NFL statement on clock mistake in San Diego

[Editor’s note: The NFL released the following statement on Tuesday morning after a clock mistake on Monday Night Football.]

With 2:56 remaining in the fourth quarter, San Diego kicked off to Pittsburgh. The kick resulted in a touchback. By rule, the game clock does not start if the receiving team possesses the ball in the end zone and does not carry it into the field of play.

Because of an error by the clock operator, the game clock was incorrectly started before the Steelers’ first play from scrimmage following the touchback. That first down snap came with 2:38 left to play instead of 2:56, a difference of 18 seconds.

The official game time is kept on the stadium scoreboard, but it is the responsibility of the side judge to supervise the timing of the game. Had the side judge or any of the other six on-field officials noticed the timing error, they could have corrected it.

The game clock is not subject to instant replay review unless there is a timing issue on the last play of the first half or the last play of the game.

The performance of the clock operator and game officials will be reviewed per the standard procedure for reviewing every play of every game.

4 responses to “NFL statement on clock mistake in San Diego

  1. tough to decide which is more staggering – the NFL’s continued incompetence (seemingly always in nationally televised games) or the fact the Steelers coaching staff didn’t notice 18 seconds tick off with under 3 min left in a game they were trailing in

  2. “The game clock is not subject to instant replay review unless there is a timing issue on the last play of the first half or the last play of the game.”

    Why not? I mean, if EVER there is something that can be easily and 100% corrected by replay, it’s the clock!

    It boggles my mind that the mega billion dollar company that is the NFL doens’t pay to have full time staff at every important position.

  3. It’s time for the NFL to adopt Bill Belichick’s “challenge everything” suggestion.

    The Head Coaches should be responsible for policing the officiating, and they should have discretion for when it’s worth risking a Challenge and Time Out to review any situations.

  4. Let’s review every play and every second in slow motion! Come on, it’s just a game lighten up already.

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