Derrick Coleman’s lawyer: Concussion, deafness had role in crash

AP

The lawyer for Seahawks fullback Derrick Coleman thinks his client may have suffered a concussion during the car crash that landed him in jail, which coupled with his deafness might have led police to thinking he was intoxicated.

According to KING 5 in Seattle, Coleman’s attorney Stephen Hayne said walking away from the scene of the rollover crash which left the other driver with serious but not life-threatening injuries was not consistent with Coleman’s character.

“He was clearly not in his right mind after the accident, and that would probably be due to a concussion, but that’s speculation as well,” Hayne said. “We don’t know. But his walking away from the accident is absolutely out of character for who he is and how he would normally respond to a situation like that.”

Coleman was arrested for investigation of vehicular assault and hit and run, and the Seahawks have suspended him indefinitely while the investigation continues. His agent put out a statement yesterday saying Coleman may have fallen asleep at the wheel after leaving the Seahawks facility.

Witnesses saw Coleman either walking or running away from the scene, and police found him two blocks away from the crash. Bellevue Police Chief Steve Mylett said there was concern the batteries in Coleman’s hearing aid were low as he was being questioned, and Hayne said he brought a spare set of batteries to the police department.

A field sobriety test was performed and a search warrant was obtained for a blood test, but results were not available. Coleman told police he did not use any alcohol or drugs before driving.

Coleman is still being held without bail, and is awaiting a first appearance in court today.

30 responses to “Derrick Coleman’s lawyer: Concussion, deafness had role in crash

  1. There is NO WAY it could be an irresponsible professional athlete!

    Please don’t ask people to take personal responsibility for their actions. It’s unethical!!!

  2. The ol’ ‘Bring batteries to the police station so it looks like his hearing aid went out’ trick. Nice touch, Hayne.

  3. Sure, blame it on concussions. I’d like to blame my lack of job advancement on Obamas awful policies. Same thing.

  4. I doubt the police would have bothered to get a search warrant for a blood test, if there were no obvious signs of intoxication in the first place. Coleman’s lawyer has gone from saying his client fell asleep, to saying that he suffered a concussion. Not sure that someone who has just suffered a concussion will be physically able to walk away from the scene of an accident, let alone run. This story has guilty written all over it

  5. Intriguing.
    After reading the headline, I was thinking, “Oh, Good One, Mr. Attorney! Yeah, Right!”

    After reading the story, I found myself thinking that perhaps it is possible that he was concussed, couldn’t hear, and wigged out in confusion.

    Maybe I’m just getting old and gullible.

    I think it will boil down to the results of the drug and alcohol tests, and whether he was “Running” or “Walking” away from the scene. Huge difference there.

    I hope that the other driver recovers fully and quickly.

    I’m looking forward to finding out if I am becoming soft and gullible, or if maybe that is a prudent way to live.

  6. Just to be clear, all the experts who “know” he was drunk and drugged as he left the Hawks’ facility, will be back to admit they’re idiots once it’s shown he’s neither, right?

    Much like when you all “knew” Lynch stole a cell phone last year only to find out it was a case of mistaken identity.

    I’ll be waiting.

  7. lemmetalkwouldya says:
    Oct 16, 2015 7:35 AM

    I doubt the police would have bothered to get a search warrant for a blood test, if there were no obvious signs of intoxication in the first place. Coleman’s lawyer has gone from saying his client fell asleep, to saying that he suffered a concussion. Not sure that someone who has just suffered a concussion will be physically able to walk away from the scene of an accident, let alone run. This story has guilty written all over it

    ——————————————————-

    I’m of the opinion he was in-toxicated but to say he couldn’t walk/leave the scene after a concussion is not very accurate. Look at guys that suffer concussions and used to be able to return to the football field.

  8. lemmetalkwouldya says:
    Oct 16, 2015 7:35 AM

    Not sure that someone who has just suffered a concussion will be physically able to walk away from the scene of an accident, let alone run.

    ——————-

    Seriously? Watch football much?

  9. Ted Wells: “Mr. Coleman was generally aware of low batteries in his hearing aids.”

    In all seriousness though, I hope the injured party recovers quickly and fully. And I’d like to think Coleman wasn’t DWI – he seemed like a classy dude – would be a shame to find out otherwise.

  10. Wow…now the NFLPA is trying to use concussions to get out of hit and runs? We all know its not OK to walk away…sorry, as one witness puts it, RUN AWAY from the scene of an accident like this. People only due it because they are running from more trouble…suspended license, warrants, or most commonly, DUI’s!

    All I know is, Johnny Commoner wouldn’t be able to get out of these charges based on the, “I hit my head and it made me act feloniously.

  11. I wonder if the reason he’s being held is they haven’t decided what the charges will be, so they can’t bring him before a judge for arraignment/bail.

  12. I’ve the comments above, both those piling on and those that are waiting for more information. As at least one other commenter said, when I first read the headline about the lawyer’s comments, I said “yeah, right”.

    However as someone that wears hearing aids, I’ll add my 2 cents worth. I don’t know what Coleman’s specific hearing condition is, but I can relate mine. My hearing loss is mainly high frequency sounds. I don’t hear s, k, ch, and x sounds very well, especially when the person speaking to me has a higher pitched voice (usually women). Without my hearing aids, I still hear the rest of what people say, but the words sound like something else to me, and often a sentence either doesn’t make any sentence to me or I interpret it as something else.

    My hearing aids are programmed to amplify the frequencies I don’t hear well, and the microphones within them are directional….the microprocessors will detect the direction from which speech patterns are coming and filter out other sounds.

    These hearing aids are small, most people don’t know I wear them. But the batteries are small too. I get about 5 days from a set….and when they are nearing the 5th day the sound is not as good, and when I replace them (they beep then shut off when batteries need to be replaced) the difference is noticeable to me.

    So from my perspective, I can certainly see how communication could be affected. Of course I don’t understand why he would leave the scene. However I’m inclined wait to learn what the blood test results are though.

    I’d also like to suggest that anyone that might find themselves saying “what?” all the time to people that speak to them, get your hearing checked. Just because you can hear people doesn’t mean you’re hearing all of it. For me, it has been a life-changing experience.

  13. It doesn’t sound like he walked very far. The police found him 8 minutes after the crash, two blocks away and just standing there. Don’t know about you but I think even at my 60+ years, I could have gotten a lot farther than that in 8 minutes if I really wanted to get away. And the police said that when he saw them he walked over to the police car. He didn’t try to hide or run away from them. He says he wasn’t drinking or taking drugs so I’ll believe him until the tests show otherwise. He was on his way home from practice so when would he have had the opportunity to do any drinking or take drugs? I wonder if the police would have mistaken the way deaf person talks for being intoxicated.

  14. The only excuse his agent and lawyer apparently have yet to use is that the Coleman’s dog was driving, and then after the accident promptly ate his keys.

  15. The agent should just keep his mouth shut. People are probably willing to give the guy a break but with the agent saying stupid things and wanting to blame it on a concussion. Then talking about bringing spare batteries. All he’s done is make the guy look worse.

  16. whenwilliteverend says:
    Oct 16, 2015 12:55 PM

    The agent should just keep his mouth shut. People are probably willing to give the guy a break but with the agent saying stupid things and wanting to blame it on a concussion. Then talking about bringing spare batteries. All he’s done is make the guy look worse.

    ——-

    as I have mentioned above, my hearing aid batteries last around 5 days. So I change batteries at least 6 times per month. I try to remember to carry a spare pair with me, but sometimes I forget.

    When the batteries run low, my hearing aids beep for about a minute then shut off. It has happened while driving, in a restaurant, in a grocery store, while standing in line at a cashier, while sitting in the waiting room of a doctor’s office, at a concert, pumping gas, and even sitting on the throne. I never know where or when, and I replace them often enough that I don’t usually remember which day I did it last.

  17. ^^^^

    and let me add one more thing (and then I’ll be done). a typical hearing aid battery carrying case holds 2 batteries. If I use them while away from home, I put the used ones back in the case. If I forget I swapped them, I may still be carrying the used ones next time I need fresh ones.

    It’s not unheard of for someone that uses hearing aids to be without fresh batteries and in need of them. Of course, also I must say I don’t really know if he really needed them or not.

  18. Who in the world is “running” from the scene of an accident and is found 2 blocks from the scene of the accident? Have some sense people.

    So, there was no DISPATCH TIME delay, or Police RESPONSE TIME delays, there was only the accident, and police apprehension?

    Still the Police find Coleman “2 blocks away from the scene of the accident”, either “running” or “walking.”

    Does that sound like a hit and run intent running from the scene of an accident, much less a trained athlete! Same old PFT rush to judgment and total disregard of LOGIC

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