Third-round negotiations become the NFL’s “wild, wild West”

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There’s a popular belief that rookie contracts under the 2011 CBA should take only five minutes. In one specific round, those talks are slightly more complicated.

As explained by Ryan O’Halloran of the Florida Times-Union, the third round has become what one agent calls the “wild, wild West.”

For reasons not entirely known, the current labor deal allows for more negotiation in round three than in the other rounds. Over time, this has created fluctuations in the various slots, giving both team and player ammunition for digging in and not budging.

As noted by Ben Volin of the Boston Globe,  206 of 253 draft picks have signed contracts as of Friday afternoon. The 81.4-percent completion rate is kept low by the fact that only 17 of 35 third-round picks have agreed to terms.

It’s odd that the current cookie-cutter approach doesn’t apply to every round of the draft, and it’s an inconsistency that should be addressed in the next labor negotiations. Of course, given all of the other issues pending between the NFL and NFL Players Association, this one likely will be very low on the list.

7 responses to “Third-round negotiations become the NFL’s “wild, wild West”

  1. “Of course, given all of the other issues pending between the NFL and NFL Players Association, this one likely will be very low on the list.”

    Truer words may never have been spoken. The coming labor negotiations may well make ’82 look like a playground spat and ’11 like a campfire sing a long.

  2. If I were the NFLPA I would tell every player to save his money for the next 3-5 years so that they can go into a deep strike to break the greedy, rich owners.

  3. They’d have had a better chance before the current CBA. The problem is players have very short careers. If your career is only 3-5 years no way you strike. Contrast that to baseball, where players have long careers and are willing to miss one.

    >>sportzfan says:
    May 30, 2016 2:51 PM
    If I were the NFLPA I would tell every player to save his money for the next 3-5 years so that they can go into a deep strike to break the greedy, rich owners.

  4. Labor strife will not come.
    The union may stay away for a couple of weeks but by the time the season starts the current union leadership will cave in and take the previous offer.

    Don’t overestimate this current union leadership that hasn’t won anything in years and only steps up to the microphone after a decision has already been made by the owners or the courts.

  5. The median salary in the NFL in 2015 was $860,000. That is across all players or in other words, the people who make up the NFLPA. Yes, they are certainly going to be able to go on strike and hold out against the owners. Here is the worth of the Top 17 owners, which represents a majority in any votes on the contract.

    Paul Allen: $15 billion net worth
    Stan Kroenke: $5 billion
    Malcolm Glazer: $4.4 billion
    Stephen Ross: $4.4 billion
    Shahid Khan: $2.9 billion
    Jerry Jones: $2.7 billion
    Robert Kraft: $2.3 billion
    Robert Mc Nair: $1.8 billion
    Stephen Bisciotti: $1.8 billion
    Arthur Blank: $1.6 billion
    James Irsay: $1.5 billion
    William Ford: $1.25 billion
    Kenneth Adams: $1.2 billion
    Tom Benson: $1.2 billion
    Denise York: $1.1 billion
    Dan Snyder: $1 billion
    Alex Spanos: $1 billion

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