Hue Jackson suggests he received assurance when hired that he won’t be one and done

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What makes Browns coach Hue Jackson so sure he won’t be fired after one season even if the team doesn’t win a single game? In explaining the situation on Tuesday, Jackson suggested that he received an assurance during the hiring process that he won’t be fired after only one year.

“I am not distracted by what my fate will be because I never would have taken this job if I thought it was going to be anything other than me being here and seeing this through,” Jackson told reporters. “That part has never been an issue for me. Being 0-12 is hard on anybody. That is hard, period. I don’t like to lose — I have said that before — and I don’t like being in this situation, but I know we are going to fix it. . . . We have to do it brick by brick and step by step. I know we are in the midst of doing that. Like I said, we have great discussions and I know we will act on the things we need to do to get this place where we all want it to be and we know it needs to be.”

Asked whether he can overlook the fact that current ownership relieved coaches of their duties after only one or two seasons, Jackson said, “I have trust in the people who hired me. Those questions have been asked. I wouldn’t be standing here. You have to ask those hard questions. I feel very comfortable that they are committed to what we are trying to do. They haven’t been anything but committed that way. Continuity is a huge piece of this. They told me that from the outset and I knew it. Now, did I know we were going to be where we are today? No, I didn’t and I don’t think anybody did, but this is where we are and this is our reality. There is no getting around that. This is not where any of us want to be so we just have to fix it.”

Jackson confirmed that he asked blunt questions during the interview process aimed at confirming that he wouldn’t have a short stay as the head coach.

“I know the history here,” Jackson said. “Trust me, I don’t need you guys to tell me. I know it extremely well. I get it. I do not like our organization being the brunt of jokes and what has gone on here, but if this is what we have to go through to get to where we want to be then so be it. I am not going to tell you it is not hard. It is the hardest thing I have ever dealt with in football in my career. I have never seen this. I have never imagined this. I never could have said it would be like this, but if this is what it is to get where we want to go then so be it. It is worth it.”

He’s not the first coach who suffered through an awful initial season in the hopes of laying the foundation for success. Jimmy Johnson went 1-15 in 1989 with the Cowboys, three years before hoisting back-to-back Lombardis. Likewise, one-time Cleveland Brown Chuck Noll was 1-13 in his initial season as the Steelers head coach in 1969, winning his first game and losing the rest five years before winning four Super Bowls in six years.

Of course, just because a coach has a dreadful initial season doesn’t mean that good things are destined to come. The Browns, like the 1989 Cowboys and 1969 Steelers before them, need to lay the foundation by making good decisions when it comes to personnel acquisition.

In this regard, quantity doesn’t mean quality. As one league source opined in the aftermath of receiver Taylor Gabriel’s strong performance for the Falcons, it was amazing that the Browns couldn’t find a spot for Gabriel on the roster, especially since they initially retained all 14 of their draft picks.

Some wondered at the time whether the decision to keep all 14 draft picks was driven by a desire to show that the new Browns, a blend of old-school football and new-age Moneyball concepts, got it right with every young player they picked. If so, the cost was the loss of a talented receiver who could be a significant weapon for the Falcons as the playoff push continues.

If the Browns quickly find themselves annually in the playoff push, it will have been worth it. Before that can happen, Jackson needs to push hard for a win or sweat out the question of whether Jimmy and Dee Haslam will decide that Jackson can be brought back if his first season matches the 2008 Lions for the worst season in NFL history.

The fact that they haven’t said Jackson definitely will be back no matter the outcome of the season suggests that there is a set of circumstances where they possibly will decide to make a change. In that regard, Jackson’s expressions of confidence and determination are irrelevant; after all, he was confident and determined five years ago after his first, and only, full season in Oakland, too.

44 responses to “Hue Jackson suggests he received assurance when hired that he won’t be one and done

  1. A few years ago, in Theo’s first year. the Chicago Cubs lost 100 games.

    You don’t fire management (GM and coach) over a bad first year.

    Cleveland is terrible. There is no question. But Jackson needs at least another year to determine if they are on the right track.

    Starting over would be very Browsy, but it would be the wrong decision..

  2. … yes, because Jimmy Haslam would never be the kind of white collar criminal who would guarantee you something and not deliver on it.

  3. Certainly not much was expected from the Browns this year. Even one win should save the HC. But I sure couldn’t keep a coach that went winless an entire season.

  4. It would be very unwise to can the coach. A key to a good football team is stability. Jackson inherited a JV team and has seen I-don’t-know-how-many QB’s go down. Give him a year or two at least!

  5. Let the man coach.

    Desperate, delusional Browns fans and Browns haters with their fingers crossed hoping for continued easy divisional games are annoying.

  6. I don’t think Jackson is the wrong guy, but I don’t think he’s necessarily the right guy. He’s just a guy. I would guess that when they start winning, somebody else will be doing the coaching in Cleveland.

  7. Like you could put faith in any assurances you got from that owner/front office? There are like 4 guys all trying to simultaneously serve as the GM, none the boss of any of the others, all reporting straight to Haslam. After this season there will be fingers pointing every which way trying to pin it on somebody.

  8. Hue – seriously, dude was a dumpster fire in Oakland (Carson Palmer trade alone should banish him for life) and while some will say he made the Bengals offense go – meh – they’ve not exactly done anything with him there and they’re doing the same without.

    Guy’s not worth what he thinks he is.

    Cleveland fans – do you REALLY and honestly believe this guy can get that team to the playoffs consistently or even a title run?

    If you do – it’s time to check in with Johnny 8-ball.

  9. I think Hue’s character is to choose those impossible or extremely challenging situations. I think he can turn this organization around but they haven’t really kept games close this year. He needs to give a Lombardi type speech and get these guys to physically push the other team around all four quarters.

  10. Yeah I don’t think there is any chance he’ll be fired after one season. But whenever he does get fired, people will call it racism…

  11. The Browns have only posted two winning seasons this century. That kind of ineptitude doesn’t get turned around in one year.

  12. dx2nc says:
    Nov 29, 2016 5:00 PM
    Certainly not much was expected from the Browns this year. Even one win should save the HC. But I sure couldn’t keep a coach that went winless an entire season.
    __________________

    Winning one without SF winning another one first might be more likely to cost him his job at this point. The Niners are making it really hard to pull an Indy this year.

  13. teal379 says:
    Nov 29, 2016 5:08 PM

    Cleveland fans – do you REALLY and honestly believe this guy can get that team to the playoffs consistently or even a title run?
    ———————

    Playoffs consistently? Title run? Seriously?

    Hue might not be the best coach out there, but at some point the Browns need to get off of that carousel that comes around with a new coach every two years.

    7 coaches and 45 quarterbacks since 1999 obviously isn’t working, so why not give a guy 3 or 4 years, and see if he can actually build a team? It isn’t like their performance has dropped off of a cliff or anything.

  14. There is absolutely no justifiable reason to keep a coach who goes 0-16. You gotta almost try to go 0-16 .. which I honestly wonder if they are. Especially since Jackson pulled their QB at half time of a game they were winning.. only to let it slip away late. Browns fans should save their money and paper bags for 2017.

  15. Most of the negativity comes from the fact that they are trying something completely new. Just about everybody is change-averse. The Moneyball concepts are stupid, according to most people. That belief stems from the fact that no one has tried them in pro football before. Most people were ready to dismiss this plan as stupid after the first game.

    I say, give it a shot. But it will take a good 3 years to know if it’s any good or not.

    Plus, I don’t think they’re going 0-16. I know of a few high school teams that could beat Cinci-nasty right now.

  16. Sachi Brown has turned the Browns into a statistical evaluation through Moneyball. He even stated this is a rebuilding year. That’s the reason for their pathetic performance this season. You can’t blame Hue when Brown decimated the roster and got rid of the most important offensive lineman, Alex Mack, because centers are “interchangeable”. I bet all those hurt QBs didn’t see Mack as disposable.

  17. If only Jackson had a promising young quarterback like Carson Wentz at the helm. Somehow Wentz ended up in Philly and Jackson got stuck with RG3. How did that happen?

    Hue Jackson did better in Cinci because they had better talent. Part of that talent being the result of suckering Oakland into giving up several high draft picks for Carson Palmer. Jackson and the Browns organization should try to figure out who was the idiot in Oakland responsible for that trade and see if they can exploit him again.

  18. Yeah, Hue… You can trust them. It’s like the 3 great lies:
    1. The check is in the mail.
    2. I’ll still love you in the morning.
    3. I promise …… we won’t go there.

  19. Man I hope Hue got that promise in writing.

    Seriously though. The Browns need to hang onto a coaching staff for about 3 years. Continuity is vastly under rated in the NFL.

  20. jgedgar70 says:
    Nov 29, 2016 5:29 PM
    Most of the negativity comes from the fact that they are trying something completely new. Just about everybody is change-averse. The Moneyball concepts are stupid, according to most people. That belief stems from the fact that no one has tried them in pro football before.
    ===================

    You are operating from a similar misconception to the one you ascribe to others. Moneyball as it applies to roster building in football has been being practiced in New England for the past 16 years and to a smaller extent in Seattle for the past 6 years.

  21. C’mon already. The reason Gabriel is gone is the same reason Mack, Schwartz, Gipson et all are gone. Haslam isn’t spending money!! All four years he has owned the team, his Browns have been bottom 6 in spending. The Browns blatantly bamboozle Browns fans by saying that they don’t spend money so they can pay the young players coming up… then they don’t sign them. Big smoke and mirrors show. But Haslam laughs all the way to the bank as Browns fans line his pockets with sellouts, No smarter owner in the NFL, maximizing his his revenue by not spending money; no dumber fans.

  22. The problem in Cleveland is the ownership.

    Haslam is a con man who stole millions of dollars from his PilotFlyingJ customers and no doubt used some of that money to buy the team.

    Now he’s conning Cleveland fans. The Browns are almost 48 million under the cap, almost 8 million more than the next lowest team.

    Haslam has zero intention of ever putting a winning product on the field. His only goal is to keep the money machine rolling so he can replace the revenue stream his PilotFlyingJ con.

    What coach can take a budget so far under that of every other team and be competitive? Even Belichick would have trouble limited like that.

  23. therealraider says:
    Nov 29, 2016 5:28 PM

    There is absolutely no justifiable reason to keep a coach who goes 0-16.
    ———————–

    Sure there is, if that guy is in his first year of coaching the Browns.

  24. Considering the management who fired all those previous coaches got fired themselves he’s probably right. Pretty sure the Harvard guys knew the team was going to struggle back during the off season when they dumped the majority of the teams veterans after free agency was nearly over and replaced them with rookies and 2017 draft picks. Cleveland is the second youngest team in the league behind the also struggling L.A. Rams. Both are basically college all star teams playing against NFL pro’s (and if you think about it that way that’s actually kind of impressive).

    The bigger question is will Haslam keep the Harvard guys. Their plan is going to need at least 3 years to work. That’s more time than his previous management has gotten combined.

  25. I am not a fan of Hue Jackson, and he did drive The Raiders into a state of rock bottom that defies logic. Hue Jackson is also a coach that openly believes that 8-8 is winning.

    That being said Hue Jackson is not going to be fired. The entire organization is operating under a new and unproven concept. They traded out the draft in order to stock pile future picks, and have started seven rookies.

    If you didn’t think that the Browns would be in this exact spot when the season started maybe you should limit yourself to the pro pot legalization stories.

  26. The Brown’s motto where it concerns coaching and front office personnel is ‘next man up’, so I wouldn’t be so sure Hue.
    Surely no one said, “even if you go 0-16 you should have no reason to believe you will be fired Hue”.

  27. Asking a head coach to win in that organization is like asking a person who weighs 400 lbs not to eat at McDonalds. It aint happenin’……

  28. raiderinva says:
    Nov 29, 2016 6:21 PM

    I am not a fan of Hue Jackson, and he did drive The Raiders into a state of rock bottom that defies logic. Hue Jackson is also a coach that openly believes that 8-8 is winning.
    ———————–

    What are you talking about? Jackson was the Raiders head coach for only one season, and he got them to 8-8, which was the best record they had had in years.

  29. Tom Landry did not win a game his first season with the Cowboys. He didn’t have a winning season until year 7. Then of course he ripped off 20 winning seasons in a row. But he didn’t coach in the internet era.

  30. mmack66 says:
    Nov 29, 2016 6:54 PM
    raiderinva says:
    Nov 29, 2016 6:21 PM

    I am not a fan of Hue Jackson, and he did drive The Raiders into a state of rock bottom that defies logic. Hue Jackson is also a coach that openly believes that 8-8 is winning.
    ———————–

    What are you talking about? Jackson was the Raiders head coach for only one season, and he got them to 8-8, which was the best record they had had in years.
    _______________________________________

    They were 8-8 the year before too, under Tom Cable. Does that make Cable a great coach?
    The Raiders in 2011 were at 7-4 when the players quit on Jackson. He lost the locker room, putting the team into a spin. Giving up the high picks for his man Palmer set them back even more.

  31. The last coach was fired after going 3-13 and tied for worst in the league. What should Hue expect when going 0-16 and being the absolute worst team in the league?

  32. The Browns horrible record this year isn’t even a surprise given the plan they put in place. I can live with a winless season the first year. If they were to fire Jackson after the first year all hope would be gone.

  33. The reason that Taylor Gabriel got cut is that he was lousy last year for the Browns, and he got beat out for his spot on the team by Andrew Hawkins in preseason this year. They’re essentially the same guy, and no team needs two receivers under 5′ 8″.

  34. They may be 48 million under the cap but that will change when they find a 20 million franchise quarterback. That’s not a world beater. That’s the going rate for GOOD qb’s like Cousins, Flacco, Ryan, etc….

  35. nighttrain59 says:
    Nov 29, 2016 7:38 PM

    They were 8-8 the year before too, under Tom Cable. Does that make Cable a great coach?
    ————————–

    Neither one of them are great coaches, but 8-8 was the best the Raiders had seen for years.

  36. hereismyid says:
    Nov 29, 2016 5:34 PM
    If only Jackson had a promising young quarterback like Carson Wentz at the helm. Somehow Wentz ended up in Philly and Jackson got stuck with RG3. How did that happen?

    Hue Jackson did better in Cinci because they had better talent. Part of that talent being the result of suckering Oakland into giving up several high draft picks for Carson Palmer. Jackson and the Browns organization should try to figure out who was the idiot in Oakland responsible for that trade and see if they can exploit him again.

    ————————————————–

    Hue Jackson brought up the trade proposition and Raiders owner Mark Davis signed off on the trade — allegedly.

  37. All this pi$$ing and moaning! Never should have traded so and so, should have taken Bridgewater, should have taken Goff, should have taken Wentz (BTW, Eagles are 5-6 and in last place in their division), should have take Brady or Manning years ago. All those moaners haven’t a clue as to what makes a winning football team.
    Ask yourself “how many playoffs did they make when they had Mack, Schwartz, et al? How many QBs suffered injury, concussions, etc. with that line. How often did Gabriel look like Jones, Odell-Beckham, et al? How many teams did they hold to less than 20 points/game? Their best season the past few years was against very weak, and also, rebuilding teams plus a couple of big upsets.
    You definitely need a good coaching staff to win (Pettine and his staff was terrible). But most of all, you need great defense and a great O-line. If they had one big fault in the draft was not taking more linemen rather than all those WRs.

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