Hue Jackson suggests NFL is investigating whether Browns violated IR rules

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Earlier on Friday, PFT pointed out that a question has emerged as to whether the Browns violated the injured reserve rules via quarterback Robert Griffin III throwing passes to a player on the active roster prior to last night’s game. Apparently, that question hasn’t been completely resolved.

In a Friday conference call with reporters, coach Hue Jackson suggested that the league is looking into the situation.

“From what I know, we did not break the rules,” Jackson said. “Obviously, until the investigation is complete, you don’t know. We will wait for them to have that down, but hopefully, everything will be all right as far as that is concerned.”

Jackson confirmed that the Browns would be in violation of the rule if Griffin had been throwing to members of the 53-man roster within 60 minutes prior to kickoff.

“Then he cannot be out there throwing to a player, any player at that particular point in time, from what I understand from the rules,” Jackson said.

“We have spoken to the club but have nothing further to add,” the NFL told PFT via email, when specifically asked whether the league is investigating the situation.

With so many cameras and video-shooting phones pointed in the direction of the field, it shouldn’t be difficult to determine whether Griffin did or didn’t throw passes to Browns players after 7:25 p.m. ET. At least one eyewitness insists that Griffin was throwing passes after 7:30 p.m.; at least one other eyewitness says otherwise.

On one hand, it’s a minor, technical violation, if it even was a violation. On the other hand, it’s a bright-line rule that relates to the proper use of players who are placed in a special category other than the 53-man roster when injured.

While some may shrug at this and say the Browns have far bigger concerns than whether Griffin was throwing passes to players on the roster within 60 minutes before kickoff, plenty of fans have seen their favorite teams hampered by the application of hypertechnicalities and/or the selective enforcement of more substantive rules that are being violated on a widespread basis or otherwise not enforced at all.

Here’s the fair question to ask about this situation: What would the league be doing if it were the Patriots? Whatever the answer, that’s how any other team should be treated, too.

26 responses to “Hue Jackson suggests NFL is investigating whether Browns violated IR rules

  1. The NFL still has not shared the results of a previous investigation.

    Now would be the perfect time for the NFL to finally release the PSI information that was collected during the 2015 season. By releasing the PSI information from the 2015 season the NFL can finally demonstrate their support for the integrity of the game.

    That report would also provide many with a much needed lesson in science when the information shows that footballs always lose PSI when taken outside on cold days.

    If the information shows that footballs always lose PSI on cold days then the NFL can then demonstrate its support of fairness and integrity. The NFL can display fairness and integrity by giving the Patriots back their stolen 2016 1st round draft pick. Letting the Patriots have the pick for the 2017 draft. A year late would be better than never.

    The NFL can also throw in an extra 1st round pick or two as compensation for making the Patriots wait a year for the pick and for making Tom Brady miss 25% of the 2016 season.

    For those who want to see the science without waiting for the NFL to do what is right… a video was posted on the popular online video site. Just search for: “DEFLATE GATE & WHY SCIENCE SAYS THE PATRIOTS DID NOT TAMPER WITH FOOTBALLS”

  2. Wouldn’t you want someone who can actually throw it near the receiver to be ‘warming up” the regular players?

  3. In RGIII’s defense, screaming in pain and dropping a football on the ground is not a “pass.”

  4. Seriously,, just leave the Browns alone. Like this is a serious violation. Team and its fans are going through enough this season.

  5. Sorry to say it but the Browns should forfeit their #1 next year and be fined $1M because that is the cost of violating (or even being generally aware of a potential violation of) even the most trivial of rules of the game. It’s Roger’s way or the highway!

  6. factpurveyor says:
    Nov 11, 2016 6:09 PM
    The NFL still has not shared the results of a previous investigation.

    Now would be the perfect time for the NFL to finally release the PSI information that was collected during the 2015 season. By releasing the PSI information from the 2015 season the NFL can finally demonstrate their support for the integrity of the game.

    ____

    Get over it petulant child. He didn’t get suspended for gas law breakage. He got suspended for his lack of cooperation with the investigation. They were told long ago that because of previous transgressions any flaunting of the rules would result in more stringent punishments. Try winning without “bending” the rules and you might get some sympathy.

  7. Get over it petulant child. He didn’t get suspended for gas law breakage. He got suspended for his lack of cooperation with the investigation.
    ————–
    You get over it you ignorant fool. Saying Brady was suspended for failure to cooperate is ignoring the fact the he was being accused of something that the NFL fabricated (11 of 12 balls more than 2 psi under) and then subsequently lied about in the appeal transcripts. If you want to remain ignorant, have at it.

  8. doctorrustbelt says:
    Nov 11, 2016 8:20 PM

    If it was the patriots… RGIII would be using deflated footballs.
    ___________________________
    What a clever comment. You must have missed this.
    Judge Berman asks NFL attorney Daniel Nash, “What is the direct evidence that implicates Mr Brady,”
    Nash had to admit that no evidence exists where Brady directly ordered a team employee to deflate the balls.
    Grow UP

  9. Well, since Truckstop Jimmy Haslam got away with stealing from truckers, it seems to have permeated the entire organization.

    We don’t need no stinkin’ rules.

  10. “the application of hypertechnicalities and/or the selective enforcement of more substantive rules”, is what’s really killing the NFL….

  11. While I can’t get too excited about the violation of “IR” rule in this instance, it’s the lack of understanding of the league rules the Browns exhibit time and time again.
    From the GM to the interns, the Cleveland organization is simply a punch line for a bad franchise.
    From their lack of understanding the most basic of rules to the ineptness of their executives who field the team with sub-par players, this franchise continues to be an embarrassment to the “Shield”.
    Give Mr. Haslem his franchise fee back and take the team away from him.

  12. reddzen says:
    Nov 11, 2016 7:51 PM

    Get over it petulant child. He didn’t get suspended for gas law breakage. He got suspended for his lack of cooperation with the investigation.
    —————————————————————–
    Those claiming that Tom Brady didn’t cooperate usually bring up a replaced telephone to make their lame arguments. Since you didn’t mention any specifics it’s probably a safe bet that you also fell for the “destroyed telephone” red herring just like the other dupes did.

    Expecting fools to grasp the concept of individual privacy while applying logic & reason is near impossibility. Using a simplistic four-word catch phrase to make and someone appear to be guilty would be easy with the media resources available to the NFL. Which is why the NFL made sure that the phrase “Brady destroyed his phone” was heard by everyone. The NFL knew that gullible people would envision someone taking a blunt instrument to a helpless phone and would assume that evidence that was destroyed.

    Tom Brady voluntarily provided the NFL with log information from his personal telephone. Brady had zero obligation to provide that information. Soon after the information was provided the media obtained a message discussing Tom Brady’s dissatisfaction with a swimming pool cover and a comment mentioning “Peyton Manning”. Now those comments are permanently available online for everyone to read until the end of time.

    If Tom Brady had handed over his Personal Telephone the NFL would have had access to, his address book, private messages, and photographs. Only complete fools, having limited critical thinking skills and no understanding of the concept of individual privacy, were gullible enough get duped into believing the “didn’t cooperate with an investigation” nonsense.

    The NFL already had the 2 telephones that were owned by the Patriots and were used by the 2 equipment guys. The NFL also had the log information that Tom Brady provided. Which means that the NFL already had 2 sources to see all information related to conversations with the equipment guys.

    Which also means that Tom Brady could not withhold relevant information when he provided the logs. It also means that the “destroyed phone” contained no unknown information related to the investigation. Let this concept sink in….There was no evidence on the telephone!

    What the personal telephone did contain is private information related to Tom Brady’s family and friends. Information that tabloids would be willing to pay for. (Now remember that personal information had already been leaked to the media).

    The recent election should demonstrate how important it was for the NFL to never see that telephone. Brady’s address book contained the private contact information for a future President. In addition to countless A-List celebrities and both current and retired athletes. Tom Brady had the right and obligation to keep it all private.

    The NFL had no right to examine his personal telephone and Tom Brady had zero obligation to let them. It’s called privacy and in this country you don’t have to prove your innocence. Remember the NFL is not a law enforcement agency. If the NFL had asked, should Tom Brady have been obligated to let the NFL search his home while a camera crew filmed the search? Then if Tom Brady refused the home search should he have been suspended for “not cooperating with an investigation”.

    Or is Tom Brady just obligated to hand over a personal telephone because it’s more portable than a house? I don’t believe that convenience is a determining factor that should eliminate someone’s right to privacy. If convenience was relevant then people with small homes should be more obligated to allow home searches by their employers than those with large homes. It won’t take long for the search a small home so what’s the harm?

    If you are not guilty then why wouldn’t you let anyone that accuses you of something search your home? Would you support random searches to make people can prove they are innocent? Or is searching through someone’s private information acceptable only after the NFL make up false PSI information and blames someone for what the weather does naturally?

  13. ROGER , you should check an see if ROMO WAS THROWING PASSES “he hasn’t ben medicaly cleared ” before word broke HE WAS PRACTICING .
    AND correct me if i’m wrong “A BROKEN BONE IN YOUR BACK is by far worse than a shoulder problem “

  14. “Here’s the fair question to ask about this situation: What would the league be doing if it were the Patriots? Whatever the answer, that’s how any other team should be treated, too.”

    Actually, just the reverse: the Patriots should be treated reasonably. Instead of abusing all teams for ticky-tacky violations, treat minor technicalities as a reason for an unofficial warning, not for an NFL-ballistic action, even if it is the Patriots with the minor violation.

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