Georgia star Nick Chubb suffers gruesome knee injury

AP

Georgia running back Nick Chubb, a talented sophomore with an NFL future ahead of him, suffered a gruesome injury on the first play of today’s game at Tennessee.

Chubb took the ball and cut to the outside, where he was hit and knocked toward the sideline. As he landed on his feet out of bounds, his knee buckled underneath him and bent backward.

Medical staff immediately tended to Chubb on the sideline, and coaches and teammates attempted to comfort him as he wiped away tears. There was no immediate word on the nature of his injury, but given the way his knee bent and the way he reacted, it appears very, very serious.

The injury is sure to re-ignite the debate about the NFL’s rule forcing players to wait until three years after high school before they can enter the draft. That debate has focused mostly on Chubb’s fellow sophomore running back Leonard Fournette, but Chubb is also good enough to be playing in the NFL now.

Chubb was so good as a true freshman last year that when he took over for Georgia running back Todd Gurley (who missed some games with a suspension and then more with a serious knee injury of his own), Georgia’s offense didn’t miss a beat. Gurley was the 10th overall pick in this year’s draft, and although Chubb likely wouldn’t have gone that high, he surely would have been drafted if he had been in this year’s draft.

But the NFL wouldn’t allow Chubb to enter this year’s draft. His only choices were to play for free, or not to play at all. And now he’s suffered a gruesome injury before reaching his first NFL payday.

49 responses to “Georgia star Nick Chubb suffers gruesome knee injury

  1. Sucks to see a great player and guy go down like that, but take a lesson from Todd Gurley and come back stronger. And if I was fournette I put myself in a bubble next year

  2. Hate seeing this. Here’s to a speedy recovery for Chubb, sit out a year if you have to. Hope to see him tear it up on Sunday’s and get paid for it.

  3. Heal up soon Chubb. Best case scenario for Chubb is he’s drafted to the Vikings so he can sit and heal behind Adrian Peterson for a couple seasons until he’s ready to go. Whatever happens, good luck Chubb.

  4. Leaving before three years is non-starter. We’re talking one, maybe two players out of thousands who would be ready to leave after a year or two.

    A lot of immature talent is going to go wasted (and probably undrafted).

    More insurance policies seems like the best course of action.

  5. Calm down, it’s football, players get injured all the time. If the NFL allowed kids right out of high school, all you liberals would complain about “how unfair and unsafe it is for these young kids to play against grown men”. Nothing is perfect, get off your anti-NFL agenda and show some sympathy for this young kid.

  6. This is a sad story, but if the NFL starts letting guys in from right out of high school, it will ruin the NFL and college football. That’s what happened to the NBA. The NFL can make whatever rules it wants.

  7. Damn, sucks for Chubb. Last year it was Gurley, maybe Chubb can keep his spirits up seeing Gurley getting back in action and knowing that if he works hard he can get back too. After what happened with those two, Leonard Fournette would be wise to get the future earnings injury insurance now, declare for the draft and bubble wrap himself until April.

  8. And once they start allowing kids right out of high school, some hyper-talented under-educated 16 year old will make a case for dropping out and entering the NFL.

    Life is about more than making money.

    We already have enough moronic Greg Hardy’s in the league that somehow managed 3 years of college education and you think kids should be allowed to earn ridiculous NFL money even LESS prepared to enter the real world?

  9. mianfr says:
    Oct 10, 2015 4:13 PM
    Leaving before three years is non-starter. We’re talking one, maybe two players out of thousands who would be ready to leave after a year or two.

    A lot of immature talent is going to go wasted (and probably undrafted).
    ======

    Ridiculous. 95% of college players won’t play in the NFL regardless of when they leave. Let the players decide where they “waste” their talent. If they don’t want to go to school than they probably don’t belong there anyway.

    If you are so worried about talent being “wasted” (which I am sure you’re not, you just want to protect college football), get rid of rule that says players who declare for he draft can’t play college football anymore. Let them find out if anyone is willing to pay them and if not, let them go back to school.

    In other words, give them the same rights every other college student in the world has. Stop treating them like property.

  10. Let’s stop exaggerating the value of these players’ educations. The signing bonus alone could put a lot of players through school with their own money, and they’d have time to study more than the play book.

  11. So his career can be in jeopardy AFTER he gets signed for a million dollars instead of before? And then what? Out of the league without any shot at scholarship money at the age of 20 or 21? Sounds like an awesome solution…good grief.

  12. My support for the NFL’s waiting period waivers. On one had I get why its there, we don’t need a bunch of kids leaving college after one year and then not making it in the NFL and then what? But on the other hand if my son is in college and is offered the opportunity to leave college and take a job paying high 6 figures maybe 7 I would encourage him to take the job and if it doesn’t work out he could always go back and get his degree.

  13. That knee injury is of the variety that you might never come back to full strength from (ala lattimore). I really hope that’s not the case. McGahee came back after a gruesome knee injury. People comparing this to Gurley, this one was much worse…

  14. I love how an 18-year-old can sign up and join the army to kill foreigners yet isn’t “capable” of making a career choice in a sport. NCAA is truly despicable. Sad to see the NFL is more interested in free brand exposure for league player entrants than respecting a young man’s choice.

  15. The school isn’t handing out it’s limited scholarships to players who can’t play, and neither is the NCAA.

    Suffer a career-ending injury in college, kiss your “generous” free education goodbye.

  16. So a 6th round draft choice blows out a knee in training camp, gone with an injury settlement. Don’t think you are set for life, one year of college end up being another broke brother on the street. How about if you earn a degree than you can turn pro? You white people dont want smart young black men. Make them earn it in school first.

  17. No one owes these players anything.
    They make a choice to play the game, and in the process receive a free college education (& numerous other benefits). We are never promised tomorrow, just as no one who ever puts on a pair of shoulder pads is promised or entitled to an NFL career. That’s not the way life works.
    If the players don’t like the NFL’s 3 year removed rule, then maybe they can play for another professional league that has no such rule.

  18. He was hardly playing for free… He had a room and board, books and tuition scholarship.. and I was under the impression this site covered pro football.. guess I was wrong

  19. But the NFL wouldn’t allow Chubb to enter this year’s draft. His only choices were to play for free, or not to play at all. And now he’s suffered a gruesome injury before reaching his first NFL payday.
    ~~~~~~~
    This is one of the most myopic arguments in sports. There is not a single high school player in the country that can play in the NFL. The college exposure is what allows these kids to possibly make it to the NFL. These guys all agree to play football for the school in exchange for an education at a major school. The key word in that sentence is ‘play’ and that college education and the exposure they get from NCAA football are by no means ‘free’. The exposure leads to the NFL draft and, for many players, very lucrative endorsement deals.

    Any player on an athletic scholarship that chooses to not play due to injury fears should be kicked off the team, expelled from the school and required to immediately pay back any and all tuition benefits, housing costs, etc. The answer is to get injury insurance, not hide from the game they hope to profit from.

  20. If you change the rules just to allow 4-5 fr/so get drafted, you will ruin the lives other 100-200 kids who think they good enough for the NFL (but aren’t) who come out. Not only they won’t get a free education, they ruin their chance of actually getting drafted if they stayed in school and learning the game

  21. Could just as easily have happened his first play in the NFL. I don’t see how hurrying guys into a most challenging version of the game with harder hitting opponents is a better solution.

  22. claritysolution says:
    Oct 10, 2015 4:49 PM
    I love how an 18-year-old can sign up and join the army to kill foreigners yet isn’t “capable” of making a career choice in a sport. NCAA is truly despicable. Sad to see the NFL is more interested in free brand exposure for league player entrants than respecting a young man’s choice.
    _____________________________________
    Your comments about the NCAA and the NFL’s interests may be right. But comparing an 18-year-old’s decision to pursue sports to the decision an 18-year-old makes joining the military doesn’t hold up. No one joining the military gets to make any decisions about anything until after they have been broken from their immature past and rebuilt into a cohesive unit. Those excelling in sports go on to be the prima donnas they were trained to be from high school.

  23. Since you are posting college football articles on an NFL site, how about letting us post uncensored comments like you are able to do on College Football Talk and give us a chance to write direct responses to comments. Way better set up than here, of course this will probably be deleted like usual

  24. He could have dropped out and got a job until the NFL came calling. Don’t pretend these guys only choice is to stay as football slaves for the glory of the Alma Mater.

  25. halftimehighlights says:
    Oct 10, 2015 4:16 PM
    Calm down, it’s football, players get injured all the time. If the NFL allowed kids right out of high school, all you liberals would complain about “how unfair and unsafe it is for these young kids to play against grown men”. Nothing is perfect, get off your anti-NFL agenda and show some sympathy for this young kid.

    Complaining about complainers…..really frustrating bro.

  26. It would seem that tiered insurance policies would be the way to go. Maybe if you’re projected as a top 50 NFL pick, you could be eligible for some sort of supplemental insurance policy in case of severe injury. Thoughts and prayers for Chubb. However for every Gurley there are more Lattimores out there. A 4.4 RB is a top 50 pick; a 4.6 RB is a late rounder.

  27. So, this rule was collectively bargained by the players association and the nfl. The players association protects existing players not past or future. The nfl on the other hand needs to protect their minor league system – the ncaa. There is no benefit to either to change this rule.

  28. A truly gruesome injury, glad the sound wasn’t picked up. Would have been that broken crab leg sound you hear at your Joe’s Crab Shack. Can’t watch it a second time.

  29. There is no reason to change a rule for the masses that would only benefit a very tiny percentage. This is football. People get injured. Always have, always will.

    The last guy who got all of the hype to sit out was Clowney. Still waiting on that first sack, though. So let’s assume he sits out his last season before entering the draft, then using Russel Wilson Life Math ™, he is injured his rookie season. Then he has had 2 years of football pass him by. Does he recover from that? Does he recover now? Who knows.

    Chubb, Fournette, maybe they are the next great thing at running back. Just like Trent Richardson was going to be. And Curtis Enis. In the end, a remarkable talent like Gurley or Clowney are going to get their shot. Injury or not. But to pick a player or two per year and say that’s why we should change the rules for the other thousands just seems like a huge reach.

  30. blackman510 says:
    Oct 10, 2015 5:10 PM
    So a 6th round draft choice blows out a knee in training camp, gone with an injury settlement. Don’t think you are set for life, one year of college end up being another broke brother on the street. How about if you earn a degree than you can turn pro? You white people dont want smart young black men. Make them earn it in school first.

    Wow. Illiterate AND racist. Kudos.

  31. CFT Story + Axe To Grind = PFT Story!

    Seriously, there’s nothing about this that’s an NFL story except for PFT once again trying to turn it into one for their own convenience, pushing the same exact opinion they’ve pushed many times already.

  32. easy solution

    1) Everyone comes clean and admits that these folks are athletes first and students second.

    2) Once thats admitted scholarships become 1 year of tuition for each year played at the school to be used at a later time. Let these guys focus on their dream without the charade of getting an education. It isn’t their focus.

    3) Let them declare for the draft whenever. They get 3 days after the last day of the draft to go back to school regardless of when, where or if they get drafted.

    4) Once they go pro and are finished there for whatever reason they will have those scholarship years (however many years they played college ball) to fall back on.

  33. Badgers Nation wishes Nick Chubb all the best wishes !
    I saw a replay of that and my stomach turned. I can only hope it isn’t as bad an injury as it looked. I’m hoping he can rehabilitate well enough to come back and pick up where he left off. Fingers crossed for you man.

  34. Damaged talent with no hope of an NFL career? Sounds like a Browns draft pick.

    Where did Montario Hardesty go to school?

  35. It’s a hard argument to decide on. While I feel a handful of players might be able to jump from high school to the pros, most have not grown into their bodies by the time they have graduated high school.

    This is a serious liability to their health, but most high school players would not be selected by an NFL team as the development time is too lengthy.

    The NBA on the other hand flaunts this rule as a way to protect players when its really about monetizing college athletics and branding. This leads to one and dones, who likley could have made the jump to the NBA and have thus taken a scholarship away from someone who was there to play and earn a degree. I think players are crazy for not responding playing overseas instead of one year of college. At least get some money for that time as its unlikely you’ll finish that degree.

  36. That’s a terrible thing for the player but the solution is easy. Anybody going into their 3rd or 4th year who is clearly going to be an nfl draft pick should be covered with a multi million dollar insurance policy the schools have to provide.

    There should be other safeguards to such as the schools can’t take away their scholarships and they should be allowed to finish getting their degree if they are hurt so badly it destroys their chances for the pros.

    This sort of thing should also be a warning to college players that they might want to take getting a useful degree seriously in case they don’t make the nfl.

  37. Saying that a college running back is “good enough to be playing the in NFL now” isn’t really saying much. There’s only about two or three running backs in the pros that are elite anymore. Then there are a ton of pretty much disposable backs.

    But you’re right, the NFL should get rid of rule that says players have to wait 3 years from when they graduate from high school. And like every other high paying job in the country, they should replace it with a rule that states you must have a degree from college instead.

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