NFL cites “shared responsibility” with NFLPA to investigate Al Jazeera allegations

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The simmering controversy between the NFL and the NFL Players Association regarding a December report from Al Jazeera implicating multiple players finally has hit full boil.

After months of delays resulting from an apparent inability of the two sides to agree as to the necessity and scope of an investigation following a report that implicated Packers linebackers Clay Matthews and Julius Peppers, free-agent defensive lineman Mike Neal, Steelers linebacker James Harrison, and former NFL quarterback Peyton Manning, the two sides have gone public with their dispute.

Said the NFLPA on Monday: “The NFL has chosen to initiate an investigation of these players based upon now-recanted statements that appeared in an Al Jazeera report. The NFLPA requested from the NFL any additional evidence supporting an investigation of the players; the NFL did not provide any such evidence, nor did they inform the NFLPA or the players that any such evidence exists. Instead, the NFL has decided to publicly pressure the players into submission. We will continue to advise our players about their rights and hold the NFL accountable.”

The NFL, which informed the non-retired players that they’ll be interviewed at the outset of training camp, has since responded.

“The NFLPA and NFL are obligated and have a shared responsibility to look into allegations that could impact the integrity of competition on the field and the health of our players,” NFL spokesman Brian McCarthy told Mark Kaboly of the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review. “We have been obtaining and reviewing numerous records, conducting multiple interviews and working with other entities. We have made no conclusions but the report merits a review, including interviews with the players named.”

The NFLPA wasn’t impressed by the explanation.

“The only thing we are saying to the league is, ‘Show us what credible evidence you have, so that we can understand what the basis of your investigation is,'” NFLPA spokesman George Atallah told Kaboly. “Because if the basis of your investigation is simply four sentences of dialogue exchanged in this media report from a guy who took back everything he said in a YouTube video, that’s not enough. . . . It’s not like there is some positive test or missed test out there. Literally, this is only about the media report from December. . . . So we have asked them to clarify what their [additional] evidence is, and they have so far told us nothing about that.”

The case raises an important question regarding the quality and nature of allegations that will trigger an investigation into potential PED violations unrelated to a positive test. It’s one thing for a player to be implicated in, for example, a criminal investigation of a doping lab. It’s another for allegations not confirmed or corroborated to result in a full-blown probe.

There’s a line that falls somewhere between justification for an investigation and a P.R.-driven fishing expedition. It’s unclear where that line is, but this specific situation could help define it in future cases.

Atallah will join Tuesday’s PFT Live on NBC Sports Radio to discuss the issue in further detail. An invitation also has been extended to the league.

72 responses to “NFL cites “shared responsibility” with NFLPA to investigate Al Jazeera allegations

  1. The league won’t show.

    Peyton Manning does not discus his wife’s private medical history (as he should not – the NFL has no rights there).

    Count on it.

  2. “…a shared responsibility…”? Since when did the NFL ever decide to involve the Players Association in any investigations? I don’t remember Ted Wells telling the Dolphins or Patriots that he was sharing responsibility for his investigations? If the NFL believes in shared responsibility, why did Ray Rice and Adrian Peterson have to sue Roger Goodell? The answer is that the NFL conducts investigations when and how it feels like doing so, with no regard for the collective bargaining agreement, and Goodell is a loose cannon who has his own agenda that trumps all other considerations.

  3. I’m sure Russia would have loved to have the NFLPA holding their hand when the ARD documentary came out. And if the NFLPA could have obstructed the WADA investigation, all the better.

    Get real Mike. Very few anti doping organisations if any have the resources to do what documentary makers do.

    The NFLPA is protecting players who may have cheated other players out of Wins/contracts/playing time/careers.

    The link to Neal and Matthews is also not solely built on Sly, even though I think it’s ridiculous anybody would take his recanting seriously.

  4. The NFL must think “if we shoot ourselves in both feet we can’t move forward”

    Case closed. Nothing to see here. Move along

  5. Anyone get the feeling an investigation into the NFL would yield a great deal more evidence of corruption than one into its players? #integrity

  6. Someone explain to Attalah that you do not start an investigation with credible evidence. Rather, you investigate serious allegations to find credible evidence. If none is found then that should be the outcome but you have to investigate.

    While Pats fans have arguable grounds to disagree with NFL investigation findings on fairness grounds, the NFLPA reluctance to establish whether there is truth to the allegations is starting to feel like they are trying surpress something bad.

    If nothing else, just prove the players innocence.

  7. This “investigation” six months after the initial report smells like publication relations only.

    In the interest of fairness, in conjunction with cries from the haters, all accused players must immediately hand over their cell phones to Goodell. Goodell must immediately hire another law firm to the tune of $4M to investigate and issue a 250 page report.

    Anything less is exactly what it appeared to be, a predetermined witch hunt to screw the Pats.

  8. Definition of overreach, the league needs to get over itself and respect the players (who don’t cheat and destroy evidence).

  9. Nah…. The only reason the NFL wants their noses
    in it, is to protect The Shield from anything that could
    be embarrassing.

  10. Please NFL, use some common sense and let this go. The words “Credible” and “Al Jazeera” do not belong in the same sentence. Manning has ridden off into the sunset and the other players named have no proven history of using performance enhancing drugs.

    Because Al Jazeera – the American hating media outlet – put this story forward I give it no credence whatsoever. Be smart Goodell, let it go and don’t create a mess chasing your tail based on unfounded assertions from a deplorable media outlet.

  11. After the abysmal way the NFL handled the entire deflategate investigation the players and NFLPA needs to question the NFL every step of the way. Regardless of what you believe Brady did or didn’t do there is almost no disputing that the process the NFL used to come to their conclusion was sloppy and purposefully deceitful.

  12. This is why the player’s union will never be accepted as willing to promote teh game. I get that the claims are most likely, and for most players, to be without merit. But if the players are innocent, what is the problem with being interviewed?

    My suspicion is that a few of the players have something to worry about and the union is reflexively trying to protect them.

  13. Some clown writes an article accusing NFL players of using a bannd substance with no evidence and the NFL is going to investigate. The more we hear about this report the more clowns will make things up just to get their name out. I would understand if they actually had evidence like deflated footballs, text messages, and one of the guys destroys something that could clear his name like a cell phone but destroys it anyway. That’s evidence.

  14. 1, The NFL has an unfortunate obligation to look into this matter whether recanted or interpreted as recanted. It was published. If the parties are innocent they should cooperate.

    2. The NFL and the NFLPA should have a shared responsibility on these issues. The NFLPA represents the interest of all of its members just like any other Union. The NFLPA members through the CBA get a large percentage of revenue therefor it is in the players interest to protect the game and their $$$$. The rank and file members deserve and need this representation more so than the knuckleheads or super stars. Unfortunately the CBA is judged by things like the franchise tag and how discipline or infractions or dealt with. These matter little to the greater majority of members of the NFLPA who benefit from the percent of revenue in an effort to push the $$ down the ladder.

    3. The league would benefit by sharing responsibility with the NFLPA by having boards to review and rule on these issues.

    4. Ownership apparently is content to let Goodell be the lightning rod for criticism on these matters as long as he delivers the profits. By having a shared responsibility it takes the target off the NFL/Goodell and promotes fairness and player responsibility. Goodell can concentrate on business.

    5. If a player is found guilty and is disciplined under these guidelines let him pay for a law suit not the rank and file of the union.

  15. If they’re gonna try to disprove 400 year old scientific principles to sully the good name of the GOAT, then the least they could do put forth a nice front and pretend they want to “catch” Manning.
    It’s only fair.
    SMH

    Manning*
    Harrison*
    Mathews*
    Peppers*
    Von-boy*
    Von’s – co-conspirator Pee Test Boy*
    Broncos*

    How’s it feel Donkey fans?
    To know that no one outside of the Rocky Mountain state recognizes any of your SBs as legit?

  16. there’s that word again…..

    integrity

    no matter how many times Goodell and/or the NFL front office use that word, nobody is going to believe them.

  17. “The only thing we are saying to the league is, ‘Show us what credible evidence you have, so that we can understand what the basis of your investigation is,’” NFLPA spokesman George Atallah told Kaboly.
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^

    All one has to do is loo at a photo of Clay Mathews before he started using PED’s…

    In HS he was 165 pounds and couldn’t crack the starting lineup on the team his dad coached.

    Now he’s 255.

  18. So if a “reputable” news source such as Al Jazeera reports something, it’s the responsibility of the NFL and NFLPA to investigate?

    Silly me, I foolishly assumed that criminal activity is handled by the police and FBI, but what do I know.

    When the NFL is done with this case, I can’t wait until they begin focusing on combating terrorism. They can send some operatives (hopefully lead by Goodell in person) to Syria.

  19. Al Jazeera reporter Deborah Davies confirmed to multiple outlets that there were corroborating sources beyond the video. I understand the NFLPA’s stance that basing an investigation off a news report may represent a slippery slope but it is not as though Al Jazeera is TMZ. It is a major multinational news source. Their investigation was targeting international doping primarily with the Olympics in mind, they went where the story took them. In this instance one would think it would be in the union’s and it’s members best interest to view this as a one off and help the league whitewash it.
    Let’s face it, this is just about PR. 345 Park Ave wants this to go away every bit as much as the players do. If they didn’t then they would already have pursued it with the kind of aggression normally reserved for bounties, ball deflation, bullying or tampering.

  20. The Brady case has set a precedent for the commissioner and his powers. Unless the US Supreme Court hears Brady’s case (which is the biggest waste of tax dollars in history) then the foundation is set and any claim of impropriety which includes maintaining a fair and level playing field falls solely and wholly under the jurisdiction of the commissioner. Whether or not the NFLPA wants to participate or not, that is their choice but they are being given unprecedented access to participate in a commissioners investigation. With the precedent set that the Brady investigation made absolutely clear, if the players and/or the NFLPA doesn’t want to abide by the courts ruling of Goodells power, then he has the authority to punish them as he sees fit with fines or lost playing time. The answer to me is easy. For any player that is under investigation, you don’t play until you do your interview. For Manning, you can participate in no NFL approved function until you interview. Plain and simple. No allegations, no hassles, but if you want to play, you have to pay.

  21. 12brichandfamous says:
    Jun 28, 2016 12:02 AM
    The league won’t show.

    Peyton Manning does not discus his wife’s private medical history (as he should not – the NFL has no rights there).

    Count on it.

    —————-

    Under what circumstances would a healthy woman in her 30s require bootleg HGH imported from China prescribed by anyone other than her physician?

  22. Some clown writes an article accusing NFL players of using a bannd substance with no evidence and the NFL is going to investigate. The more we hear about this report the more clowns will make things up just to get their name out. I would understand if they actually had evidence like deflated footballs, text messages, and one of the guys destroys something that could clear his name like a cell phone but destroys it anyway. That’s evidence.
    __________________________________________

    There is already more evidence against these guys then there ever will be against Brady. Having HGH shipped to your house in your wife’s name is pretty incriminating, wouldn’t you say?

    Plus, your logic is way off. The Colts balls were also deflated – did they cheat? There is evidence right there, so why didn’t the NFL investigate?

    How could Brady prove his innocence with the cell phone? If Brady provided his cell phone, absolutely nothing would have changed. We already know there was nothing incriminating on the phone given the league had all the other phones. He also went above and beyond and provided a log of all texts, emails, calls, etc. The NFL decided not to act on that info. How dense do you have to be to not realize the cell phone never mattered? There is nothing on the cell phone…..if there was, it would have come up with the other guys. You truthers are pathetic…..you know all this but just stick your fingers in your ears and scream la la la.

  23. xinellum says:
    Jun 28, 2016 8:42 AM
    The Brady case has set a precedent for the commissioner and his powers. Unless the US Supreme Court hears Brady’s case (which is the biggest waste of tax dollars in history) then the foundation is set and any claim of impropriety which includes maintaining a fair and level playing field falls solely and wholly under the jurisdiction of the commissioner. Whether or not the NFLPA wants to participate or not, that is their choice but they are being given unprecedented access to participate in a commissioners investigation. With the precedent set that the Brady investigation made absolutely clear, if the players and/or the NFLPA doesn’t want to abide by the courts ruling of Goodells power, then he has the authority to punish them as he sees fit with fines or lost playing time. The answer to me is easy. For any player that is under investigation, you don’t play until you do your interview. For Manning, you can participate in no NFL approved function until you interview. Plain and simple. No allegations, no hassles, but if you want to play, you have to pay.
    =====================
    Sorry but that is utter nonsense. To be fair it’s not entirely your fault since Goodell has decided that an allegation in and of itself is enough to warrant punishment. The reaction from the NFLPA, while non-cooperative, is completely justified. The NFL has already demonstrated on numerous occasions now they simply cannot conduct a fair investigation. And the NFL expects the NFLPA to agree to an investigation based on what somebody states in the media? This isn’t an issue of power. It’s a 100% trust issue. The NFLPA doesn’t trust Goodell. And they shouldn’t.

  24. xinellum says:
    Jun 28, 2016 8:42 AM
    …Unless the US Supreme Court hears Brady’s case (which is the biggest waste of tax dollars in history)…
    ———————
    I disagree not because of Brady, but because of precedent – if the NFL has its way on this it essentially says that employers can abuse the CBA (which clearly states that the Commish has to act in a “fair” manner as arbitrator) and ignore due process. Arbitration has meaning in US employment law and Goodell, by denying cross-examination of accusers, denying fresh evidence of the defense, introducing fresh evidence against Brady, and crucially lying about Brady’s testimony and exceeding the findings of the Wells Report, clearly DID NOT ARBITRATE! Hence, this would set a very dangerous precedent for all NFL players and potentially all employees governed by CBAs.

  25. The NFLPA’s position seems specious.

    Investigations are designed to uncover evidence. If the evidence was uncovered already there would be no need to investigate.

    Meh, it’s just part of the NFL stew of integrity.

  26. Clay Matthews should be suspended. You shouldn’t be allowed to be that good.

  27. Peyton does not discuss his wife’s medical history. This has gone on long enough. My wife is a pediatrician here in Phoenix. Any doctor that would prescribe HGH to a pregnant or soon to be pregnant wife, would lose their License to practice medicine. HGH would or could cause serious damage to the fetus. Either Peyton gave HGH to his wife and should go to prison for 10 years or, like all the others that have lied, he obviously took HGH and should of been suspended last year. There is no way that Ashley took that HGH period. QB goes from not being able to throw a football with Eli over 15 yards, to breaking the touchdown record months later. Then after not using anymore has the worst year of his career. Wake up haters. Peyton, like many others in the NFL take HGH or Steroids.

  28. The NFLPA’s sole purpose is to let players get away with as much as possible.

    Most Union’s spend the majority of their money on the liars, cheaters and drug users (because the people who don’t get in trouble rarely need union representation)… Doubt the NFLPA is any different.

  29. 1 thing I learned from this is that lots of people are unaware of Al Jazeera’s rep. Maybe this will enlighten the masses.

  30. jchipwood says:
    Jun 28, 2016 7:14 AM
    Some clown writes an article accusing NFL players of using a bannd substance with no evidence and the NFL is going to investigate. The more we hear about this report the more clowns will make things up just to get their name out. I would understand if they actually had evidence like deflated footballs, text messages, and one of the guys destroys something that could clear his name like a cell phone but destroys it anyway. That’s evidence.
    _____________________

    It is painfully obvious you do not know what you are talking about. ‘Some clown writes an article’??? It was a multinational documentary primarily intended to expose the ease of doping access to athletes and in particular Olympic athletes. In it former British hurdler Liam Collins went undercover as an athlete seeking drugs to help him qualify for the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The story unfolded from there. That Taylor Teagarden was filmed admitting usage and Collins actually had a regimen designed for him gives the documentary more than a small measure of credibility.
    The claims of NFL players usage may have been no more than braggadocio on Sly’s part but the fact that he supplied Collins with an injection while at the same time being partners in a fitness center where many NFL players, including Neal, Keller and several Dolphins players, worked out that has since folded justifies a closer look. Through the fitness center there is a direct connection between the admitted and documented doper Sly and NFL and MLB players. That connection can’t be casually dismissed with any credibility.

    “The more we hear about this report the more clowns will make things up just to get their name out.” The documentary was shown more than 6 months ago, what is taking your ‘clowns’ so long? Other than the circling of some wagons precious little has happened from an NFL perspective since. One can’t help but wonder why you are so quick to throw a team you envy under the bus but want to dismiss an investigative piece that includes undercover video which could expand Balco style to implicate past and present players on the team you root for.

  31. There was an accusation from a credible news source (and most people in the news industry regarded Al Jazeera America as being credible, despite what the people here think). The NFL should have been looking into that accusation six months ago, and the NFLPA should have cooperated. And if it really is not credible after all, I suspect that it will be like most other investigations of its sort. Deflategate is the exception, not the rule.

  32. m8gaman says:
    Jun 28, 2016 9:52 AM
    Why doesn’t Manning just man up and accept that he is guilty?
    _ _ _ _ _ _
    Guilty of what?

  33. jchipwood says:
    Jun 28, 2016 7:14 AM
    Some clown writes an article accusing NFL players of using a bannd substance with no evidence and the NFL is going to investigate. The more we hear about this report the more clowns will make things up just to get their name out. I would understand if they actually had evidence like deflated footballs, text messages, and one of the guys destroys something that could clear his name like a cell phone but destroys it anyway. That’s evidence.
    —————————————–
    Some clown posts a message on PFT accusing the GOAT of something easily explainable by basic SCIENCE and pretends like a personal cell phone would have damning information on it even though the NFL has all of the messages through the ball boy’s phones so that doesn’t really add up either. The more misinformation out there the more clowns will post messages making things up that they clearly don’t understand or use basic logic to comprehend. I would understand if they actually had evidence like Manning going from the best year ever to falling off the face of the planet in 1 year’s time span while his wife conveniently has HGH shipped to her doorstep or Clay Mathews at 165 lbs in HS is now 255 lbs and visibly roided up. That’s evidence.

  34. mmack666 says:
    Jun 28, 2016 10:15 AM
    m8gaman says:
    Jun 28, 2016 9:52 AM
    Why doesn’t Manning just man up and accept that he is guilty?
    _ _ _ _ _ _
    Guilty of what?
    ————–
    Just playing the same card that irrational Brady haters do, there is at least as much evidence against Manning in this matter than 0.2 psi that science can easily explain.

  35. mmack666 says:
    Jun 28, 2016 10:15 AM

    Guilty of what?
    ——————-

    Using HGH. Have you been living under a rock for the last six months?

  36. I will be objective. The NFLPA is 100% correct to be skeptical of anything the NFL does.

    #ButPEDtonStillCheated
    #EveryoneKnowsThat

    🙂

  37. Used of a banned substance is a six game suspension (first time infraction). Why the drama? The Pats were punished not because of jealousy but because they showed a consistent pattern of cheating. The NFL covered all that up burning the Spygate tapes and Godell and Kraft were best buddies. The Pats had preferential treatment in the NFL (including the refs always being on their side), so they thought that they could openly cheat without consequences. People complain about inaction from the NFL, yet the MLB (which is implicated too) is also inactive. Funny also that no team owner (including Kraft) is asking for a deep investigation about this issue because this could open a big Pandora box for the NFL.

  38. getyourownname says:
    Jun 28, 2016 7:05 AM

    This is why the player’s union will never be accepted as willing to promote teh game. I get that the claims are most likely, and for most players, to be without merit. But if the players are innocent, what is the problem with being interviewed?
    ———————————————-

    Are you kidding me? Look at the interviews in deflategate, bountygate, bullygate (XXXgate is stupid, stop it). The players involved all gave multiple interviews that were completely disregarded by the NFL in the pursuit of good PR. The NFL doesn’t give a damn about the info gained from the interviews. They just want people to know that they ‘are taking these allegations very seriously and will investigate to get to the bottom of it’. What they mean is ‘We don’t want this happening because it affects players on too many teams, and thus the entire league. When its a single team, ie the Dolphins, the Saints or the Patriots, NAIL EM TO THE WALL CUZ THEY’RE CHEATERS AND BULLIES! so that it looks to the world like the NFL takes care to keep the league clean. When its players across 6, 7, 8 teams, then it becomes like the steroid era of baseball. Its a culture, and it damages the entire product. The NFL can’t have that.

  39. There is one indisputable fact….Manning had HGH delivered to his home, and was fully aware of that delivery. This fact alone demands an investigation. This fact alone is more evidence of wrong doing than generally aware of something that most likely occurred naturally.

  40. In it former British hurdler Liam Collins went undercover as an athlete seeking drugs to help him qualify for the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
    ————————————————

    You mean Liam Collins the guy who duped some investors $5 million in a big scam? Yep, he is certainly a credible source, just like AJ, the network with no agenda whatsoever.

  41. hope this dissent prevails

    .
    The Commissioner’s authority is, as the majority emphasizes, broad.  But it is not limitless, and its boundaries are defined by the CBA.  Here, the CBA grants the Commissioner in his capacity as arbitrator only the authority to decide.                                                        
    The majority again gives me too much credit in stating that the Association did not raise this argument.  
    I read the Association’s brief to make two arguments with respect to alternative penalties.  The first is that
    the Player Policies, and in particular the “Other Uniform/Equipment Violations” provision, governed
    Brady’s misconduct here and necessitates that he receive no more than a fine.  I agree with the majority
    that this has no merit.    The second, however, is that the Commissioner’s failure to discuss certain
    probative terms—in particular, the “Other Uniform/Equipment Violations” provision and the stickum prohibition (obviously, I find only the latter actually probative)—reflects that the Commissioner was not actually construing the CBA, the only limitation imposed on an arbitrator acting within the scope of his
    authority.  And, as the majority acknowledges, in support of that argument, the Association contends that
    the Commissioner’s “CBA defiance is only underscored by his reliance on the Steroid Policy.”   

    The Commissioner exceeded that limited authority when he decided instead that Brady could be suspended for four games based on misconduct found for the first time in the Commissioner’s decision.    This breach of the limits on the Commissioner’s authority is exacerbated by the unprecedented and virtually unexplained nature of the penalty imposed.    Confirming the arbitral award under such circumstances neither enforces the intent of the parties nor furthers the “federal policy that federal courts should enforce [arbitration] agreements . . . and that industrial peace can be best obtained only in that way.”  

    The Article 46 appeals process is designed to provide
    a check against the Commissioner’s otherwise unfettered authority to impose discipline for “conduct detrimental.”    But the Commissioner’s murky
    explanation of Brady’s discipline undercuts the protections for which the NFLPA bargained on Brady’s, and others’, behalf.  It is ironic that a process designed to ensure fairness to all players has been used unfairly against one player.

    I respectfully dissent.

  42. skoobyfl says:
    Jun 28, 2016 6:31 AM

    Definition of overreach, the league needs to get over itself and respect the players (who don’t cheat and destroy evidence).
    —————————————————–
    Oh you sneaky devil. I see what you did there. Destroy evidence. You’re talking about Brady aren’t you? You sly fox. Now then, seeing how you sorta, kinda brought it up please explain this for the class. When asked directly if the league had any evidence of Brady’s participation in a scheme to deflate footballs the league lawyer answered simply and directly. No. So, you little scoundrel, what evidence have you unearthed that a legal team and 5 million dollars couldn’t dredge up?

  43. tajuara says:
    Jun 28, 2016 10:49 AM

    Used of a banned substance is a six game suspension (first time infraction). Why the drama? The Pats were punished not because of jealousy but because they showed a consistent pattern of cheating. The NFL covered all that up burning the Spygate tapes and Godell and Kraft were best buddies. The Pats had preferential treatment in the NFL (including the refs always being on their side), so they thought that they could openly cheat without consequences. People complain about inaction from the NFL, yet the MLB (which is implicated too) is also inactive. Funny also that no team owner (including Kraft) is asking for a deep investigation about this issue because this could open a big Pandora box for the NFL.
    ——————————————————
    Dang! The inside connections you have are AMAZING! I mean your inside knowledge is off the charts! The refs were always on the side of the Pats? Really?! WOW! Consistent pattern of cheating? Holy smokes! I thought there was only spygate but you and your inside sources must be hiding the actual evidence of this so called pattern of cheating. The only pattern most folks know about is the obnoxious pattern of being consistent contenders year in and year out. Hey? You got any info on who’s this year’s NFL darling selected to go out with a Super Bowl win? If so, share with the group. That kind of info could make us quite profitable.

  44. “the basis of your investigation is simply four sentences of dialogue exchanged in this media report from a guy who took back everything he said in a YouTube video”
    –NFLPA
    ————-
    Open and shut, case closed.

  45. You cried when they didn’t investigate and now you are crying because they are investigating. Wow.

  46. “Peyton Manning does not discus his wife’s private medical history (as he should not – the NFL has no rights there).”

    Oh… so kinda like Tom Brady doesn’t give his personal cell phone to the NFL.

  47. “All accused players must immediately hand over their cell phones to Goodell.”

    Simple question – How many of you out there would trust Goodell to protect the contents of your cell phones?

    Thumbs up means no, are you kidding, not in this lifetime, etc.

    Thumbs down means you would trust them.

  48. VenerableAxiom says:
    Jun 28, 2016 11:30 AM
    “the basis of your investigation is simply four sentences of dialogue exchanged in this media report from a guy who took back everything he said in a YouTube video”
    –NFLPA
    ————-
    Open and shut, case closed.
    _____________________

    Thank you judge Axiom for that learned opinion. Now if you could just as easily explain away the fact that Sly provided Collins with an injection while he was partners in a FL fitness center Neal and many other NFL players used that would just be great. Again, there’s every possibility that Sly was full of it in terms of who he named in the video but that connection bears investigation. If only to dispel all doubt.

  49. Brady cheated. Peyton didn’t. Get over it.
    _________________________________________

    Translation: Peyton choked big time in the SB versus Seattle so we are OK with him. But Brady made our spectacular defense sputter, especially in the 4th quarter, and put a stop to this so-called dynasty we Seattle fans thought we would have.

  50. mmack66 says:
    Jun 28, 2016 10:32 AM
    mmack666 says:
    Jun 28, 2016 10:15 AM

    Guilty of what?
    ——————-

    Using HGH. Have you been living under a rock for the last six months?
    _ _ _ _ _ _ _
    So, who found him or any others guilty? The investigation hasn’t even commenced.

  51. Translation: Donald Trump is gonna build a wall around Tom Brady…and it’s gonna be yuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuge! And we’re gonna make the rest of the League pay for it!!!

  52. Believe it or not, “Shared Responsibility” is not what the NFLPA wants anymore than the owners do. Shared responsibility, means shared blame.

    Currently, the NFLPA benefits from being able to identify everything the Commissioner/Owners does wrong without really shining the light on itself or taking any responsibility. The same way the owners benefit from hiding behind Goodell who essentially just does what they say, so does the NFLPA. The NFLPA rarely (if ever) calls for Roger Goodell to be fired. The truth is, both sides enjoy the cover fire, and I doubt the NFLPA is about to give up the enviable position of being able to recuse itself of any responsibility in anything except for acting in the broad scope of “acting in the players’ best interest.”

  53. mmack666 says:
    Jun 28, 2016 1:14 PM

    So, who found him or any others guilty? The investigation hasn’t even commenced.
    ——————————-

    The court of public opinion. Everyone that isn’t a Colts fan, Broncos fan, or a Patriots Hater knows he is a guilty cheater.

    The evidence that he used the HGH, that Manning confirmed was sent to his house, is compelling, if not overwhelming.

  54. It’s a shame that a clean, hard working all-pro like Harrison has to have his name associated with those drug aided underachievers in green bay.

  55. shared responsibility ?????

    This is NFL CODE for: Let’s portray as if we really are investigating PED use and then pick & choose who the fall-guy will be. We cannot have a full-blown exposure of the wide spread use of PEDton Manning type news coverage.

  56. Brady cheated. Peyton didn’t. Get over it.
    _________________________________________

    Translation: Peyton choked big time in the SB versus Seattle so we are OK with him. But Brady made our spectacular defense sputter, especially in the 4th quarter, and put a stop to this so-called dynasty we Seattle fans thought we would have.

    ——————————————————–

    Only after 5 starters went down, but oh, my bad, I forgot that injuries are only valid excuses if you are the NE Patriots. May I also remind you that in AFCCGs Manning has the upper hand and even outplayed Brady (with a noddle arm and unable to throw more than 10 yards at at time) in the last one. I like that you put an emphasis in the 4th quarter because in both games (against the Seahawks and Broncos) Brady put big numbers because key defensive players went down. I hope that you enjoy Garopolo this upcoming season. Well deserved.

  57. seahawkboymike says:
    Jun 28, 2016 12:21 PM
    Brady cheated. Peyton didn’t. Get over it.

    ——————–
    If by “cheated” you mean put up 350 yards and 2 4th quarter TDs, exposed the Seahawks porous secondary and made Richard Sherman cry then yes…..you are correct he did all those things…..

  58. Goodel said ” Brady’s use of footballs 0.5 psi lower then the 12.5 limit was equal to PED use”

    And that was based purely on “More likely than Not”, without any actual proof or evidence.

    FACT : Mrs. HGH Manning has a boxload of PEDs sent to Peyton Mannings house. This carries the “More Likely than Not” adjucation to a much higher and credible degree of ‘GUILT by Association’.

  59. blessedunliketherest says:
    Jun 28, 2016 9:24 AM

    Some clown writes an article accusing NFL players of using a bannd substance with no evidence and the NFL is going to investigate. The more we hear about this report the more clowns will make things up just to get their name out. I would understand if they actually had evidence like deflated footballs, text messages, and one of the guys destroys something that could clear his name like a cell phone but destroys it anyway. That’s evidence.
    …………………..

    Actually better evidence in that case was the Colts admitting they tampered with the intercepted Patriots football after ref inspection by testing the air pressure, thus letting out air. But the NFL wasn’t interested in that, they like to have their conclusions first and then work backwards from there.

  60. I know I’m late to this conversation and most of obvious, and well deserved NFL/Goodell bashing has already occurred.

    I will make this observation here and possibly on other stories…

    BSPN and the Park Ave Goon Squad have told 64+ lies regarding Deflategate.

    The NFL continues to deny that there is any link whatsoever between the violent collisions in football and concussions. However, they have changes kickoffs. Hmmmmm…

    It’s safe to say that Al Jazeera is now a more credible source than BSPN and the NFL.

  61. mmack66 says:
    Jun 28, 2016 2:54 PM
    mmack666 says:
    Jun 28, 2016 1:14 PM

    So, who found him or any others guilty? The investigation hasn’t even commenced.
    ——————————-

    The court of public opinion. Everyone that isn’t a Colts fan, Broncos fan, or a Patriots Hater knows he is a guilty cheater.

    The evidence that he used the HGH, that Manning confirmed was sent to his house, is compelling, if not overwhelming.
    _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
    Ahh, public opinion. Now I get it. Been under my rock too long! So the fact remains none of these guys have really been found guilty of anything and the only player suspended for now is Tom Brady. Thanks for enlightening me. Back to my rock…

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