you will sacrifice your body for the entertainment and enrichment of others. You are used until you can’t go anymore. Then you go to the ol’ Gladiators home. Borland has a head on his shoulders and will live life on his terms, not others. I’d hire him in a minute.

  95. There comes a point when it shouldn’t be called retiring, like if you played in the league for a season or two. It’s called quitting. I do t understand it.
    ______________

    This same guy likely also rips the older players for filing lawsuits over concussions because they should have just retired sooner. But when somebody does that, then he’s a quitter.

  96. “Its privilege and entitlement run a muck. Hope he stays retired I wouldn’t want a guy like that representing my team.”

    This is completely idiotic & devoid of human compassion. If you decided to leave your day job as a mechanic, would it be my right to call you whining little Girl Scout who should just suck it up & fix cars, because you worked at my favorite service station?

  97. macjacmccoy says:
    Mar 17, 2015 12:09 AM
    It’s obvious he has never had money problems. Anybody that has would never walk away this early no matter the health risks. Poor people all over the world put their self in a lot more dangerous positions to make in a life time what he could make this year. Its privilege and entitlement run a muck. Hope he stays retired I wouldn’t want a guy like that representing my team.

    ——————————————————————

    Or maybe he didn’t buy into the false premise that football’s the only way to make a living.

    Borland’s situation shows the value of athletes treating themselves as more than a football-factory produced commodity that only knows football. Too many athletes and fans buy into that tunnel-visioned hogwash to the point where it becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy thanks to the spoonfed garbage education most get (that schools pretend is worth the same as the ones regular students get).

  98. Guess being that concerned about his safety, one thing he won’t be doing is joining the military, like the hero Pat Tillman did. Talk about opposite ends of the spectrum…

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