Hall of Fame Non-Game lawsuit coming this week

AP

Three days removed from the Hall of Fame Non-Game, the first lawsuit arising from the debacle is less than three days away.

Lawyer Michael Avenatti, who filed suit five years ago as a result of the Super Bowl XLV tickets-but-no-seats fiasco, said on Wednesday’s PFT Live on NBC Sports Radio that litigation will be pursued by Friday.

The specific venue for the initiation of the process and the legal theories to be pursued have not been finalized. It’s possible, Avenatti explained, that tort-type claims could be included, based on the alleged negligence that caused the game to not be played. Typically, tort claims unlock a broader range of available compensation than claims based on alleged breaches of contract. Depending on the level of misconduct, tort claims also raise the possibility of punitive damages.

While the Super Bowl XLV case ultimately had roughly 150 plaintiffs, Avenatti said that his latest assault on the NFL could include every fan who made the trip to the stadium in Canton, no matter how long or far they came. That could result in more than 22,000 claims.

For now, neither the NFL nor the Hall of Fame have indicated a willingness to offer more than a refund of ticket prices. This could change, once the lawsuit is filed. Alternatively, the NFL could choose to hunker down and fight.

Fighting won’t be cheap. Avenatti said on PFT Live that the league has spent $20 million defending against the Super Bowl XLV cases. That $20 million could have been used to settle those cases, several times over. For the new case, it remains to be season whether the league’s lawyers will be enriched, whether its customers will be financially made whole, or both.

61 responses to “Hall of Fame Non-Game lawsuit coming this week

  1. it remains to be season whether the league’s lawyers will be enriched

    wish there was the same level of proofreading as there is in eliminating posts.

  2. For now, neither the NFL nor the Hall of Fame have indicated a willingness to offer more than a refund of ticket prices.
    ________

    This is all they SHOULD offer. They didn’t make anyone travel, pay for any hotel, gas, flight, etc.

    All the NFL offered was entry to a game. That didn’t happen, so they are providing full refunds for the game tickets.

  3. This could be doubly valuable to the lawyers if they convince their clients to take their portion of a settlement in Packers stock.

  4. LOL… Only in America. My heart bleeds for those that have more money than brains to pay for a trip to the hall of fame game. We’ll pray for you that you make it though these difficult times. Stay strong.

  5. Fine the NFL 1 Million, suspend (without pay) Goodell for the rest of the year.

    Also, any additional penalties my fellow posters add to the pile…

    Amen…

    PS: these penalties are NOT subject to arbitration.

  6. Even my diminished math skills put the NFL’s legal bill for the SB XLV seat blunder at $133k per plaintiff. If he can’t come to a gracious & reasonable compromise w/ the HOF game ticketholders, Goodell’s buffoonery must end w/ him being shown the door.

  7. The reason the NFL fights is pretty simple. If they settle and pay out anything beyond the game ticket, it sets a precedent for future situations. Once that box is open, no amount of duct tape and Gorilla Glue will re-seal it. Last thing the league wants is some guy saying “I took a week off to come to this game, but my pay stubs show my job was really busy and I would have had 10 hours of overtime that week instead of just the 40 hours vacation pay, so I want that OT as well.”

  8. Avenatti said that his latest assault on the NFL could include every fan who made the trip to the stadium in Canton, no matter how long or far they came
    ~~~~~~
    This is why people can’t stand some lawyers. Why should anyone who lives in the local area be compensated more than the ticket cost? Even those that made the trip shouldn’t get any more than the ticket cost and MAYBE one night hotel cost.

  9. “…the Super Bowl XLV case ultimately had roughly 150 plaintiffs…Avenatti said on PFT Live that the league has spent $20 million defending against the Super Bowl XLV cases.”

    And that was an open-and-shut case – there were 150 people with real tickets and no seats to sit on. I’m sure that, when confronted with this, if the league had offered those 150 people a check for $5,000 in exchange for a promise to not pursue any further litigation, they would have been fine with that. There would have been other associated costs for the league, but for about $1 million, the issue would have been closed. Instead they have spent $20 million. God only knows how much they’ll overspend defending this game and its associated stupidity.

    And they’ll still come out ahead financially. The 32 owners will all enter into a “gentleman’s agreement” to raise ticket prices 10% and tell the fans it is due to an overall increase in the general cost of doing business. And we the fans, like the dumb sheep we are, will gripe a little and then pay the higher costs because we can’t live without the NFL. And they know that. No wonder all 32 of them have an 11-figure net worth.

  10. Complete insanity here, the main event of the weekend was the induction ceremony, not a meaningless exhibition game with wannabe NFL players.
    Sorry Cheeseheads i realize there is nothing else to do where you live but this game meant nothing, it was not supposed to be an investment.

  11. I hope the NFL gets nailed.

    The right thing is to tell people to submit copies of receipts for their hotel bills, travel expenses, etc., and then pay.

    Will the NFL do this?

    No.

    Will they pay in the end?

    Yes.

  12. Some of these greedy lie-yers are making $60 an hour, so guess who wins. Stupid NFL always crapping on fans. Greed is the keyword.

  13. Don’t forget to include the legions of Favre-worshiping Vikings fans that made the trip……both of them.

  14. Just stop to think about the precedent being set. A concert with 80,000 ticket holders gets cancelled because the featured performer is sick.
    So now, 80,000 people sue for airline tickets, hotels, meals, liquor, lost wages, drugs………

  15. Pendulum swings both ways, folks. Goodell wants the authority to discipline at will and under any circumstance for the “Integrity of the Shield”, he has to abide by same rules. They hired someone last year, specifically to ensure that the venue is ready for use intended use. That is tacit recognition that the NFL has a responsibility to provide entertainment as promised under any condition under their control. They failed to do so. And not only that, delayed notifying customers until long after the decision to cancel had already been made.
    Sure they will try and blame the subcontractor. But the fact of the matter is that the specific expertise associated with the cause for the game being cancelled lies within the NFL. They failed, once again, to do what they are responsible for doing. They should pay and will pay through the nose.

  16. “Avenatti said on PFT Live that the league has spent $20 million defending against the Super Bowl XLV cases. That $20 million could have been used to settle those cases, several times over.”

    The stupidity, corruption and arrogance of vile Goodell and his cronies is the real problem.

    20 million to defend a case that could have made all 150 people ecstatic with the settlement they would have gotten if the league had just dumped a single million in their collective laps.

    Goodell and the rest of the swine just can’t admit they’re wrong. No matter how clearly wrong it was to sell tickets to non-existent seats, the will never say they did anything but a wonderfully good job.

  17. Don’t believe the $20 million story. At $400 an hour that would be 50,000 hours of attorney work which would equate to 5 attorneys working 40 hours a week for 5 years.

    Additionally, in-house attorneys get a paycheck whether they are working on leases or defending a suit over seating for the Super Bowl.

  18. For those who think it should be “ticket cost only”, this wasn’t an act-of-God, this was negligence on the part of the NFL. That’s really not in question.

    When you add in that not only were concessions open and selling as if the game was to take place, but that the “official” announcement was broadcast to the world 15 minutes before they told anyone in the stands (after the official game start time)…it’s more than a simple oversight.

    In comparison, the NFL offered triple the face value for the Dallas Superbowl seats that weren’t completed in time for the game. The HoF folks are offering the gracious amount of FACE value.

  19. At first thought cost of tickets, air fare for those who flew in and hotel cost was sufficient…on second thought punitive damages because the NFL opened the gates to a stadium that wasn’t having a football game and made a lot of money selling hamburgers, hot dogs, beer and souvenirs off of people knowing the game was going to be cancelled. So the sale of these and other items will help offset the cost of the refunds.

  20. This isn’t about the game being cancelled the suit will be based on knowing the game would be cancelled hours before but still allowing patrons to come in and purchase food, drink, etc.

    They really should have just refunded the ticket money and offered a gift card to the NFL shop. Goodwill generated and slip in a waiver of any future claims.

  21. Does this happen for other venues as well? People travel for things all the time. If I travel to Disney World and the park is unexpectedly closed, do I sue them for my airfare and hotel ticket?

    One year I went to New York and the Statue of Liberty was not offering tours. Should I have sued then? If your answer is yes, I missed out on a huge opportunity.

  22. 2016StockMarketCrash says:
    Aug 10, 2016 11:47 AM
    Complete insanity here, the main event of the weekend was the induction ceremony, not a meaningless exhibition game with wannabe NFL players.
    Sorry Cheeseheads i realize there is nothing else to do where you live but this game meant nothing, it was not supposed to be an investment.

    —————–

    Sure….sure….but do the Colts still get to hoist a HoF game participation banner?

  23. The fans at the stadium received invaluable interactions (not to mention autographs and pictures) with the HOF Class of 2016 instead of a meaningless football game played by soon-to-be-cut players.

    Sounds like the NFL should pay out the a** for that.

  24. The only thing more stupid than going to the Hall of Fame game is suing the NFL for not having the Hall of Fame game. Besides the Packer and Colts dweebs there, does anyone even really give rats be-hind about this?

  25. NFL owners are sick with greed. Sometimes I think we fans are sicker because we continue to willfully stuff our money into their pockets. If the league is going to take this attitude then you all should blow off going to or watching the HOF game next year. But what are the chances of people getting together to make that happen? Zero.

  26. 1st World problems…….

    These people spent hundreds (if not thousands) of dollars to travel to Buttfreak Ohio to watch a game that was gonna be on Basic Cable TV. They would’ve gotten hosed even if the game had taken place.

  27. “If you spend $20m settling over defending then even more lawsuits will follow”

    Incorrect. A reasonable business evaluates each claim according to it’s individual merit. Settling claims that should be settled is just good business.

  28. I do not think the NFL should reimburse for every expense, but some stipend beyond ticket price is absolutely appropriate.

    The posters who’ve cited “precedent” are missing apples vs oranges… This was NOT weather related, an “act of God”, a lead singer getting sick, or any other basic event accident. It was an elective *choice* by the NFL based 100% on their own negligence in field prep, with zero warning to fans already at the stadium – many of whom traveled from outside the region. Any precedent set would be very narrow.

  29. I’m all for screwing over the NFL as they have done to fans over the years. However, this situation, while bad, smells of greed by the lawyer, especially since it’s the same one from the Super Bowl mess at Jerry’s World.

    The NFL spent over $20 million fighting that because they didn’t want to set a precedent in giving fans millions for similar ticket fiascos. They are like the Scientologists. They will lawyer you into submission

  30. Simple solution:

    Everyone gets assigned a paint by numbers class.

    or Painting with a Twist (the twist being a copy of the NFL rule guide).

    or a hefty contribution to a painting education and landscape mgmt. program…

  31. It’s much better PR if they offer something beyond the ticket costs but the NFL isn’t really known for being PR savvy these days, now are they?

    From a legal standpoint you could argue in-stadium purchases maybe but plane tickets and lodging have basically no shot. A settlement is these people’s best hope.

  32. I doubt a tort claim makes it very far. Economic loss rule and foreseeability issues will make it difficult. These are probably the issues that the plaintiff’s attorney is trying to overcome.

  33. League meeting:

    “We could pay off these 22,000 fans with $200 each, equalling 4.4 million, which is a pretty cheap price to pay for our gross negligence. Or….. we could fight tooth & nail and run up 20 million in lawyer fees. ”

    Roger: “Somehow science is to blame. The laws of physics don’t apply here at 345 Park Ave. congealing paint, gas laws, who knew this job would be so difficult, compared to my previous job as a NY Jet intern. Fight it!! Cut Ted Wells a cheque to find out who was generally aware that paint congeals. 20 million should do it.”

  34. I was there. I travelled from California to be there for the weekend. It would have been nice to have a game, but I honestly don’t care that I missed seeing Joe Callahan start at QB or any other dozens of players whose names I won’t remember after they’re cut in a few weeks. To me, and to most everyone else in attendance, the weekend wasn’t about the game. This lawsuit will be a hard sell, and the only way anyone will probably see any money out of it is if the NFL pays just to make it go away. And even then, it won’t be that much.

    If I make any money off this weekend, I want it to come from Delta, for making me spend 24 hours in three different airports on the way home.

  35. Once again the NFL failed a science test. They don’t know how long it takes paint to dry. I’m beginning to think our education system is a failure.

  36. The NFL should refund flight, hotel and ticket expenses, at the very least.

    It’s like being invited to Nebraska for a marriage.

    You pay for the flight, hotel, food, present, tux, dresses, renta car not to mention maybe use vacation time only to show up and the wedding is moved to Florida.

    The ONLY reason you spent all that $ was for the wedding (what the hell else is in Nebraska?). The fans should get reimbursed.

    Now, if it’s just some local yokel who ambled down 30 mins away, then just the ticket.

    Seems only fair.

  37. Quit a “commissioner” the NFL has there. Not qualified to be an arbitrator, couldn’t see the HoF game/ field thing coming, never saw the Ray Rice video, lost some of the concussion case files…

    We’ll probably start seeing some more spin doctored press releases about the HoF game now. This is the only way Goodell knows how to “fix” problems. A never ending demonstration of what the word “integrity” means to the NFL.

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