NFL has conference call to remind all teams of concussion protocol

AP

After last week’s mistakes in letting Rams quarterback Case Keenum continue to play after he suffered a concussion, the NFL is trying to make sure it doesn’t happen again.

The league just put out a statement, saying that a mandatory conference call was held last night with the head athletic trainers of all teams. The call also included NFLPA Medical Director Dr. Thom Mayer, and was led by NFL Chief Medical Advisor Dr. Betsy Nabel, Head, Neck & Spine Committee Co-Chairman Dr. Hunt Batjer, NFL Physicians Society President Dr. Robert Heyer of the Carolina Panthers, and PFATS President Rick Burkholder of the Chiefs.

“During the call, the team medical staffs discussed the events that led to the failure to remove St. Louis Rams quarterback Case Keenum from Sunday’s game, and reviewed the proper implementation of the league’s concussion protocols to ensure that players are removed from the field for a medical evaluation as required by the protocols,” the statement read. “Medical experts from the league and the Players Association will continue to review the protocols and make improvements as necessary to protect the health and safety of NFL players, including consideration of discipline for future violations of the protocols.”

The failure to protect Keenum was startling and sad, considering the amount of scrutiny the league has come under regarding concussions, and the steps they had previously taken to prevent such a situation.

16 responses to “NFL has conference call to remind all teams of concussion protocol

  1. The NFL will just keep reminding these teams of the rules they’re breaking until the Patriots do it then they’ll take draft picks and fine them millions. SMH #framegate

  2. Further, I would like to point out that Teddy Bridgewater, after being knocked out cold, was allowed to practice toward the end of the week and start the next Sunday’s game.

    How subjective is the evaluation protocol?

    Some concussion players sit two weeks. Seems like if your team needs a player to play, they find a way to fast-track the recovery period.

  3. Unless or until the NFL starts imposing significant penalties on teams, such as suspensions and/or loss of draft picks for failing to comply with this policy, too many teams, coaches, players, are going to justify finding ways to conveniently not lose a player, especially a key player, to this protocol.

    With no sticks, the carrots of a possible W are way too easy to be seen as the cost of doing business, when your business is winning football games.

    The NFL must either enforce the protocol strongly, or admit that “player safety” is all smoke and mirrors.

  4. The sincerity of player safety is a joke. All you have to do is see players that dress out of uniform are fined as much as those knocking players out.

  5. If the NFL were really concerned, they would implement a rule allowing coaches to call timeout to remove concussed players so that a timeout isn’t charged. But everyone would abuse it and so it won’t happen.

  6. I think some responsibility falls to the player too…he knows when he’s been rocked and he knows about all of the long term health concerns as well…not putting it all on him but he knows better too…

  7. “The NFL will just keep reminding these teams of the rules they’re breaking until the Patriots do it then they’ll take draft picks and fine them millions.”

    A simple declarative statement rooted in fact. Thank you, sir.

  8. The concussion movie is out next month.. YOU WOULD THINK that with that knowledge in mind the NFL would be more inclined to punish those now that so atrociously fail to follow protocols.

    Otherwise fans may be inclined to believe that nothing has changed from 10 years ago, which is what the concussion film follows.

    Maybe the NFL just thinks the public is too stupid to put 2 and 2 together

  9. “MongoRawBlow says:
    Nov 25, 2015 12:44 PM
    I think some responsibility falls to the player too…he knows when he’s been rocked and he knows about all of the long term health concerns as well”
    =========================================

    I’m going to take a wild guess and assume you’ve never had a concussion. Guys who have been knocked out aren’t thinking straight or rationally because their brains have suffered trauma. All they know is they’re playing a game they’ve been trained to play and fight with their teammates all their lives. It’s up to others to tell them to sit. Why do you think there’s a ref in boxing or MMA? To step in to say a fighter has had enough even though he may not know it to prevent further damage.

  10. granadafan says:
    Nov 25, 2015 1:20 PM
    “MongoRawBlow says:
    Nov 25, 2015 12:44 PM
    I think some responsibility falls to the player too…he knows when he’s been rocked and he knows about all of the long term health concerns as well”
    =========================================

    I’m going to take a wild guess and assume you’ve never had a concussion. Guys who have been knocked out aren’t thinking straight or rationally because their brains have suffered trauma. All they know is they’re playing a game they’ve been trained to play and fight with their teammates all their lives. It’s up to others to tell them to sit. Why do you think there’s a ref in boxing or MMA? To step in to say a fighter has had enough even though he may not know it to prevent further damage.

    And you’d be right. Concussees are the last to know how badly they’ve been hurt.

  11. Let me Guess, Coach Fisher missed the call while attending his seemingly permanent seat on the competition committee.

  12. flamethrower101 says:
    Nov 25, 2015 1:02 PM

    The concussion movie is out next month.. YOU WOULD THINK that with that knowledge in mind the NFL would be more inclined to punish those now that so atrociously fail to follow protocols.

    Otherwise fans may be inclined to believe that nothing has changed from 10 years ago, which is what the concussion film follows.

    Maybe the NFL just thinks the public is too stupid to put 2 and 2 together
    ———————————————————
    Well, when asked what proof they had that a certain player had done what the league accused, found guilty and punished the NFL replied “none”. That a large segment of the public still believes said player is guilty I’d say putting 2 and 2 together is asking a lot of them.

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