Baseball dreams accelerate endorsement realities for Tebow

AP

Tim Tebow claims that his desire to play baseball is “definitely not about money.” I wonder how much money he’d be making if it was about money.

As it stands, he’s making plenty of money as part of an effort that’s definitely not about money. Tebow has been selling signed baseballs and bats at $125 and $175 a pop, respectively. And now, ESPN co-worker Darren Rovell reports that Tebow has signed a multi-year deal with Adidas.

“Sources said there was always an active dialogue between Tebow and shoe and apparel companies,” Rovell writes. “His attempt to make it in baseball accelerated that timeline.”

In other words, Adidas and others had been talking to Tebow when he was a football player in permanent limbo. Once he became a budding baseball player, a deal got done. The first manifestation of it occurred on Tuesday, when Tebow became essentially an Adidas sandwich board, wearing the company’s gear from head to toe.

But Tebow’s baseball excursion definitely isn’t about money.

It’ll be interesting to see how else this not-about-the-money baseball endeavor results in money being paid to Tebow for things other than, you know, actually playing baseball.

35 responses to “Baseball dreams accelerate endorsement realities for Tebow

  1. Now that he has “committed” to baseball, please move him off the profootballtalk forums.

    The more we see his true colors, the more of a d-bag he appears to be. He can’t cut it in major league baseball any more than he could cut it in the NFL. But he is more than happy to sign endorsement deals, sell memorabilia, and run his hype train down our throats. And make no mistake about it, this is Timmy’s hype train. it isn’t the media any more, it isn’t religious groups…it’s all him. I actually believe him that it isn’t about the money. I think it is about the attention, the adoration, and the hero-worship he was used to as a college player. It is as much of a drug as HGH. Ask Brett Favre about it. He needs the spotlight, needs to stay relevant.

  2. It would be nice if you mentioned how much Tim Tebow donates to his various works and charities. Regardless of how much he makes to sign a baseball, if he gives away a good portion, it still may not be about the money.

  3. has mastered the art of talking out of both sides of his mouth…will be running for political office in the not too distant future where the real money is…

  4. Whenever someone says, “It’s not about the money,” it’s usually about the money.

  5. Doesn’t seem very Christian like the way Tebow is acting. Seems he is committing 3 of the 7 deadly sins……

    Greed (This one first and foremost. Says it’s not about money, but charging for signed baseballs and bats even though he has no baseball career, and already had endorsement deals in place. It seems that might have been his real motive to make it in football in the US and now baseball),

    Gluttony (This one kind of goes hand and hand with Greed)

    Pride (He’s been committing the Pride one for a while).

  6. Apparel companies don’t pay players to play.. they pay for brand exposure and Timmy is giving them plenty

  7. Gee, why is the sports media so hard on Tebow?

    (Because he’s insincere, sanctimonious, a little dim, has annoying fans…)

  8. If I could collect bags of money trying out for professional sports I’d do it in a flash. Beats the grind of everyday life…. more power to anyone who has the opportunity.

  9. Why attack his moves that will earn an income? It’s not like he turned his back on teammates and jumped to a different team, or a different sport, for a bump in pay. He is a professional athlete who hasn’t given up on his dream. I’m in the camp that would have recommended a position switch to stay in the NFL but he continues to stay in top shape and works every chance he gets.

  10. If Tebow really wants to play MLB, he should forget about fielding and throwing (to a certain extent) and just focus on hitting. If he could hit real pitching well, then you have a DH that could also pinch run.

  11. After he rides a bus in Single A for a month or two hitting about .120, this will be over.

  12. It is just amazing how many psychologists and theologians read and comment on PFT. Many even have god-like abilities to see into the heart of another person, but all seem to be capable of diagnosing faults and sins in the life a generous philanthropist they’ve never met.

    It’s even more surprising that his coaches and teammates and others who worked closely with him, while not always complimentary of his sports skills, seem to think he’s a high-character guy. I guess he’s just got them all fooled – but the gang here at PFT, we somehow know better.

  13. Why so much shade for Tebow?

    Look – there is nothing wrong with him making money. And to be fair, there are a number of things he could do which would pay him more money than baseball would. So, he is not solely making this decision based on money.

    (I will bet you if he was willing to play any position other than QB he would make a substantial amount of money – and the endorsements would be larger)

  14. All that baseball charade showed was that he’s a good athlete with strength. That’s it. He couldn’t even hit a changeup. Like Pedro Cerrano, the curveball had him badly fooled. Perhaps some minor league looking to increase ticket sales will sign him because that’s what Tebow has become. A sideshow gimmick to sell shoes, autographs, and tickets. It’s not about the money? Riiiiiiight.

  15. This was a way to make a quick buck and get exposure so he could make more money. That’s all it is, plain and simple. This will be borne out in the coming days when he refuses to play minor league baseball, believing he’s entitled to a shot on a MLB roster right away just like he’ll only play QB. After the hype machine dies down, he’ll be back on the SEC network per usual.

  16. usg1 says:
    Aug 31, 2016 9:01 AM

    Doesn’t seem very Christian like the way Tebow is acting. Seems he is committing 3 of the 7 deadly sins……

    ____________________________________

    He’s playing the hand he was dealt and earning a good living from it, that does not mean he is greedy. He’s giving to charities to make a difference in the world. Being rich and successful is not a sin. Tebow can do what he wants, it doesn’t impact me. So if companies want to pay him for endorsements, why is that a sin?

  17. “Enough. Just enough. Please.”

    And yet you read the article. And left a comment.

  18. What would some of you do without Tebow? He is one of the few people left you are allowed to hate.

  19. Aug 31, 2016 11:59 AM – packmanfan says: That is a lot of money for a signed bat or ball of a loser.
    Only in America.

    Loser? He’s worked to get a children’s hospital built, paid for playrooms in children’s cancer wards, sponsored banquets for developmentally disabled people, and funded wish fulfillment for terminally ill kids. What have you done with your life?

  20. “corkspop says:
    Aug 31, 2016 9:55 AM
    Why attack his moves that will earn an income? It’s not like he turned his back on teammates and jumped to a different team, or a different sport, for a bump in pay. He is a professional athlete who hasn’t given up on his dream. I’m in the camp that would have recommended a position switch to stay in the NFL but he continues to stay in top shape and works every chance he gets.”

    Sorry to disillusion you corkspop, but Tebow is NOT a professional athlete. He WAS a professional athlete, until his numerous employers (who made him a professional by, you know, paying him) decided he wasn’t good enough to play professionally.

    It’s impossible to reach a valid conclusion when you start with an invalid premise.

  21. People don’t like Tim Tebow because (1) He demanded to play QB in the NFL, and despite multiple teams offering him a job at another position, he refused. (2) He claims to morally superior (being a christian they know all), yet advocates against the rights of women as well as gay’s. (3) Nobody can can write a negative article about him because the fanatical pseudo-good guys will turn out in droves to defend their grid iron messiah claiming religious discrimination. (4) citing the bible, and scripture every time you have a camera pointed at you is pretentious. (5) Any athlete that charges for an autograph is a chump.

    PFT will probably strike this post because it criticizes the one thing americans aren’t mature, or rational enough to debate.

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Not a member? Register now!

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.