Stephen A. Smith swings at De Smith, misses

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The chronically bombastic (and often, when it relates to the NFL, misinformed) Stephen A. Smith is always good for a hot take delivered in flaming fashion. On Wednesday, Stephen A. Smith fired shots in machine-gun fashion at NFLPA executive director DeMaurice Smith regarding the lingering phenomenon known as #Deflategate.

Along the way, Stephen A. gets himself worked up into a cartoonish frenzy.

“It’s not just his job to be in court all the damn time,” Stephen A. said on First Take. “It’s his job to ingratiate himself with the Commissioner and the National Football League in a fashion that speaks to a relationship that’s taking place so the coffers, the financial coffers, of the players is not being compromised.”

Stephen A. is right on the first part; it’s not DeMaurice Smith’s job to be in court “all the damn time.” But it is his job to be in court whenever necessary to advance the interests of the players. And that’s what DeMaurice Smith has done, successfully for the most part.

In Brady’s case, it was the NFL not the NFLPA that ran to court. And it was the NFL not the NFLPA that prolonged the case after the ruling from the judge who presided over the lawsuit the NFL filed.

As to the second part of that initial comment, Stephen A. couldn’t be more wrong. Since Roger Goodell became the Commissioner, the NFL in many of its relationships has ditched symbiosis for suffocation, constantly pushing for more and more and more and forcing supposed partners to scramble for battle stations. The NFL, miffed at a CBA negotiated by Paul Tabliabue that was deemed to be too favorable to the players, was determined to swing the pendulum sharply in the other direction in 2011. In that respect and all others, the NFL has tried to have its way in nearly every way possible with the union.

But not in all ways. DeMaurice Smith inherited an internal system of justice that was stacked against the players. He has since managed to shift appeals under the PED policy and the substance-abuse policy to neutral arbitration. As to the remaining areas that fall exclusively under Goodell’s authority (i.e., Personal Conduct Policy violations and discipline for conduct detrimental to the game), the NFLPA’s only tool for ensuring fair processes and outcomes is litigation.

For the most part, it has worked. But, obviously, it’s not cheap.

“Tom Brady and Deflategate, from my understanding, has cost the Players Association millions,” Stephen A. declared. “I have a problem with that. I have a problem with the issue of deflated footballs regressing to a point where it’s taking millions of dollars out of the coffers of players. That’s my issue.”

If that’s his issue, Stephen A. should take it up with the league office. They’re the ones who pulled the pin on the still-exploding grenade by ignoring science, presuming guilt, and engineering the evidence in a way to confirm a predetermined outcome.

So what should DeMaurice Smith have done, Stephen A.?

“I think that it’s something that DeMaurice Smith could have worked to alleviate in a better fashion — not saying completely or whatever,” Stephen A. said, temporarily replacing yelling with rambling. “But I think he could have worked out better if he had done a portion — I’m not saying he doesn’t do his job, because he’s obviously exceptional in some areas — but as it pertains to cultivating the kind of relationship where you’re not costing the players you represent so much money, I think he could do a better job with that. That is my lone issue with DeMaurice Smith. That he, to me, turns everything into a legal issue because that is where he is comfortable, that is where his bread is buttered. But unfortunately it is at the expense of a bevy of players whose names are not Tom Brady.”

Frankly, there’s nothing DeMaurice Smith could have done other than fight, because the NFL isn’t going to compromise on this or any issue of discipline that falls ultimately within Goodell’s purview. There’s no sweet-talking to be done; the NFL takes the Veruca Salt approach to most negotiations. The options are to give the league what the league wants, or find an external authority to tell the league it can’t have it.

Stephen A. is either unwilling or unable to see that.

“My God, it’s over!” Stephen A. screamed. “Sixteen months! You’re costing the players — I am up here on national TV going off about this not because of the competence of DeMaurice Smith, which is not to be questioned. Not because of his intent, I understand that the man is an honorable man. I am not trying to disrespect him. I am saying you are compromising in my opinion the interests of the players by going all out with Tom Brady on this when Tom Brady already has his lawyers and Tom Brady already has his money and there’s a whole bunch of dudes that can’t afford the kind of defense that Tom Brady can afford. That’s my problem.”

Here’s my problem with that argument. First, the money that pays for lawyers isn’t coming out of the pockets of the players. It’s coming from the pool of money created by the dues paid by members of the union and other methods of generating revenue. Second, the money spent helping Tom Brady helps all other players by, if successful, limiting Goodell’s power and, in turn, making it easier to eventually persuade Goodell to delegate his remaining final-say authority to neutral arbitration.

Third, and perhaps most importantly, Brady went with his own counsel during the investigation — and promptly screwed up the case by refusing to make his cell phone or its contents available to Ted Wells. The NFLPA, given its history of tussling with the league when required, knows not only how to duke it out but also how to engineer a case to make it easier to win, or as the case may be harder to lose.

Brady, for example, would have gotten much more stern and candid (and authoritative) advice from Jeffrey Kessler than Brady got from Don Yee, who has a long history of letting Brady do whatever he wants to do. Without that advice, the NFL wouldn’t have been able to trump up the case after the fact with the notion that Brady “destroyed” his cell phone — a dynamic that was first leaked by someone in the league office to Stephen A. Smith.

NFLPA spokesman George Atallah apparently believes that the leak came from NFL executive V.P. of football operations Troy Vincent.

“Sorry [De] missed the segment,” Atallah said to Stephen A. Smith on Twiter, “he was in court. Say hello to your boy Troy Vincent though. Hope to see you in Bristol soon.”

Coincidentally (or not), Vincent previously has criticized the union with similar language: “Look at the amount of money being spent on legal fees for a handful of people. It’s millions and millions of dollars, and we’ve got players that are hurting. We’ve got young men who don’t know how to identify a good financial advisor. Men are in transition who aren’t doing well, and yet $8-10 million a year is spent in court fees about who should make a decision on someone, who in some cases has committed a crime.”

Here’s the reality. With a truly fair and neutral system of arbitration, both sides would be spending far less money on lawyers because the losing party would believe in every case that justice was done. In too many of the cases handled by Goodell, the NFLPA believes that justice hasn’t been done, which forces the NFLPA to seek justice elsewhere.

Justice may be blind but, again, it’s not cheap. In pro football’s ongoing battle of labor relations, a cost of doing business for both sides. Still, the league is once again trying to use the expenses as a wedge among the players, with Stephen A. Smith currently becoming the conduit for making in June of 2016 the same argument that Vincent made in June of 2015.

61 responses to “Stephen A. Smith swings at De Smith, misses

  1. File this headline under “shocking.” Do he and Skip Clueless still battle on Worst Take?

  2. I’ll summarize the 25 paragraphs: Stephen A. Smith is still the blowhard moron you knew him as.

  3. “In Brady’s case, it was the NFL not the NFLPA that ran to court. ”

    False. Brady appealed the arbitration decision to the District Court, not the other way around.

  4. Stephen A. Smith’s vocabulary:
    Anticopious
    Indubiousness
    Blasphemy
    Cordiality
    Asinine
    Epistemology
    Quaduilaterally
    Atrocious
    Exasperate
    Agilationize
    Unfathomable
    Beautificality
    Audacity
    Quite Frankly
    Absurd
    ———–
    Bottom line: Dude’s an idiot.

  5. Shocking! Just shocking! Once again Stephen A. is clueless and is assigning blame in all the wrong places. What a surprise! When you work for BSPN, it becomes 2nd nature.

  6. In Brady’s case, it was the NFL not the NFLPA that ran to court.

    This is very disingenuous. They BOTH ran to court – the NFL just got to NY before the NFLPA got to Minnesota.

  7. BSPN resident troll just sticking up for the Commissioner. They made their bed and now they are sleeping in it. I don’t know anybody that watches these guys anymore.

  8. stealthjunk says:
    Jun 2, 2016 12:06 PM
    “In Brady’s case, it was the NFL not the NFLPA that ran to court. ”

    False. Brady appealed the arbitration decision to the District Court, not the other way around.
    ———-
    Wrong. The NFL took the arbitration decision to court in NY to have that decision affirmed. Brady filed later in Minnesota, but the NFL was first, which is why the case was heard in NY.

  9. Next CBA negotiations are going to be out of control. And once again, most commenters on this site will side with the owners. Blows my mind.

  10. Who would you believe..Stephen A…Goodell…Vincent..Kensil…Wells..et al..or 21 scientists and the arbiter of the 9/11 fund Ken Feinberg?

  11. Mr. A. Smith likes the big words, I think sometimes though he’s not really sure what they mean. I mean, that’s the only rational I have for him because nobody could really be that logically challenged and mentally defective and work for a major broadcaster – could they?

  12. You know, when I go the kitchen and half of the cookies have been eaten, then I see my 3 year old running around with crumbs and chocolate chips all over him, I know he did it, I don’t need proof. When I confront him and he continues to cry and whine about how he didn’t do it, after about 5 minutes of hearing the crying I just let it go to save my sanity.

    That’s about where I am with this, I’m tired of hearing the fans and media members cry and whine about something that you only need common sense to figure out. Brady cheated, he got caught and tried to cover it up by destroying possible evidence, dodging blame by blaming the ball boys and so on… But I need to save my sanity. Just let the crybaby play so I don’t have to hear it anymore.

    Doesn’t matter what the outcome if, the patriots will forever be known in football history as cheaters and whenever people bring up the best teams of all time, there will always be a “but” when the Pat’s get brought up.

  13. stealthjunk says:
    Jun 2, 2016 12:06 PM

    “In Brady’s case, it was the NFL not the NFLPA that ran to court. ”

    False. Brady appealed the arbitration decision to the District Court, not the other way around.
    _______________
    Here we have yet another bandwagon fan trying to spread lies and misinformation!

    The NFL filed papers in Manhattan on July 28th, in federal court to confirm Goodell’s suspension. Fraudger knew his decision was, well, fraudulent and full of lies.

    Brady and the NFLPA filed on July 29th. People are so full of jealousy that they just make stuff up knowing that other uninformed haters will just suck it right up!

  14. I don’t know who is worse Stephen A or Skip, has to be the worst show on BSPN. Two egotistical blow hards going at each other for the entire show…horrible.

  15. The sad times we live in for sports coverage. The louder and bigger moron you are, the more attention you get.

  16. To side with the NFL, at this juncture with all the facts that are present, is to agree with Stephen A. Smith.

    That is a fact. You folks go right ahead and let that sink in.

  17. Stephen A. Smith is an idiot and has been since long before deflategate

    haters are just tired of seeing the pats constant success……must suck to be a fan of any other team in the afc east

  18. When Stephen A talks, he is like the modern day version of Don King. Using all of these words that just make him sound ridiculous. You can get the point across without trying to prove you own 31 different thesauruses… Thesauri? Whatever, you get the idea.

    Speaking of a guy knowing where his “bread is buttered”, this rant is so transparent its “absurdaciousness”. LOL. Stephen A is simply giving the league a mouth hug for the “destroyed his cell phone” scoop.

  19. Stephen mentioned that “Brady already has his money”. I knew right then that Stephen A has fallen into the same trap Hardy did. They are both ‘jealous’ of Tom Brady because he is very successful, very rich and has a gorgeous wife and cute children to boot! I haven’t watched ESPN since NFL Network came out. And never will. They employ a lot of ‘numbskulls’. Great article Mike F. You da man!

  20. I like Stephen A.’s takes on basketball. In that forum he seems to know what he is talking about. He is pretty misguided when he babbles about other sports though. The fact is that when the last CBA was negotiated there was discussion of the commissioners role in discipline but that was pushed aside in favor of raising the salary cap and creating conditions that were monetarily valuable to the players and the NFLPA. By the time deflategate is said and done it will probably have cost the player’s union 15 million. That is far less than the gains the player’s made by conceding authority to Goodell. In that context, this lawsuit is not hurting the players. Its the price they paid for their raise and if it allows the NFLPA to codify some limits and conditions on the commissioners authority then the NFLPA gets to have its cake and eat it too. Looks to me that Stephen A.’s outrage is just a product if his poor performance in math.

  21. This article offers some interesting insight into Stephen A** Smith. I’ve never been a fan of the screaming and yelling over people, but its easier to understand now that I know his perspective.

    Smith thinks its a persons job to “ingratiate” himself, not to his boss or colleagues but instead to his opposition in negotiation. Players are not in business with the NFL, and D Smith’s job is not to be friendly with or subservient to Goodell, his job is to work for the best interest of the players.

    Stephen A thinks his job is to bow down to Goodell. Perhaps that’s what Smith does at contract time with ESPN, subjugate himself to their wishes. No wonder he’s always angry and yelling. No wonder he acts like a tough guy on TV, behind closed doors he bows down willingly to the power that be. Docile Stephen, willingly compliant to his masters

  22. Wait, you mean this site throws it’s unabashed support to the poor, underdog NFLPA? That’s a real shocker.

  23. if the Deflategate “victim” was Cam Newton instead of Tom Brady, you better believe S.A.Smith would be singing a different song…

  24. sledge2000 says:
    Jun 2, 2016 12:18 PM
    stealthjunk says:
    Jun 2, 2016 12:06 PM
    “In Brady’s case, it was the NFL not the NFLPA that ran to court. ”

    False. Brady appealed the arbitration decision to the District Court, not the other way around.
    ———-
    Wrong. The NFL took the arbitration decision to court in NY to have that decision affirmed. Brady filed later in Minnesota, but the NFL was first, which is why the case was heard in NY.
    _____

    NFL knew Brady would appeal the decision in court and felt they would get a favorable ruling in NY because the judge in Minnesota has a history of going against NFL. So really the NFL filing 1st was just to beat Brady to the punch!

    As for Stephn A Smith…..dude is a complete idiot that ESPN keeps around for one reason! He makes loud and often stupid comments that draw attention for the network

  25. Steve Smith is once again being used by the NFL offices and he is:

    A. too dumb to realize it; or

    B. just happy he has something controversial to say on TV and get press

    here is a new word for you Stevie, disingenuous-putz

    For him to not realize this is all about the labor issue with the league looking to get complete control over all the players, not just Brady shows how dumb this guy is.

    Has to be a Dolphin fan…

  26. stealthjunk says:
    Jun 2, 2016 12:06 PM

    “In Brady’s case, it was the NFL not the NFLPA that ran to court. ”

    False. Brady appealed the arbitration decision to the District Court, not the other way around.
    ———————-

    Misleading. While the NFLPA did appeal the decision, the NFL initially went to the Southern District of NY to affirm Goodell’s arbitration ruling. As they filed first, their filing took precedence. That is what Judge Berman acted on.

    When the NFL lost this, they appealed to the 2nd Circuit Court which held a hearing with a judicial panel.

    The NFLPA appealed this decision requesting an en banc hearing from the 2nd Circuit.

  27. Stephen mentioned that “Brady already has his money”
    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    The point of unions is to ensure equal rights and protections; the amount of money earned has nothing to do with it. Sliding pay scales based upon skill are common in union jobs.

    What is uncommon is that Brady takes far less salary than most QBs to free up money so the team can pay his fellow players and have a more talented roster. That is team, team-mate, and union friendly.

  28. Florio’s instinct to side with labor on every dispute has led him astray in this case. And now it’s not only costing the Pats, but also the rest of the NFL players. To the tune of the $32 million the NFLPA has spent on Brady’s quixotic defense.

  29. dickebyrd says:
    Jun 2, 2016 12:34 PM
    Unions suck
    ______________
    They sure do!

    I hate only having to work 5 days a week. And those vacation days are so annoying. Don’t even get me started on those ridiculous 8 hour workdays. I mean really, who needs health insurance and pension plans?

    Things were so much better before those stupid unions started fighting for workers’ rights!

  30. De Smith did do a lousy job of getting the players to agree with the CBA that gave the commish so much power in determining player discipline. The players should have pushed for independent arbitrators or a panel that would make these decisions.

  31. Smith lacks the necessary leadership capabilities required for the job. He meets the paper qualifications but doesn’t have the intangibles to be an effective leader for the NFLPA. Managing the big picture and maintaining relationships with management are some of the qualities Smith doesn’t have. Smith is bad for the game of football which is also bad for the NFLPA, but and Smith seems incapable of understanding this fact, defending AP, Hardy, and Rice ate prime examples. In addition, Smith can’t grasp the concept that he has to live by the labor contract he negotiated, instead he takes everything to court.

  32. “If you tell a lie big enough and keep repeating it, people will eventually come to believe it. The lie can be maintained only for such time as the NFL can shield the fans from the scientific or economic consequences of the lie”.—–Roger Godell

  33. DeSmith is s horrible leader of men, but let’s be honest, 3/4 of the men he represents are broke within 5 years of their last NFL paycheck. You can’t fix stoopid

  34. tebowislife says:
    Jun 2, 2016 12:54 PM
    To the tune of the $32 million the NFLPA has spent on Brady’s quixotic defense.
    ————————

    $32M??? Source of that ridiculous number please? Multiple estimates (bspn, Business Insider) have put the total cost to both sides in the $20M-$23M range with $7M most commonly stated as the NFLPA’s expenses to date.

    (once again awaiting deletion)

  35. Smith is part of the problem, an NFL office personal member leaked info to him about the cell phone.
    Of course he’s going to protect the the NFL.
    Lets be real here, if a white guy said the crap he did he would of been fired years ago.
    Stephan A Smith is a racist!

  36. So much misinformation and just plain “stoopid” being spouted here. (1) NFL went to court first to affirm Goodells arbitration (not that it matters anyway, both sides knew the other was going to file and the NFL didn’t want to go into Judge Doty’s court in Minnesota again, so they filed in NY) (2) The NFLPA did NOT agree grant the Commissioner arbitration powers during the last CBA; The Commissioner has ALWAYS had these powers. In fact, the NFLPA tried to have independent arbitration inserted into the CBA but Goodell said he would, “Never give up the right to protect the integrity of the NFL to a non-NFL entity because no one else understands how the NFL works.”

  37. I love ya Florio and agree with pretty much everything that was said. My only gripe about the column is that Steven A and Skip are nothing but hacks who say things to generate controversy. They are not to be taken seriously.

    I mean if you were covering the news media would you pay attention to Jerry Springer or Maury Povich? No they are not serious news people or pundits.

  38. The NFL will be laughing all the way to the bank when the union makes concessions on revenue sharing in order to get an independent arbitrator in place. I’m sure the 2,000+ non-cheating NFL players will be thrilled giving away even more of their funds for something that is completely worthless to them and only of value to one player who got caught with his hand in the cookie jar.

  39. scmems07 says:
    Jun 2, 2016 12:24 PM
    You know, when I go the kitchen and half of the cookies have been eaten, then I see my 3 year old running around with crumbs and chocolate chips all over him, I know he did it, I don’t need proof. When I confront him and he continues to cry and whine about how he didn’t do it, after about 5 minutes of hearing the crying I just let it go to save my sanity.

    That’s about where I am with this, I’m tired of hearing the fans and media members cry and whine about something that you only need common sense to figure out. Brady cheated, he got caught and tried to cover it up by destroying possible evidence, dodging blame by blaming the ball boys and so on… But I need to save my sanity. Just let the crybaby play so I don’t have to hear it anymore.

    Doesn’t matter what the outcome if, the patriots will forever be known in football history as cheaters and whenever people bring up the best teams of all time, there will always be a “but” when the Pat’s get brought up.
    _______________________________________

    That poor three year old. I life time of being blamed for stuff that he may/or may not have done, because Dad’s “common sense” says so.

    What does your common sense say about the Colts balls that were under inflated?

    Let me guess…A cute # or Patriot nickname instead of attempting to answer…

    Your three year old loses, but Patriot Fans Win Again!

    Enjoy your life in the Loser’s Circle!

  40. scmems07 says:
    Jun 2, 2016 12:24 PM
    You know, when I go the kitchen and half of the cookies have been eaten, then I see my 3 year old running around with crumbs and chocolate chips all over him, I know he did it, I don’t need proof. When I confront him and he continues to cry and whine about how he didn’t do it, after about 5 minutes of hearing the crying I just let it go to save my sanity.

    That’s about where I am with this, I’m tired of hearing the fans and media members cry and whine about something that you only need common sense to figure out. Brady cheated, he got caught and tried to cover it up by destroying possible evidence, dodging blame by blaming the ball boys and so on… But I need to save my sanity. Just let the crybaby play so I don’t have to hear it anymore.
    ======================

    I tried to post this about 8 times yesterday, and it kept not getting published. But its a new day, so I’ll give it a go again.

    Lets put a deflategate spin on your example.

    You buy a bag chips at the store. You take it from the shelf, it looks full, it feels full, so in your mind its full.

    You walk in to the kitchen the following day, the bag doesn’t look the same. It isn’t full anymore. It doesn’t feel full. It doesn’t look full.

    You ask your son if he ate the chips. He denies it. You tell him you didn’t eat them, the bag was full when you bought it, and now it isn’t.

    He responds by saying, he didn’t eat the chips, he couldn’t have, the bag is still factory sealed. Your wife comes in and files an amicus brief in support of your son that simply says “contents will settle after packaging”. You are beside yourself with anger, because you have never heard of anything so wildly ridiculous as the bag having less chips today than yesterday. You cant prove the chips were eaten because the bag is in fact factory sealed, so you punish your son for not putting his toy cars away.

    That is the deflategate version of your scenario

  41. Nice try but not the same.

    Here’s the entire story

    The chips might settle from the factory to the store but overnight it wouldn’t settle noticeably.

    Your son uses the nickname chip stealer in a text.

    It’s common knowledge your son steal chips.

    Your son is video taped taking the chips in the bathroom.

    Your son denies this at first and then said he was using the urinal

    There is only a toilet in the bathroom.

    They find texts on your sons phone related to chips and threatening to go to ESPN and I have a sealer for you.

    Now you get it.

    >

  42. Stephen A…is certainly smart enough to know in order to keep the tips from Troy Vincent coming in, he must do him a solid.

    Trying to cast the union as wasting good dollars on a rich boy Brady, only serves to reinforce the notion that 345 Park ave. is squirming.

    All those” friend of court briefs “, must have rattled NFL offices.

  43. luckyforus says:
    Jun 3, 2016 11:29 AM

    Nice try but not the same.

    Here’s the entire story

    The chips might settle from the factory to the store but overnight it wouldn’t settle noticeably.

    Your son uses the nickname chip stealer in a text.

    It’s common knowledge your son steal chips.

    Your son is video taped taking the chips in the bathroom.

    Your son denies this at first and then said he was using the urinal

    There is only a toilet in the bathroom.

    They find texts on your sons phone related to chips and threatening to go to ESPN and I have a sealer for you.

    Now you get it.
    ===========
    Sort of valid, but still disingenuous. Brady didn’t use deflator in texts, so in your argument there wouldn’t be texts on the sons phone, it would be on his friends phone, sent to a 3rd party, none of those texts would be on the sons phone, just as none were on Brady’s phone.

  44. Smith says:
    “Tom Brady and Deflategate, from my understanding, has cost the Players Association millions,” Stephen A. declared. “I have a problem with that. I have a problem with the issue of deflated footballs regressing to a point where it’s taking millions of dollars out of the coffers of players. That’s my issue.”

    Smith blames the millions spent on TB12 when the original punishment should have been a monetary fine. Smith doesn’t get it: Deflategate isn’t about the footballs, its about personal vendettas (in the NFL and media).

    Oh, and regarding the whole cookie and chips analogies. Bottomline, regardless if your kid did or did not take the yum yums, the important issue is how you punish your kid.

    Would you really “ground” your kid for 4 weeks and take-away his birthday party (suspension and draft picks)? Wouldn’t a good dad use it as a teaching moment and not relish in punishing his own flesh and blood?

    Cards fan.

  45. As far as I’m concerned, anyone complaining about how long this case has taken or how much money it is costing, is just looking for a new way to berate Tom Brady.

    The NFL is entirely, 100% responsible for how long this has taken and how much money has been spent on it. Not one iota of responsibility belongs in Tom Brady or the Patriots corner.

    This entire incident should have been over within a week. Once the NFL realized how many mistakes they made, just measuring the PSI of the balls, they should have dropped it, right there. If they were on the level, they would have taken responsibility for their ineptness and the fact that they had never measured the balls during a game before and had no data base of information to compare it to.

    Even if they didn’t want to drop it and believed the Patriots were in the wrong, they should have issued a fine and been done with it. Whether the Patriots would have accepted it or not I don’t know, but that is what should have happened at the most.

    But for an organization to launch a 3 month investigation into footballs that had 1 PSI of air missing, that cost millions of dollars and produced a 154 page report, that they knew very few people would read…there was something more on their mind than deflated balls. Who does that? This has been about something else from the beginning. And they hired a legal team that had a reputation for producing results that the client is asking for.

    Someday, someone will write a tell all book and we’ll find out exactly what this has all been about. In the meantime, those who complain about the time it’s taking, the cost of it all – – complain to the NFL, who are entirely responsible for all of that.

  46. Regarding the amicus briefs, one thing is an absolute certainty.

    The Brady haters won’t read a single word of them. The briefs are light years beyond their intellect level.

  47. You are missing the entire point, I’m not trying to defend Stephen A. But his point is, this isn’t something the NFLPA should be spending any money on, it is something that they need to address when this collective bargaining agreement expires.
    The commissioner has always had this power.
    Going to court over deflated footballs and spending millions is not the proper way to change a collective bargaining agreement that has decades of precedent.
    There are lots of “unfair” things, depending on perspective, that happen everyday.
    The players all agreed for Goodell to continue to have the power he does at the last CBA.
    That is why CBA’s are not permanent, they are renegotiated when they expire, Tom Brady’s suspension comes no where near the importance or unfairness that it would validate the Supreme Court changing the terms of it.
    I have no idea where this could go legally, it the Supreme Court ruled against the NFL?
    Would it warrant the CBA void in the owners eyes and the owners locking out until the terms are renegotiated?
    All so Tom Brady doesn’t have to miss a few games.
    Marcel Reece, for example, was suspended 4 games for PED violations, the NFL stated that they didn’t believe he was trying to cheat or mask anything, but when 2 different approved supplements were taken, they gave a positive result after they metabolized in the body.
    They stated that they believed he did nothing wrong, but guess what, he is still serving the suspension, because it is a positive test.
    That sounds far more unfair to me than Tom Brady’s situation?
    Why doesn’t the NFLPA spend money and go to court for that situation instead?

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