Amid ample opposition, NFL tables “yellow card” rule

AP

The NFL has applied a red light to its proposed “yellow card” rule.

Giants co-owner John Mara told reporters on Tuesday that the NFL has tabled the Competition Committee’s idea to automatically eject players who rack up a pair of unsportsmanlike conduct fouls in the same game. Mara said that extensive opposition emerged to the rule, prompting it to be set aside. He added that it could resurface at some point.

Even without a two-strikes situation, the NFL will be instructing officials to exercise more aggressively their discretion to eject players. However, officials continue to be reluctant to make heat-of-the-moment decisions that could impact the competitive balance.

The better approach could be to defer to the normal post-game disciplinary process, especially since fines and suspensions imposed after the fact are subject to an appeal process.

35 responses to “Amid ample opposition, NFL tables “yellow card” rule

  1. so,

    no yellow card red card
    +
    no encouragement to eject players for outrageous conduct
    +
    defer to the standard fine then appeal crazy circus after the game
    =
    more players than ever being mega jerks with on field violence knowing if they get a fine or suspension they can appeal then file a lawsuit and it likely won’t cost them much if anything… like always

    get ready… players are going to start tackling people by the facemask inside the 10 because they are frustrated they are getting beat because “I knew it would only cost us a couple of yards”

    just wait until someone gets a major concussion from a spearing or a broken neck from a facemask and it’s going to be the the NFL owners fault, like usual, for taking a decade to make a rule change

  2. Much ado about nothing. Like two guys would have been ejected all of last year and it wouldn’t have applied to any of the high profile cases that got everybody upset looking for solutions.

  3. If you wait until after a game to fine an out of control player like OBJ or Burfict, they’ve already done the damage and the fines are minor. A suspension does nothing to help the team affected by the perpetrator. Officials need to either keep control or the NFL needs to institute the 2 (or better 3) strike rule on egregious fouls.

  4. I remember when an excited Steve Tasker got tossed from the Super Bowl (his last game ever) when he inadvertently bumped a ref., who threw him out without thinking about it for a second.

  5. Post-game fines are worthless.

    Hit a player and a team where it hurts, when it will hurt. During the game.

    If the refs start throwing some of these bozos out of games, they might straighten up their act.

  6. It would be doubly awesome if the NFL not only used yellow cards, but lured Pierluigi Collina out of Italy to referee them as well.

    If you have no idea what I am talking about, google his blessed dome.

  7. The soccerification of the NFL started when Ravens fans stole European soccer chants and pretended they invented them. That they now get to chant them to a 5-11 team that can’t use its hands or tackle is lost on them.

  8. Officials just need to eject a couple players the next couple times this stuff happens, preferably with an automatic financial penalty. The message will be sent.

    There are a lot of areas where the authority of the officials is being undermined through technology. This is an area where they can choose to take greater authority over the tone of a game.

    That’s the best part of the yellow/red card system – when handled well, it keeps the game in check. Officials do some of that with flags, now they need the backing of the league to follow through on ejections.

  9. If officials are truly afraid to make heat-of-the-moment decisions, then make the number of unsportsmanlike conduct penalties cumulative over the season. If a player collects X number, then he is automatically suspended for the next game. If he collects X+2, suspend him for the rest of the season.

    No heat of the moment decisions, a commitment to safety, and a player knows exactly where he stands when a game starts.

  10. i come to disagree with most of you.. while not all personal fouls are created equal, when a player shows no respect for a rule and goes out of his way to lay a illegal hit on another player he should be out of the game.. panthers vs giants last year had two player that should have been ejected and to be honest a certain receiver should’ve been banned for the year, instead we rather worry about what player is smoking pot, you can complain about stricter rules but when your multi million dollar employee is garenteed pay for injury youd make it your priority to protect your investment to

  11. Agree with this. Not all unsportsmanlike penalties are the same. The officials should definitely be more willing to toss players who are out of control regardless of the number of penalties. Burfect, OBJ & Talib all should have been ejected and it’s ridiculous that it didn’t happen.

  12. There’s no need for a 2 strikes and your out rule if the officials would have the courage to eject a player for obvious misconduct during a game. Officials can’t worry about how the ejection of a player might affect the outcome of a game as every decision/non-decision, penalty/non-penalty they make in the course of a game has the potential to affect the outcome of a game.

  13. This proposed rule is as stupid as all those moronic gun control laws that the vacuous liberal politicians keep trying to shove down people’s throats. Your unwillingness or incompetent inability to enforce the laws you have is no reason for the creation of even more laws.

  14. Ejections should occur at the time of the infraction. If it occurs in the second half, the player should also be out for the first half of the next game where the team is not playing a divisional opponent of the team against which the infraction occurred.

  15. Weird. Usually in these meetings their chair pusher just lifts up the old farts hand and presses “yea” without any regard for the game.

  16. I would rather see them try the extra point as a corner kick. The kicker launches it in and the offensive players try to jump up and knock the ball through the goalposts with their helmets.

  17. “The better approach could be to defer to the normal post-game disciplinary process, especially since fines and suspensions imposed after the fact are subject to an appeal process.”

    I really, really disagree with this. If a player is acting bad enough for a suspension in a game, the current opponent should get the “advantage” of him having to sit a game, not a future opponent.

    If a Raider viciously attacks a Ram, potentially knocking the Ram out of the game, the Raider should be ejected then and there. The Rams are already at a competitive disadvantage with an injured player, the Rams should get the benefit of the Raider missing the rest of the game, not the next opponent on the Raiders’ docket.

  18. Just eject players when they do something above and beyond. If you don’t know what above and beyond is, you shouldn’t be an NFL official. OBJ vs Norman = above and beyond, the spear, not the punches. Everyone punches. Talib vs the Carolina WR = above and beyond. It’s nowhere near as complex as the catch rule (which really shouldn’t be that complex anyways).

  19. “Much ado about nothing. Like two guys would have been ejected all of last year and it wouldn’t have applied to any of the high profile cases that got everybody upset looking for solutions.”

    In the immortal words of Ty Webb:

    You’re not right.

  20. mmack66 says:
    Mar 22, 2016 4:50 PM
    Post-game fines are worthless.

    Hit a player and a team where it hurts, when it will hurt. During the game.

    If the refs start throwing some of these bozos out of games, they might straighten up their act.
    ————————
    Not only do they need to do that, the ejection rule needs to be changed so that when a team gets a player ejected—they have to play a man short. Otherwise, it’s not a great deal of a punishment.

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