Alex Boone on concussions: “I know what’s going to happen to me someday”

AP

Alex Boone is a creature of habit, and has been wearing a helmet so old that it’s no longer even manufactured. But after missing a week with his first concussion, he’s changing to a newer, more protective model even if he doesn’t like it.

Becuase he knows what’s at stake is more important than his inconvenience.

This is a brutal game,” Boone said, via Chad Graff of the St. Paul Pioneer Press. “I’m at a position where you’re getting hit constantly in the head. It’s one of those things where I know what’s going to happen to me someday. I signed up for this a long time ago, and I love this game more than anything.

“I know what’s going to happen, but at the end of the day, if I can try to help myself be smarter and be better, then I will.”

Boone’s not excited about changing hats, but he also has a wife and daughter, and that was in his mind when he was being evaluated prior to last week. He said he thought he was well enough to play last week, but didn’t fight with the doctors when they told him he wasn’t cleared.

“And the testing was just obnoxious,” Boone said. “I mean, [geez]. Whoever made that testing is a real [jerk]. The ImPACT test, you’re sitting in front of a computer for 30 minutes answering questions. . . .

“It’s annoying, but I understand it. It’s a process. This is a brutal game. It is what it is. Sometimes you get hit in the head and things go wrong. I have kids and the last thing I want to do is have them take care of me [when I’m] 35. It’s hard because I want to play and I want to do everything, but I want to be a dad at the same time.”

And that was more than enough to make him change helmets, which seems like a small concession to make.

15 responses to “Alex Boone on concussions: “I know what’s going to happen to me someday”

  1. Sadly, helmets do little to prevent concussions. The issue is that when the body stops quickly, the arrestment of momentum causes the brain to impact the inside of the skull. Helmets are great for preventing external injuries and skull fracture….concussions or other types of brain injury? Not so much.

  2. These guys are killing themselves out there for our entertainment. Yet we constantly have idiots complaining about millionaire ballplayers.

    There was even a post at one time lamenting that players used to be “gladiators”. That is the attitude of some fans. To them the players are nothing more than pieces of meat.

  3. “And the testing was just obnoxious,” Boone said. “I mean, [geez]. Whoever made that testing is a real [jerk]. The ImPACT test, you’re sitting in front of a computer for 30 minutes answering questions. . . .
    ————-
    You know a lot of us do that all day, all week, all month, all year. We call it our job. We don’t like it either but it does pay the bills.

  4. Yes, you chose this life. If you dont want repeated blows to the head then be a teacher and make $35K/yr. Dont get paid millions to play a violent game then suee when you have long term damage. Even in the 70’s you had to have known this sport could leave you with long term effects. The second you step onto the field you are waiving your right to complain when you suffer long term effects. If you dont like it, then dont play and go make $30-$60k/yr in some office.

  5. Many NFL fans leave the house everyday and head to a job that’s full of inherent risks too. Whether it’s the construction industry, Military, Police, Fire, Factory workers or many other jobs, we run the risk of getting hurt or killed so we can collect a paycheck and support our families. We do it for a lot less than these NFL players do. We’re not unsympathetic towards these players but their paychecks far outweigh the risks when compared to what the average fan has to do to make ends meet

  6. All those teachers, factory workers , police and firemen people whine about not making as much as NFL players do not directly contribute to a 9 billion dollar business. The pool of NFL talent is infinitely smaller than normal professions.

    Quit comparing apples to oranges.

  7. @caedinealsfan20 read my comment a little more carefully. I said “we’re not unsympathetic” in other words: we are sympathetic.
    The point is that many people have inherently dangerous jobs and they do these jobs so they can support their families. NFL players get huge salaries, which justifies the risk of injury. Especially considering that many people take similar or greater risks at work so they can collect a much smaller paycheck.

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