Fewer players are getting arrested in the offseason

The NFL has taken a hard line over the last decade when it comes to players who get into trouble away from the field. Changes to the Personal Conduct Policy in 2007 had an impact, but even more changes (including the introduction of paid leave) sparked by 2014 incidents involving Ray Rice, Greg Hardy, and Adrian Peterson seemed to get the attention of most players.

Arrests are still happening, but not with the same frequency — as indicated by a “days without an arrest” meter that often gets well into the 20s, 30, and 40s between incidents. The fact that the number currently sits at 26 in the break between the end of offseason programs and the opening of training camps shows that players who are left to their own devices are avoiding trouble better than they once did.

There have been nine players arrests since January 1. Last year, there were 13 in the first half of the year. Two years ago, there were 21. In 2013, the number was 29.

It’s not just an offseason phenomenon. At one point last season, more than two months passed between arrests of any of the roughly 2,000 players on rosters or practice squads.

That’s real progress, a testament to the arguably heavy-handed (but apparently effective) efforts of the NFL to beef up the consequences for players accused of wrongdoing. So while viable arguments remain regarding the ability of the Commissioner to serve as a truly fair and impartial arbitrator of disciplinary decisions made by the league office, the current system seems to be working. Well.

47 responses to “Fewer players are getting arrested in the offseason

  1. Even though it’s unpopular, Cris Carter’s advice about a fall guy is actually good. A small percentage of players will inevitably do something stupid. It’s a fact of life.

    This doesn’t mean that the behavior and/or tactic should be condoned, but it makes sense to have the wealthiest of the bunch avoid punishment and pay for the legal fees of the fall guy.

    …awaiting downvotes

  2. It’s a good thing you posted this, because I’d never know it by how focused the media is on every single bad decision a player makes whether they play now or 20 years ago.

  3. These kinds of things ebb and flow.
    Just take a look at the players who are currently in college. I don’t know the statistics, but just a casual look says that there are more college football players involved in rapes, assaults, burglaries, weapon and drug related offenses than ever before.

  4. I believe the teams’ “grateful considerations,” given to local law authorities, are a lot more valuable than they were.

  5. WOW… Imagine, NFL player getting arrested in fewer numbers… What a great day to be alive!!!

  6. It’s only because the usual troublemakers are getting cut and not re-signed. Otherwise, the meter would never make it past 2…

  7. 9 so far this year? That’s 9 times more than England’s Premier League. There’s no need for a Prem League arrest-counter. And the last time a Prem League player was arrested for a gun crime: never. And really, why should pro-sportsmen be acting any different?

  8. streetyson says:

    9 so far this year? That’s 9 times more than England’s Premier League.
    ================================

    Different demographics.

  9. I think law enforcement should contact the employer of anyone they deal with. If you are questioned about something (a neighbor across the street and 2 houses over committed suicide) your employer should be notified.

    If you have a DWI you are suspeneded (without pay) from work for 3 months. If you get into an altercation at a bar,your employer is notified and you are suspended (without pay) for 3 months.

    I don’t condone people acting badly but why are NFL players held to a higher moral standard than sports writers or programmers or teachers or any of us?

  10. Really? This is something that always should hapoen. How many people you know that gets arrested at the pace of nfl player’s? They shouldn’t be applauded for something the majority of Americans do.

  11. intrafinesse says:
    Jun 26, 2016 9:00 PM
    I think law enforcement should contact the employer of anyone they deal with. If you are questioned about something (a neighbor across the street and 2 houses over committed suicide) your employer should be notified.

    If you have a DWI you are suspeneded (without pay) from work for 3 months. If you get into an altercation at a bar,your employer is notified and you are suspended (without pay) for 3 months.

    I don’t condone people acting badly but why are NFL players held to a higher moral standard than sports writers or programmers or teachers or any of us?

    ——————————————————————–

    This might be the worst post ever on PFT. PLEASE dont ever run for any type of office. Do you realize what you just said, “work with out pay” for 3 months for a dwi and bar altercation. Lol so how are you suppose to pay legal fees? How are you suppose to pay your bills/mortgage? How are you going to pay taxes? Your assestment would create a giant problem for people and would lead to a life long of crime of a person just to make ends meet. That is the main problem with people in lower social economic communities. They cant afford stuff they committ crimes, court appointed lawyer, longer prison sentences etccc. Do you really think you should continue to kick a person when they are down for a minor lack of judgement for a bar fight? Work your whole life, go to school great career and one bar fight suspended with out pay then reassess you after you come back. Great plan dude SMH

  12. Most of the Goodell haters are crickets on this post. There are a few Goodell haters that give credit to someone or something else cause it’s good. But if the meter would of been rising the last few years all credit would go to the commish. Goodell is in the position of no win but he gets paid well & keeps the focus on him instead of the owners who could conduct business as usual..

  13. I’m actually kind of surprised more Viking players aren’t out there breaking the law.
    As it seems that organization likes to reward players with salary raises and such for abusing their children.

  14. WRONG! Players are still being arrested, etc but the media isn’t reporting it right now. The closer we get to training camp, THEN the media will publish those stories, when people will pay attention to it and the media can maximize their profits from the arrest.

    We are not stupid…wait…we, CONSERVATIVES are not stupid. We do not believe everything that the media CHOOSES to tell us.

  15. Pro athletes USED to be role models and heroes.
    Now they are ‘narcissist’, ego driven ‘prostitutes’ for hire.
    I long for the day when the NFL will have a bit of integrity attached to it once again.
    Oh, by the way, did I forget to say: “FIRE GOODELL?”
    He is the ‘Vince McMahon’ of all commish’s out there.
    Horrible leader and (probably) person as well…

  16. Yet the only team that sees an increase in arrests are the Seagulls. Funny. I’m sure it’s an anomaly. Just like Pete Carroll’s years of cheating and Lil Russ’ concussion juice. A total anomaly.

  17. Chris Carter must have started that fallguy for hire service he always dreamed of.

    It’s nice that he’s giving back to the community with all his free time.

  18. I was being sarcastic.
    NFL players are subject to those penalties. Not all sports players are, and none of us are.
    At some point it becomes unfair to hold them to a higher standard.

    >.ctiggs says:
    Jun 26, 2016 9:24 PM

  19. Goodell’s disciplinary scheme is getting through the player’s thick heads. Now the colleges need to stop protecting their players.

  20. Just wait a bit.. their official “vacation” is now until mid July. Arrests will sky rocket in the next month…

  21. ctiggs says:
    Jun 26, 2016 9:24 PM
    intrafinesse says:
    Jun 26, 2016 9:00 PM
    I think law enforcement should contact the employer of anyone they deal with. If you are questioned about something (a neighbor across the street and 2 houses over committed suicide) your employer should be notified.

    If you have a DWI you are suspeneded (without pay) from work for 3 months. If you get into an altercation at a bar,your employer is notified and you are suspended (without pay) for 3 months.

    I don’t condone people acting badly but why are NFL players held to a higher moral standard than sports writers or programmers or teachers or any of us?

    ——————————————————————–

    This might be the worst post ever on PFT. PLEASE dont ever run for any type of office. Do you realize what you just said, “work with out pay” for 3 months for a dwi and bar altercation. Lol so how are you suppose to pay legal fees? How are you suppose to pay your bills/mortgage? How are you going to pay taxes? Your assestment would create a giant problem for people and would lead to a life long of crime of a person just to make ends meet. That is the main problem with people in lower social economic communities. They cant afford stuff they committ crimes, court appointed lawyer, longer prison sentences etccc. Do you really think you should continue to kick a person when they are down for a minor lack of judgement for a bar fight? Work your whole life, go to school great career and one bar fight suspended with out pay then reassess you after you come back. Great plan dude SMH
    ___________________
    Wow ctiggs. You started your response calling intrafinesse’ post the worst ever on pft. Then you went on to post the worst response ever. How could you completely miss the facetious nature of intras post? His whole point was that he feels NFL players are held to a higher standard than the rest of us and to drive the point home he presented sceanarios where regular workers would be subjected to the same punishments as NFL players thus demonstrating the complete unworkability of such a uniform system. He was expecting us to extrapolate that since these harsh punishments would never be sustainable in regular society, they should not be applied to NFL players. But instead you read his remarks as actually wanting those punishments imposed on regular workers and proceeded to go off on some Captain Obvious rant. Too funny.

    Here’s the appropriate response to intrafinesse. The reason that NFL players are held to a different standard than the rest of us regular joes is that they are public figures and they work for teams that make a lot of money based on a certain public image. These teams and the league in general rely on people liking what they see and watching the product on tv, watching the commercials, buying merchandise, showing up at games, and conversing about the product in a way that may draw others to the product. Any behavior by an employee of this institution that may threaten this public confidence and negatively affect the bottom line is not to be tolerated. Since the NFL cannot make people watch or buy, they rely on people wanting to. So the players who make a lot of money from this arrangement are expected to behave in a way that enhances it. And that doesn’t just mean for 3 hours on Sundays or Mondays or Thursdays. But always. Because players are the product. May not sound fair, but they can always come join us regular joes where we can engage in certain behaviors in relative obscurity. Their choice.

  22. abninf says:
    Jun 26, 2016 8:54 PM

    streetyson says:

    9 so far this year? That’s 9 times more than England’s Premier League.
    ================================

    Different demographics.

    Uh, no. Soccer is a working class sport. Many of the players came from the same type of projects and ghettos that football/basketball players came from. Before you blame US media for intense scrutiny, the British papers are ruthless when it comes to stalking celebrities.

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