Bad knee could cause Myles Jack to drop out of the Top 10

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Based on talent alone, UCLA linebacker Myles Jack may be the best player in this year’s draft. Not only was Jack one of the best linebackers in college football, but he’s such a great all-around football player that when the Bruins needed him to he played very well at running back.

But Jack’s knee injury may keep him out of the Top 10 in the draft.

Albert Breer reports that Jack has a type of cartilage injury in his knee known as a chondral defect, and there’s debate among doctors who have examined him just how serious that will be. It’s possible that some team with a high pick will give Jack a clean bill of health, but Breer reports that teams outside the Top 10 are doing additional research on Jack with the idea that he could fall to them.

Jack’s agent has disputed reports that Jack’s bad knee could shorten his career, but Jack’s knee has been a common topic of conversation throughout the draft process.

The reality of the draft process is that the people putting out negative information on Jack’s knee may actually be from teams that like Jack and hope he drops to them in the draft. We’ll find out on Thursday if it goes down that way, or if Jack remains one of the top players in this draft, as his play at UCLA suggests he should.

31 responses to “Bad knee could cause Myles Jack to drop out of the Top 10

  1. “The reality of the draft process is that the people putting out negative information on Jack’s knee may actually be from teams that like Jack and hope he drops to them in the draft.”

    So dogging him out of money and draft position equates to liking him. Yikes I’d hate to know what they’d do if they didnt like him… I guess not draft him lol.

  2. He had a torn meniscus that was able to be repaired. When it’s repaired the rehab time is slower because you have to be non weight bearing for the first 4-6 weeks depending on the surgeons rehab protocol. Your muscles atrophy because of this, but he should be fine by now. Worst case scenario if it re-tears it, he has it scoped and is back in 4-6 weeks.

    Gurleys injury was much worse and he is doing great. I’d take him at 3-5.

  3. Did computerized mock draft the other day and he fell to the Seahawks (I picked him) and Elliot was still available too……..man, looking forward to the draft to see what happens.

  4. Thank you for not going on a rant about college players not getting paid cash. I do not believe Jack received his college degree. If he doesn’t have an agreement with the school to let him continue tuition free then he made a mistake by dropping out.

  5. I want him in Jacksonville so bad but Dave Caldwell never shows his card. I hope this time he truley likes him.
    My gut feeling is Jags are going to surprise people and pick DeForest Buckner at 5.

  6. I doubt this guy is worried about paying for his education from UCLA. In 4 days he’ll be slotted into a contract that will pay him more than most people make in their life. He’ll be able to buy as many degrees as he wants.

  7. Ozzie can’t afford another bad knee costing a first round pick his entire first season. I can’t see how the Ravens can draft him with #6. I hope Tunsil is still there. I know Ramsey is a vain hope.

  8. sdchicken says:
    Apr 24, 2016 6:01 PM
    He had a torn meniscus that was able to be repaired. When it’s repaired the rehab time is slower because you have to be non weight bearing for the first 4-6 weeks depending on the surgeons rehab protocol. Your muscles atrophy because of this, but he should be fine by now. Worst case scenario if it re-tears it, he has it scoped and is back in 4-6 weeks.

    Gurleys injury was much worse and he is doing great. I’d take him at 3-5 ___________________________________________________

    You just are wrong on this. A chondral defect means there is a voided area of cartilage as well as damage to the femourbone itself. I have a chondral defect and I have had both a microfracture surgery as well as an OATs procedure (osteochondral autograft transfer system) performed by surgeons who are employed by Chicago and St. Louis professional sports teams and received world class care and rehabilitation. In both cases I was non-weight bearing for a minimum of 6 – 8 weeks. The cartilage is never coming back – these are stop gap measures to an inevitable knee replacement surgery if you are an active adult. This type of an injury is devastating to a young athlete and he may be able to be effective in the short term, but his career projection is extremely limited in the long term as this is a degenerative condition.

  9. Apr 24, 2016 7:38 PM
    sdchicken says:
    Apr 24, 2016 6:01 PM
    He had a torn meniscus that was able to be repaired. When it’s repaired the rehab time is slower because you have to be non weight bearing for the first 4-6 weeks depending on the surgeons rehab protocol. Your muscles atrophy because of this, but he should be fine by now. Worst case scenario if it re-tears it, he has it scoped and is back in 4-6 weeks.

    Gurleys injury was much worse and he is doing great. I’d take him at 3-5 _____________________________________

    Additionally, Gurley’s injury was torn ligaments – much easier to repair and maintain comparatively.

  10. If he falls, he’s not getting past the Raiders. Myles Jack had a private workout with the Raiders and he would fill a need. Raiders had problems covering TEs last year.

  11. If my own experience is an indication, I think he’ll be fine. I have a six inch scar in my left knee from which a cartilage was removed in 1967. I’ve been bone on bone for 49 years without much more than occasional throbbing, but even that didn’t warrant an Aleve.

  12. denverdave3 says:
    Apr 24, 2016 8:08 PM
    If my own experience is an indication, I think he’ll be fine. I have a six inch scar in my left knee from which a cartilage was removed in 1967. I’ve been bone on bone for 49 years without much more than occasional throbbing, but even that didn’t warrant an Aleve. ______________________________________

    But you aren’t playing professional football

  13. As a Dolphins fan…I would love this.

    But I think this is just teams spreading misinformation in hopes a player they like drops to them.

  14. Lasher1650
    You just are wrong on this. A chondral defect means there is a voided area of cartilage as well as damage to the femourbone itself. I have a chondral defect and I have had both a microfracture surgery as well as an OATs procedure (osteochondral autograft transfer system) performed by surgeons who are employed by Chicago and St. Louis professional sports teams and received world class care and rehabilitation. In both cases I was non-weight bearing for a minimum of 6 – 8 weeks. The cartilage is never coming back – these are stop gap measures to an inevitable knee replacement surgery if you are an active adult. This type of an injury is devastating to a young athlete and he may be able to be effective in the short term, but his career projection is extremely limited in the long term as this is a degenerative condition.

    Lasher1650
    I’m sorry to hear you had to go through those procedures and I understand your concern based on your experience. The bottom line is, his official MRI, XRAYs, and medical recheck reports have not been released to the public. We don’t know the severity of his possible osteochondral defect, if he really has one. There are different degrees of severity based on size, depth, and location of osteochondral defects. I have been rehabbing athletes for 15 years and have a lot of experience with these specific injuries. Outcomes are not all dire. I think the fact that he is ripping off 40 inch vertical jumps and outstanding standing broad jump, and great agility specific position drills with documented no pain or swelling is a good sign. Let’s not nail the coffin in his career when you don’t have any factual information about his specific medical information.

  15. sdchicken says:
    Apr 24, 2016 8:32 PM
    I’m sorry to hear you had to go through those procedures and I understand your concern based on your experience. The bottom line is, his official MRI, XRAYs, and medical recheck reports have not been released to the public. We don’t know the severity of his possible osteochondral defect, if he really has one. There are different degrees of severity based on size, depth, and location of osteochondral defects. I have been rehabbing athletes for 15 years and have a lot of experience with these specific injuries. Outcomes are not all dire. I think the fact that he is ripping off 40 inch vertical jumps and outstanding standing broad jump, and great agility specific position drills with documented no pain or swelling is a good sign. Let’s not nail the coffin in his career when you don’t have any factual information about his specific medical information.
    ________________________________________________________________________________________________

    If you truly do rehab for a living (which I doubt) you would never mention an X-ray as a diagnostic tool for a soft tissue injury as cartilage/ligaments do not show up on an X-ray. Additionally, MRI’s are directional in terms of overall diagnosis at best, as any knee specialist will tell you there is no definitive diagnosis until they can actually see the extent of damage via arthroscopy. I did say that it is not unexpected that he can perform well in the short term, but his long-term prognosis is drastic/dire with a femoral defect. If you don’t trust me – contact Dr. Brian Cole or Dr. Matthew Matava directly and I am confident they will confirm my perspective on this.

  16. With 2 good knees this guy is a stud. With only one good knee not so much. He’s got nothing to lose going all out to play and I wish him much success.

  17. Fall out of the top 10? More like top 100. The guy is going to be a 3rd/4th round pick. His injury is no joke. Reference Ifo last year/ Lattimore etc… sometimes they just cant come back.

  18. If by chance he goes out of the Top 10, he will definately be gone by 14. No way he gets by the Bucs, Bears, Dolphins or Raiders. Remember this time last year and the pundits said Jay Ajayi “had bone on bone” knee issues and he is doing fine. He dropped a few rounds because of this.

  19. Lasher1650,

    XRAYs confirm fractures and if an osteochondral defect is severe enough in depth can show in XRAYs. An MRI would then possibly confirm this injury from the cartilage standpoint, but not to its full extent. I didn’t say XRAYs would be the sole imaging done. Any knee injury starts with XRAYs, then a MRI. They wouldn’t do a scope unless the other imaging was suggestive of something, or if pain and edema don’t go away. You and I both don’t know the extent of his injury so that was my point. You can attack me all you like. Hope your knee is doing better and enjoy the rest of your weekend.

  20. Got slammed on my last comment in regard to Jack. His condition is
    similar to Clowney’s. Teams worry about degenerative conditions
    involving damage to the meniscus. The procedure to cure is micro-
    fracture surgery which involves drilling holes in the bones to
    help blood flow to the area. The meniscus area has little blood flow to
    help heal or regenerate. We read recently that the Patriots latest
    roster cut was in Germany where they have some experimental
    procedures to help the meniscus regenerate. Micro fracture surgery is relatively new and does not have the best track record.
    I have only seen Jack play a few times and he was fun to watch. I hope he gets a chance. This is why the NCAA should pay players or in
    the very least pay for insurance coverage to allow kids like Jack and
    Smith from ND to get some sort of payment for the damage to their
    bodies and careers while the NCAA makes billions. …That’s billions
    not millions!!!

  21. Nope! He’ll probably go #7 to SF and become another of their “injured projects” who definitely won’t play this year and may or may not play in 2017 or after.

    “If you’re the San Francisco 49ers, it’s what you do, but if you want the best insurance…”

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