Dungy believes Manning won’t coach, or launch a midseason comeback

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With quarterback Peyton Manning officially becoming, for the first time in years, simply Peyton Manning, the question becomes which title will apply to him next?

He’s one of the very rare people who would be highly successful at anything he chooses to do, in football or anything else — including medicine, law, business, or politics. One of his head coaches believes Manning won’t choose two specific avenues within the NFL: coaching or a midseason comeback as a player.

“I really don’t think he’ll do that, that’s not his game,” Tony Dungy said on PFT Live regarding the possibility of a Roger Clemens-style return, after for example a quarterback for a contending team is lost for the year. “His game is preparation, getting to know my teammates. You know, if he was going to play this year he’d be at Duke with all his receivers and throwing and kind of just getting to know them. I just don’t think he’s going to approach it any other way so I think he’s made the decision that this is the time to step away.”

So what will he do, in Dungy’s opinion?

“He could go in a lot of different directions,” Dungy said. “I know it won’t be coaching because he’ll be too much of a perfectionist and expect too much from the guys so I don’t think it’s that direction. But whether it’s a General Manager as John Elway did running the team putting something together, people have mentioned possibly a college athletic director, something where you’re running the whole program. He’d be phenomenal on television, his recall and his understanding of the game. I just don’t know what challenges he’s looking for. I do know that his twins are very very important to him and have taken a great position in his life. So it’ll be something where he can be part of that family life and them growing up and also continue to do what he loves which is the game of football.”

A guy who knows a thing or two about TV agrees that Peyton Manning would be great on TV.

“The traits the great ones have are a love of the game, a visceral affection for the game, talking to football people in their language,” former NBC Sports chairman Dick Ebersol told Peter King of TheMMQB.com. “I am confident Peyton can do that — and he should definitely do games, not the studio. I will never forget early on with the Sunday night games, when John Madden brought his old coaching friend John Robinson on the road one week; he wanted Robinson to hear Manning in the production meeting. And Peyton, as always, was terrific, so insightful with such great stories. When he left the room, John Robinson said, ‘If that guy ever has a speaking engagement anywhere near me, and there’s an admission charge to hear him, I’ll pay whatever it costs just to listen to him talk football.”

We all may get to hear Manning talk football for free.  Or at least no cost beyond our current cable bill.

14 responses to “Dungy believes Manning won’t coach, or launch a midseason comeback

  1. “He’s one of the very rare people who would be highly successful at anything he chooses to do, in football or anything else — including medicine, law, business, or politics. ”

    Huh? What the heck is this based on? That is one of the most ridiculous things I have ever read.

    As far as all the talk about Peyton as ‘the greatest QB ever’, that is ridiculous as well. If given the choice of a couple of the QB’s in the HOF in their prime (i.e. Montana, Elway, Marino, Young, Favre) or Brady. I wouldn’t probably pick Peyton higher than 3rd.

  2. Not sure how u pick the “goat” but he’s in that discussion. If your only argument is rings?, then u need to rethink your argument. Charles Haley isn’t the greatest defender ever with his 5 sb and Robert horry isn’t better than mj with his 7 rings.

  3. I think he would make a great OC. He was basicly that with the Colts and Denver the first three years. I would love to see it.

  4. It isn’t all about rings for me but that is part of it. My ‘goat’ list starts with Montana, Brady (as much as it pains me to admit), Favre, and then Manning.

    As much as Manning was able to use his mind to pick apart defenses, Montana, Brady, and Favre just had a ridiculous instinct for the game. They were much more fun to watch in my opinion.

  5. aragorn1391 | Mar 7, 2016, 2:00 PM EST
    It isn’t all about rings for me but that is part of it. My ‘goat’ list starts with Montana, Brady (as much as it pains me to admit), Favre, and then Manning.

    As much as Manning was able to use his mind to pick apart defenses, Montana, Brady, and Favre just had a ridiculous instinct for the game. They were much more fun to watch in my opinion.

    Can’t argue much there. Watching manning march down the field was something to see in the early 2000’s. Farve was the most fun to watch. Wasn’t a fan of his but he always looked like he was having fun.

  6. It’s about rings to you, but then you list Favre above Manning? Maybe you should recheck your math, fella.

  7. He’s a good quarterback but his wonderlic intelligence score at the combine was pretty mediocre at best for football players. I wouldn’t want him for my doctor or lawyer.

    Eli, however was at the high end.

  8. “He’s one of the very rare people who would be highly successful at anything he chooses to do, in football or anything else — including medicine, law, business, or politics.”

    Peyton Manning, nuclear physicist.

    Um, no.

  9. I can definitely say I’d much rather see Manning call a game than Aikmen. It would be interesting to hear him evaluate game plans as they unfold and how he would adjust them to make them more successful.

    I can also definitely say that I wouldn’t want Manning as a personal physician.

  10. “He’s one of the very rare people who would be highly successful at anything he chooses to do, in football or anything else — including medicine, law, business, or politics. ”

    Because throwing a football and preforming surgery are such similar skill sets.

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