Blandino: NFL doesn’t have technology to test PSI with computer chips

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The catch rule prompted an invitation for Tuesday’s PFT Live on NBC Sports Radio to NFL V.P. of officiating Dean Blandino. Recent reports about the use of computer chip technology fueled a separate discussion that created some news.

Blandino acknowledged that computer chips will be used in the preseason, and possibly on Thursday nights. In confirming that the chips won’t be used to monitor air pressure in footballs, he disputed a recent report from ESPN.com that the technology is available.

“The technology now is not available,” Blandino said. “It’s not something that we’ve discussed. We’re focusing on the protocol and the chain of custody and things like that before the game, so that’s not something that’s been discussed with the chip technology that’s being used.”

The disagreement could be a matter of semantics. Yes, technology exists to monitor air pressure in tires. But that doesn’t mean anyone has developed a device that would monitor air pressure inside a football in real time — and ideally alert game officials to a situation where the football is below 12.5 PSI or above 13.5 PSI.

Until that technology is developed and implemented, the only way to determine PSI levels will be to check the footballs manually. Blandino confirmed that the 2015 program of spot checks will be used again in 2016.

“No change to the guidelines, and so the officials will go through their normal protocol and testing footballs and marking them once they meet the requirements, and then there will be spot checks throughout the season,” Blandino said.

So I then decided to fish for a general acknowledgement that, at times, footballs are indeed below 12.5 PSI. So I asked Blandino if he had access to spot-check PSI numbers that have not yet been released publicly, and apparently never will be. Blandino said that the results of the spot checks were not provided to the officiating department.

“We kept track of the footballs pregame and then the spot check, that’s really NFL Security is involved in that,” Blandino said. “So on the officiating side, we weren’t involved in the PSI and that part of it. We really were focusing on the chain of custody and the protocol and who had access to the footballs and how they were getting from point A to point B before the game.”

So the information was obtained by NFL Security and not disclosed?

“Correct,” Blandino said. “NFL Security would log that information and that’s how the procedure took place.”

This explanation seems to conflict with the document setting forth the document explaining the new game-day procedures regarding periodic spot checks: “All game ball information will be recorded on the Referee’s Report, which must be submitted to the League office by noon on the day following the game.”

The PSI numbers obtained during the spot checks apparently weren’t submitted. Which possibly was done to ensure that PSI information the NFL won’t be releasing publicly also won’t be leaked.

67 responses to “Blandino: NFL doesn’t have technology to test PSI with computer chips

  1. Geeze does this guy ever tell the truth?

    Of course the technology is available. If its “not available to the NFL” its because they have intentionally not gone looking for it.

    And after all they don’t want that data, it would prove Brady and the Pats are innocent. They hid the data they collected last year because it proved that.

    What a collection of liars Goodell and his cronies are

  2. Get Brady to test them. I hear he’s available for the first month of the season.

  3. The reason it wasn’t submitted was because the NFL wasn’t going to engage in Kraft’s plausible deniability. Maybe had he handled himself with a little class this who thing could have been avoided. Regardless his “scientific fact” was based on assumptions of what the starting PSI levels were because they were never recorded. At best the Pats had an estimate which isn’t a fact because it’s based on assumptions.

  4. Wait a minute – from his SiriusXM interview in Feb 2016:

    “We did spot checks throughout the year, and we measured PSI levels and recorded that information,” Blandino said, per The Boston Globe. “So right now, we’re evaluating the information. We didn’t have any violations this year, but again we’re still in that evaluation phase to look at the information and then we’ll see what that tells us.”

    He says right now “we’re evaluating the information”. Maybe he is not including himself in “we”, but sounds like he knows more than he is letting on. Which is not surprising as the NFL doesn’t want the world to know how many games were actually played with PSI levels below 12.5.

  5. mythbusters certainly have the technology to do it . . . lol . . . its a simple pressure sensor . . . that has been around for many many years already.

  6. There has to be some reason the NFL doesn’t want those numbers released but I can’t imagine what that might be….

    Florio, thanks for at least trying again. I am really not sure why the media hasn’t banded together and demanded this, but I also have no clue as to how much power or cohesion you guys might have.

    This seems to be one of those things that all reporters, regardless of what side they fall on, should be pursuing because of well, actual integrity.

  7. We really were focusing on the chain of custody and the protocol and who had access to the footballs and how they were getting from point A to point B before the game.

    You mean like when the refs left the balls to be used in a Patriots game (of all places) at the hotel??? #integrity

  8. He’s probably “resting” on semantics. Is the technology available to measure the pressure with an electronic device? Of course. The other part though is to make the data available in real time to the officials. That would be a whole other level of complexity. Having said that though the real issue is whether the NFL really wants air pressure data regardless of how it is obtained or in what time frame to become public information. I think we already know what the answer to that one is.

  9. Guys lets be honest…

    With an air tight system of having a handful of Sports Authority air gauges (each giving drastically different results) that no one keeps track of, crackerjack officials that don’t record starting PSI levels even when you tell them you need it for a sting operation, and a $5 million a pop series of tests to fill in the gaps for the science you didn’t do…. Why do we even need any more PSI technology?

  10. trailerparkking says:
    Jul 19, 2016 11:29 AM

    The reason it wasn’t submitted was because the NFL wasn’t going to engage in Kraft’s plausible deniability. Maybe had he handled himself with a little class this who thing could have been avoided. Regardless his “scientific fact” was based on assumptions of what the starting PSI levels were because they were never recorded. At best the Pats had an estimate which isn’t a fact because it’s based on assumptions.
    ———–

    at best Wells had an estimate too…..the field temperature that he had Exponent use in their calculations, as noted in the Wells report, was measured at Gillette Stadium’s weather station, which by the way is at the top of the lighthouse. so it was an assumption of what the field temperature was.

    but that still has no correlation to what the wet-ball temperature was. the temperature of the rain, soaking the balls, could have been lower. We had hail here in NH a few days ago….in July on a day that was over 90 degrees.

    my point is, without knowing the temperature of each and every ball, Exponent’s calculations were based on speculative data and therefore the results are speculative. However Exponent then went and used those speculative results to ‘confirm’ what Wells told Exponent: to assume that the gauge used was not the one Walt said he used. It’s all in the Wells report…..some of it scattered about…..but it’s there, and you can connect the dots if you care to look.

  11. “The other part though is to make the data available in real time to the officials. That would be a whole other level of complexity.”

    Not really. All that would require is a simple transmitter sending the data to a laptop or tablet set up with software to receive and read the data.

    Such applications already exist and would be inexpensive to have coded from scratch if need be.

  12. The disagreement could be a matter of semantics. Yes, technology exists to monitor air pressure in tires. But that doesn’t mean anyone has developed a device that would monitor air pressure inside a football in real time — and ideally alert game officials to a situation where the football is below 12.5 PSI or above 13.5 PSI.

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    The problem isn’t the technology to monitor it in real time. The problem is that they still haven’t figured out how to link it up to PayPal to fine the Patriots every time a ball drops below the specified limit yet.

  13. Despite the constant lies and contradictions coming from the NFL throughout the entire deflategate saga and the changes to protocol last season, 90% of the country still believes Goodell and the NFL over Brady. One “deflator” text and one “destroyed” cell phone is really all you guys need to ignore mountains of evidence against their claims?

  14. steelerben says:
    Jul 19, 2016 12:06 PM

    The problem isn’t the technology to monitor it in real time. The problem is that they still haven’t figured out how to link it up to PayPal to fine the Patriots every time a ball drops below the specified limit yet.

    ——

    As a Patriots fan, I for one can appreciate some originality.

    But really…..I heard the Blandino interview…..there was some major avoidance of the questions he was asked.

    And I ask: Why?

  15. The reason it wasn’t submitted was because the NFL wasn’t going to engage in Kraft’s plausible deniability. Maybe had he handled himself with a little class this who thing could have been avoided. Regardless his “scientific fact” was based on assumptions of what the starting PSI levels were because they were never recorded. At best the Pats had an estimate which isn’t a fact because it’s based on assumptions.

    ————————————————————–
    If you were accused of something you didn’t do and knew that false information had been leaked by the people accusing you, how classy would you be? Did you read the emails from the pats to the league, begging them to correct the false psi #’s that ESPN had reported?

    The assumptions you mention came from the league. They said the balls were measured pre game at 12.5 psi. We all know the temperature and time of exposure. Every reputable scientist has said the psi was right where the laws of nature said they should be.

    There is way more evidence of innocence than guilt, but I guess doesn’t really matter know.

  16. I agree with the poster about the exponent nbes being bogus too. The science on both sides is worthless so it’s important to stick with the facts and timeline of events, those are the only thing that should be in consideration.

  17. “Yes, technology exists to monitor air pressure in tires.”

    Sure. Your choices of monitoring are bulky (with respect to the size of a football) sensors that get strapped to the wheel, or reading data from the ABS sensor for the wheel. Neither of which would be great choices for sticking in a football.

  18. Why use consistent, independent, verifiable technology when we can continue to use 50 cent air gauges from China that have to be interpreted by people without 8th grade science educations, and then mysteriously lost when it comes time to double check them?

  19. Remember, this is the same group that had concussion information and didn’t reveal it, so you know they aren’t going to let you know what they know about the air in footballs.

  20. trailerparkking says:
    Jul 19, 2016 11:29 AM
    Regardless his “scientific fact” was based on assumptions of what the starting PSI levels were because they were never recorded. At best the Pats had an estimate which isn’t a fact because it’s based on assumptions.
    __________________

    Now there’s a classic example of telling the truth from a particular point of view. All the league had was the same estimates from the same source. Strange how they accepted some of Walt Anderson’s recollections and not others and you seem to be doing the same. I understand that from a Steelers fan perspective you need to believe the league is somehow trustworthy when it comes to this one thing so you can feel like you are not just a resentful Pats hater in wanting to see them done injury. That doesn’t change the fact that nothing the league has given as justification in either the Wells report or Goodell’s arbitration decision stands up to serious scrutiny.
    The 2nd Circuit’s majority opinion upholds Goodell’s right under the CBA to conduct a biased hearing and punish as he sees fit, it does not validate any of the bs he based it on. In fact very much the opposite. The league painted itself into a corner on this and for a variety of well known reasons had to pursue it’s case through to a W to uphold the power of the commissioner’s office. This was all about the CBA, it had nothing to do with PSI. After looking at the documentation available anyone telling themselves differently is lying to the man in the mirror.

    As your arguments have been defeated along the way you have gone from Belichick being a cheater to Brady being a liar to Kraft being a fraud. Why not just admit you hate them because they own the Steelers or failing that simply stop posting unsupportable statements?

  21. trailerparkking says:
    Jul 19, 2016 11:29 AM

    The reason it wasn’t submitted was because the NFL wasn’t going to engage in Kraft’s plausible deniability. Maybe had he handled himself with a little class this who thing could have been avoided. Regardless his “scientific fact” was based on assumptions of what the starting PSI levels were because they were never recorded. At best the Pats had an estimate which isn’t a fact because it’s based on assumptions.
    ————

    So, because the starting PSI levels were assumptions, the Pats can’t challenge the conclusions despite those assumptions coming from the NFL and the NFL basing their conclusions on those assumptions. But, the NFL conclusions were solid.

    Did I get that right?

  22. I might have been more impressed with Blandino’s answer had he said something like:

    “since the league supplies the K balls right before the game and the balls are prepared by each team in the officials’ locker room, there is no significant loss in the chain of custody of the balls. however the QBs like to have the balls they use on offense prepared a certain way, and from all accounts that preparation takes a lot of time. so there would be a chain of custody issue with those balls. since this will be our first attempt at using chips in balls, this is where we decided to start”

    instead he tried avoiding the question – his usual MO.

  23. How is calling Belicheat’s a cheater unsupportable?
    He’s been busted and after the spygate ruling was told he’d be banned for life if he was ever caught again. Him being a cheater isn’t debatable because the facts show he is. Why don’t you accept reality?

  24. As for Kraft being a fraud, what kind of a person parades around flaunting his team’s “titles” when they were won during the biggest cheating scandal in NFL history and was blatantly covered up?

  25. trailerparkking says:
    Jul 19, 2016 11:29 AM

    The reason it wasn’t submitted was because the NFL wasn’t going to engage in Kraft’s plausible deniability. Maybe had he handled himself with a little class this who thing could have been avoided. Regardless his “scientific fact” was based on assumptions of what the starting PSI levels were because they were never recorded. At best the Pats had an estimate which isn’t a fact because it’s based on assumptions.
    ————————–

    Not knowing the starting PSI levels sure didn’t stop the league from perpetrating a fraud.

    I find it hard to understand how you can assume that a guy deflated footballs when you don’t even know where the footballs started at.

  26. rolf1015 says:
    Jul 19, 2016 11:30 AM

    Wait a minute – from his SiriusXM interview in Feb 2016:

    “We did spot checks throughout the year, and we measured PSI levels and recorded that information,” Blandino said, per The Boston Globe. “So right now, we’re evaluating the information. We didn’t have any violations this year, but again we’re still in that evaluation phase to look at the information and then we’ll see what that tells us.”

    He says right now “we’re evaluating the information”. Maybe he is not including himself in “we”, but sounds like he knows more than he is letting on. Which is not surprising as the NFL doesn’t want the world to know how many games were actually played with PSI levels below 12.5.
    ————————–

    Pope Roger already came out and said Blandino wasn’t on scripture.

  27. In the 96 year history of the NFL nobody ever gave a damn about in game PSI levels before and were it not for a punishment supposedly based on it no one would care now. The whole thing is patently ridiculous.
    And yes @sonhoodoo you did summarize that convoluted ‘logic’ correctly, as implausible as it seems that someone could post something that disingenuous and not see for themselves how laughable it is.

  28. trailerparkking says:
    Jul 19, 2016 12:51 PM

    As for Kraft being a fraud, what kind of a person parades around flaunting his team’s “titles” when they were won during the biggest cheating scandal in NFL history and was blatantly covered up?
    ——

    the Patriots get caught filming from a restricted location in the first quarter of the first game after receiving Goodell’s memo and that constitutes “the biggest cheating scandal in NFL history”?

    And that doesn’t even factor in that filming the opponent’s sideline was and is still in fact allowed, just not from that location?

    the punishment wasn’t so much for the violation of the location rule as it was for blatantly ignoring Goodell’s memo.

    Please, get the starting point right, otherwise there isn’t really a debate to have.

  29. trailerparkking says:
    Jul 19, 2016 12:47 PM
    How is calling Belicheat’s a cheater unsupportable?
    He’s been busted and after the spygate ruling was told he’d be banned for life if he was ever caught again. Him being a cheater isn’t debatable because the facts show he is. Why don’t you accept reality?
    _______________________

    Again with the pretzel logic, the original statement was in regards to deflategate. The league absolved Belichick so the haters had to move on. You moved on to Brady, your infamous ‘loo

  30. trailerparkking says:
    Jul 19, 2016 11:29 AM
    The reason it wasn’t submitted was because the NFL wasn’t going to engage in Kraft’s plausible deniability. Maybe had he handled himself with a little class this who thing could have been avoided. Regardless his “scientific fact” was based on assumptions of what the starting PSI levels were because they were never recorded. At best the Pats had an estimate which isn’t a fact because it’s based on assumptions.
    ==============================
    Sheesh. Have you been paying attention at all? The league office made those assumptions. It’s the very basis of the fabricated Wells report. There’s very little doubt at this point that science proves unnatural ball deflation. It’s silly to even try to defend it at this point.

  31. trailerparkking says:
    Jul 19, 2016 12:47 PM

    How is calling Belicheat’s a cheater unsupportable?
    He’s been busted and after the spygate ruling was told he’d be banned for life if he was ever caught again. Him being a cheater isn’t debatable because the facts show he is. Why don’t you accept reality?
    ——————————

    The guy misinterpreted a memo. Seems kind of draconian to ban a guy for life for breaking another rule.

    Oh , that’s right, he was never told that.

  32. okay, I know what TPK is talking about, since Belichick was taping signals those first 3 SBs were tainted.

    for example:

    Pats Beat Eagles in 2004 SB 24-21

    previous games between them during Belichick Era

    2004 last game of preseason – Patriots won 24-6
    2003 regular season – Patriots won 31-10
    2003 preseason – Patriots won 24-12
    2002 preseason – Patriots won 16-15

    so the argument is that the Patriots won the Super Bowl because the Patriots illegally taped signals from 3 preseason games and one regular season thrashing of the Eagles over a year earlier……which of course would have to assume that the Eagles didn’t change their signals?

    Pretty solid argument

  33. jag1959 says:
    Jul 19, 2016 1:04 PM
    trailerparkking says:
    Jul 19, 2016 12:47 PM
    How is calling Belicheat’s a cheater unsupportable?
    He’s been busted and after the spygate ruling was told he’d be banned for life if he was ever caught again. Him being a cheater isn’t debatable because the facts show he is. Why don’t you accept reality?
    _______________________

    Again with the pretzel logic, the original statement was in regards to deflategate. The league absolved Belichick so the haters had to move on. From there you moved on to Brady, your hilarious ‘looked in my heart…liars’ post lives on in infamy. Once the multiple lies of Goodell came to light but not one verifiable lie from Brady could be found you have now centered on Kraft. There is no salvaging your credibility in this. Being a Giants guy I have no skin in the game when it comes to AFC rivalries but it is obvious your inherent dislike of a rival that dominates your team has overcome the good sense you have shown on other issues.

  34. actually, the 2003 SB might provide better proof:

    Patriots beat the Panthers 32-29

    Games between the 2 teams during Belichick Era:

    2002 Preseason Patriots won 23-3
    2001 Regular season Patriots won 38-6
    2001 preseason Patriots won 23-8
    2000 preseason Patriots won 29-21

    so, from which of those games (3 preseason and one regular season stomping) did the Patriots get illegally taped signals that helped them win the SB? be careful……after that 38-6 regular season beatdown by the Patriots in 2001, the Panthers fired their head coach.

    Which leaves 2 arguments:
    1. Panthers used the same signals from a preseason game (the previous year) in the SB, or
    2. Panthers used the same signals as the previous coaching staff did, regardless of getting totally trashed on the field

  35. trailerparkking says:
    Jul 19, 2016 11:29 AM

    The reason it wasn’t submitted was because the NFL wasn’t going to engage in Kraft’s plausible deniability. Maybe had he handled himself with a little class this who thing could have been avoided. Regardless his “scientific fact” was based on assumptions of what the starting PSI levels were because they were never recorded. At best the Pats had an estimate which isn’t a fact because it’s based on assumptions.
    ————————–

    Not knowing the starting PSI levels sure didn’t stop the league from perpetrating a fraud.

    I find it hard to understand how you can assume that a guy deflated footballs when you don’t even know where the footballs started at.

    ****************************************

    we are now dragging around the carcass that was one known as Trailerparkking.

    Figures, he’s a Pittsburgh fan.
    You can close down your machine now Trailer, you’ve been exposed

  36. trailerparkking says:
    Jul 19, 2016 12:47 PM
    How is calling Belicheat’s a cheater unsupportable?
    He’s been busted and after the spygate ruling was told he’d be banned for life if he was ever caught again. Him being a cheater isn’t debatable because the facts show he is.
    ___________________________
    Did you say “facts”? Spygate was about filming coaches signals during a game from an “unauthorized location” in the stadium. So you really see that as more of a violation than the numerous PED and salary cap violations that many other teams and players have been fined for? Is it debatable that every team cheats?

  37. mmack66 says:
    Jul 19, 2016 12:53 PM

    I find it hard to understand how you can assume that a guy deflated footballs when you don’t even know where the footballs started at

    ——

    that’s because they conveniently believe Walt when he said they were all at 12.5 or made to be at 12.5, and conveniently don’t believe him when he said he used the logo gauge to take those measurements that they believe he made.

  38. Trailerparkking,

    Could you please provide the source for your comment that “after Spygate , Belichick was told that he would be suspended for life if he was caught again” Thank you for all your insights.

  39. Call Bridgestone or Goodyear or Michelin. The system is available and used daily The Direct TPM has a chip in the tire and will give you exact pressure. Do not need a bulky system to monitor it. You just have to be within 20 feet of the chip to read it’s data.

    Second. Every new tire produced comes with an RFID chip embedded in it The tire can be monitored remotely again, within 20’feer nmanifacturers is the data for various reasons.

    It’s there, it’s a available but I don’t think think it’s a big deal to drop that kind of money on something that could be measured with any decent pressure gauge

  40. Nor should they….it’s stupid!

    Perspective: over 100 years of football and only now it’s an issue? If it has not come up before now, PSI is a non issue; stop making it one. LOL!

  41. How is this not a bigger deal???

    “We did spot checks throughout the year, and we measured PSI levels and recorded that information,” Blandino said, per The Boston Globe. “So right now, we’re evaluating the information. We didn’t have any violations this year, but again we’re still in that evaluation phase to look at the information and then we’ll see what that tells us.”

    Then when the actual numbers don’t fit their narrative they say they’ve only focused on the chain of custody and not the PSI??

    This is bananaland!

    Berman exonerated Brady based on the lack of evidence from the Wells Report and NFL counsel. Then the NFL appeals it and argues their powers under the CBA. The Appellate Court agreed with the CBA. There was no opinion on the act or punishment, only on the powers granted to Goodell. And yet the haters will continue to call the greatest QB of all time a cheat.

  42. abninf says:
    Jul 19, 2016 1:22 PM

    So The Deflator may not need to find a new career yet.
    —-

    he’s a beer distributor and has been for a long time.

    why would anyone who is a beer distributor want a new career?

  43. All cheatriot nation provides are lies and cries.
    Enjoy the tainted legacy!

    ———————————————-

    Remember all those titles the pats won in the 70’s while jacked up on steroids? Remember when the pats team dr got busted in an hgh scandal? Remember when the pats coach tripped the guy returning a kick for a touchdown?

    Oh yeah, that was the steelers. Sorry for any confusion.

  44. trailerparkking says:
    Jul 19, 2016 1:33 PM
    All cheatriot nation provides are lies and cries.
    Enjoy the tainted legacy!
    ==========================

    ‘When the argument is lost, slander becomes the tool o the loser.’

  45. trailerparkking says:
    Jul 19, 2016 1:33 PM
    All cheatriot nation provides are lies and cries.
    Enjoy the tainted legacy!
    _______________________
    So that’s the best you can do? No response to the other questions? I thought you would at least have a few “facts” to try and substantiate your claims – guess “lies and cries” are all you have…

  46. The important question in all of this is why do they even have to be within a certain range? That made sense when both teams used the same balls but now each team provides their own footballs. Let them have them at the psi they want. Other team may handle it on a turnover but so what – not a big enough reason to limit the range and have to worry about being in compliance

  47. A tire pressure sensor is pretty bulky. It certainly can’t be adapted to a football.

    You people do know that it is more than just a chip, don’t you?

  48. quickbooks12 says:
    Jul 19, 2016 1:53 PM
    Berman exonerated Brady based on the lack of evidence from the Wells Report and NFL counsel. Then the NFL appeals it and argues their powers under the CBA. The Appellate Court agreed with the CBA. There was no opinion on the act or punishment, only on the powers granted to Goodell. And yet the haters will continue to call the greatest QB of all time a cheat.
    _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
    I kind of get your point here but I don’t believe Berman exonerated anyone. Hid did say the commissioner over stepped his bounds. But he never offered an opinion (let alone a judgement) on Brady’s innocence or guilt.

  49. john6v54 says:
    Jul 19, 2016 4:09 PM

    The important question in all of this is why do they even have to be within a certain range?
    —————————

    Given the time and money wasted on Psigate, you might suppose that it is the result of an exhaustive study by the NFL Ministry of Science, who concluded that that particular range of air pressures affords an equal advantage to both teams.

    Nope, it’s because Wilson put it on the ball and on the box that the ball comes in.

    Yep, that’s the only reason it exists.

    And it only matters if a football falls below 12.5PSI. Anything above 13.5PSI is a-okay.

    Oh, and it only applies to footballs used by the New England Patriots.

  50. More lies from the most dispicable entities to exist in modern business. No lie is to small to tell and no person is to small to step on. Goodell has built a bigger fraud than the WWE. congratulations.

  51. rolf1015 says:
    Jul 19, 2016 3:40 PM
    trailerparkking says:
    Jul 19, 2016 1:33 PM
    All cheatriot nation provides are lies and cries.
    Enjoy the tainted legacy!
    _______________________
    So that’s the best you can do? No response to the other questions? I thought you would at least have a few “facts” to try and substantiate your claims – guess “lies and cries” are all you have…
    ———————————————————————
    Rolf, go easy on the little guy, you can tell he’s about 13 years old, and it’s tough for him to come up with the “big” words like the adults use!

  52. I’m sure with all the money the league has and how important integrity of the game is, the only reason this won’t happen is because it will prove the innocence of Tom Brady. They won’t approve of such technology until they can manipulate the data.

  53. Will you Pat fans just stop with the Gas Law excuse lmao

    You do not have an equation that proves Brady’s innocent, just like the NFL doesn’t have it to disprove it….

    Things nobody has:
    -Actual temperature of locker room when inflating
    -Actual PSI balls were initially set at
    -Actual temperature of locker room at halftime

  54. Make Brady and the Pat’s organization pay for developing the technology. They’re the team that were gifted a Super Bowl berth AFTER they were known to have cheated to get to the Super Bowl. Maybe the Pat’s whining fans will chip in a buck each.

  55. crazieates says:
    Jul 20, 2016 11:36 AM

    Will you Pat fans just stop with the Gas Law excuse lmao

    You do not have an equation that proves Brady’s innocent, just like the NFL doesn’t have it to disprove it….

    Things nobody has:
    -Actual temperature of locker room when inflating
    -Actual PSI balls were initially set at
    -Actual temperature of locker room at halftime
    —————————–

    Lol. Thanks for confirming that the league was conducting a witch hunt. The lack of any one of those things should have put an end to the whole charade, yet the NFL went ahead anyway.

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