Clemson buys $5 million insurance policies for Deshaun Watson

AP

Clemson quarterback Deshaun Watson is viewed by some as the top prospect for the 2017 NFL draft. If an injury changes that, he’s financially protected.

Clemson has paid for a pair of $5 million insurance policies for Watson, ESPN reports. One of the policies would pay out of Watson suffered a career-ending injury, while the other policy would pay Watson if an injury forces his draft stock to plunge.

“It gives me peace of mind,” Watson told ESPN.

Several college players have bought insurance policies to protect them in such situations, although those policies typically pay far less than a player loses when he suffers a serious injury. Cowboys second-round pick Jaylon Smith, for instance, will reportedly collect $900,000 on his injury policy. The severe injury he suffered in the Fiesta Bowl this year, however, likely cost him nearly $20 million on his rookie contract. And Jaguars second-round pick Myles Jack, who also dropped in the draft because of a knee injury, did not collect anything from his injury policy because it would only make a payment if he fell below the 45th overall pick, and Jack went 36th.

So while an injury policy is a good thing for Watson to have, a much better thing to have will be a healthy 2016 season.

15 responses to “Clemson buys $5 million insurance policies for Deshaun Watson

  1. Good luck collecting on any of those in case the unfortunate happens. They have well-paid lawyers who are very experienced in finding ways to weasel out of paying.

  2. He’s going to be another Terrell Pryor, elite athlete, not a very good pro QB.

    College offenses are doing a poor job of setting these kids up for success at the next level. Some of these kids don’t even know how to call a play in the huddle (Goff).

  3. And yet we wonder why college tuition is so high. Clemson and other public universities should not use taxpayer money or tuition fees to supplement their football program.
    If I were seeking a engineer degree and were disabled from a car accident should I expect Clemson to have bought a insurance policy to cover my unexpected loss of future income?
    The NCAA should investigate.

  4. denrec says:
    Aug 17, 2016 4:46 PM

    And yet we wonder why college tuition is so high. Clemson and other public universities should not use taxpayer money or tuition fees to supplement their football program.
    If I were seeking a engineer degree and were disabled from a car accident should I expect Clemson to have bought a insurance policy to cover my unexpected loss of future income?
    The NCAA should investigate.
    ===============

    Actually major football programs are net positive cash flow — by a lot.

    I see no reason Clemson would be any different.

  5. Huh?
    Wait a second!
    Why isn’t this an NCAA violation?
    Because the University bought it?
    If a booster bought it for the player, the NCAA would try to shut down the football program.
    What’s the difference?

  6. Soooo basically the schools can’t give these guys basic stuff like team funded trips to a restaurant but they are allowed to buy insurance policies that give the student athlete 5 mil in the case an injury affects their draft stock. Got it. Makes zero sense.

  7. Why the surprise? This has been around since the early 90s and covers many sports, including women’s. It’s a disability policy.

    “This program will provide the student-athlete with the opportunity to protect against future loss of earnings as a professional athlete due to a disabling injury or sickness that may occur during the collegiate career.”

  8. In a roundabout way, isn’t this technically paying a college athlete for his services?

    Would he leave for the draft early if they didn’t pay for the policy coverage?

    Is there a Captain in here?

  9. There’s a difference between the player paying for the policy and the university paying for it.

  10. Wouldn’t this mean they would have to do it for everybody, including the woman’s volleyball team? How about the Golf team? Hmmmmmm

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