Bears may play their coldest game ever on Sunday

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The Bears have played plenty of cold-weather games during their years in Chicago, but Sunday’s game against the Packers may be the coldest game ever played at Soldier Field.

The latest forecast calls for a temperature of 1 degree below zero on Sunday at noon Central time, when the Bears are kicking off against the Packers. The Bears say they’ve been tracking kickoff temperatures since 1963, and the coldest kickoff time on record was 2 degrees on December 22, 2008, for another game against the Packers. So if the forecasts are correct, Sunday’s game will be the coldest ever seen in Chicago.

That could be bad news for Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers, who has been dealing with calf and hamstring injuries. In cold weather, it’s harder to keep muscles loose, and with Rodgers already not moving at 100 percent, his mobility could be limited.

Where it could be good news for the Packers, however, is in the stands: The Bears are already playing in front of plenty of empty seats as they struggle through a lousy season. With subzero temperatures on Sunday, Chicagoans may decide to watch the game from the comfort of home, and the Bears may not have any home-field advantage. The cold, in fact, may disadvantage both teams equally.

99 responses to “Bears may play their coldest game ever on Sunday

  1. Packer fans have proven they really don’t like cold weather football. They couldn’t sell out Lambeau Field for their last home playoff game.

    They were forced to have a corporate bailout so that the average fan could watch the game at home while sitting on their couch…

  2. Weather in KC is also supposed to be 9 at kickoff Sunday with wind chills -10 to -20. December football is cold – but these are a bit extreme.

  3. Love this! -1* F. Awesome. That has to be so much fun to play in. No shirt during pre-game warmups baby!! GB will be just fine. This will only be Green Bay’s 10,006th game ever in sub freezing temperatures. Besides everybody knows the Packers get 9 home games each year – 8 in Green Bay at Lambeau and 1 in beautiful Chitown at Soldier Field. I heard Madden say this once himself. Should be fun!

  4. Jay Glazer…. Goodell, Mara and Rooney are making a fool of you with their “comfortable all protocols were followed”, “much ado about nothing” and “the Giants’ gauge was not an official gauge” statements.

    Jay you need to be at this game, film the gauging of a football at room temperature, take it to the field and do a halftime gauging….live, then show us the pregame gauging (otherwise they’ll silence you before you get a chance).

    Won’t matter if the gauge is not a certified official one, measurements will be relative to the same gauge.

    We’re tired of the contempt these people have for us fans (their customers).

  5. th3cheesestandsalone says:
    Dec 15, 2016 8:46 AM
    I was at that game. The stands were packed, it was miserable. I don’t blame anyone who’d rather watch a game from the comfort of their couch.
    ————————————–

    I was at that game too as well as the NFCCG v. NYG in -4 and the NFCCG in chicago in jan 2011.

    Those were nice evenings but I had to wear a hat.

  6. The high for Minneapolis on Sunday is -9. The HIGH! Glad the Vikes aren’t still playing at TCF Bank Stadium. Good luck this week Bears.

  7. I was at the game in ’08. My beer literally froze in the plastic cup. Brett Favre said in the Chicago Tribune the next day that it was the worst conditions he’s ever played in. It was colder than a polar bear’s toenail on the shady side of an iceberg.

  8. You guys need to get off the psi craze. You don’t need Glazer or anyone else to show you the ideal gas law is real… you already know it’s real.

    I spent most of my life in a field where the ideal gas law and other laws of physics came into play on a daily basis. The minute I heard this story for the very first time I knew exactly what was up.

    Brady and the Pats got robbed, of this I have no doubt. My only guess is that they got it because the equipment guy took the balls into the bathroom post-inspection.

    There’s one scenario I haven’t seen talked about that is a real possibility, given the numbers. We know the legal range is 12.5 – 13.5 psi at inspection. I would guess that officiating crews are all over the place on this, just like they are on everything else. Let us suppose the crew that day always demanded 13.5, so the Pats presented the balls for inspection at 13.5. Then the equipment guy dropped them to 12.5 or just above, which is what Brady prefers and is still perfectly legal. Then the ideal gas law came into play, and the world went insane.

  9. briang123 says:
    Dec 15, 2016 9:17 AM

    Global warming.

    ——————————————

    Is something you don’t understand. But hey, why listen to scientists when I got this guy.

  10. We wont need guages. At gillette stadium the game started at 51 degree and end ended in low 40’s. Balls were filled in the locker room (prob 70-75 degrees- like all locker rooms). If that temp change dropped the average patriots ball by 1.2 PSI, then filling up the ball in locker room (which EVERY SINGLE team does), and bringing them out in temps FIFTY DEGREES colder should drop them significantly more. So much that anyone who’s never held a football would notice its deflated. 75-45 degress is 30 degrees difference which equated to 1.2 psi change (on average). 75-0 degree is 75 degrees difference, more than 2 times the amount. So average ball in this game will be at LEAST 2.5 psi low on average. Thats a change any qb, defensive lineman, or joe shmo in the stands can notice lol. And apparently this has been happening forever and not 1 single person has noticed……quite incredible.

  11. I went to the -26 nfccg in lambeau. Not an empty seat to be found. I don’t know what you’re all talking about and I have no use for the bears or packers.

  12. atthemurph says:
    Dec 15, 2016 9:13 AM

    I was at that game too as well as the NFCCG v. NYG in -4 and the NFCCG in chicago in jan 2011.

    Those were nice evenings but I had to wear a hat.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    A hat? I’m disappointed. What kind of weakling are you?

  13. At least it’ll be cold for both teams, so it’ll be a fair game. Imagine if the Bears were hosting the Cardinals, and Arians could make excuses by complaining about how much colder it was when they had the ball, like John Fox is the NFL’s Night’s King or something.

  14. The Almighty Cabbage says:
    Dec 15, 2016 9:28 AM

    Yea, changing the pressure after the official inspection is cheating, even if u ‘think’ they dropped it to exactly 12.5′. Regardless, starting at 12.5, and losing an average of 1.2 psi in 51 degree weather is INSANE. And in this game, the balls would drop easily 2.5 PSI if the ideal gas law does cause that drastic of a PSI change. You cannot say “with the patriots, 51 degree weather dropped psi more than 1 psi per ball. But in this game with temps 50 degrees COLDER there will be the same drop in PSI”. If ideal gas law is consistent and real, then these balls for this game will drop on average 2.5 psi. And if your telling me a pro qb who has thrown thousands and thousands of balls cant tell me the difference between a ball at 12.5 psi to 10 psi then you are certifiably insane. Drew Brees was on a talk show and handed random footballs, he felt them and said the EXACT psi of each football handed to him, he was deadd on for each one.

  15. .
    Green Bay and Chicago can handle the cold. I’m not sure that the Tennessee Titans will fare as well in Kansas City. Unfortunately for the Titans, they desperately need a win. Playing the 10-3 Chiefs at Arrowhead in single digit temps is doing it the hard way.
    .

  16. Should be a Fox broadcast, no chance they have their sideline reporter for the game test comparable balls pre, during and post game with the exact model of gauge the NFL uses for testing.

  17. footballfanatic says:
    “Thats a change any qb, defensive lineman, or joe shmo in the stands can notice lol. And apparently this has been happening forever and not 1 single person has noticed……quite incredible.”

    _________________________________________

    this is what i do not understand. How can balls suddenly be affected by weather? I have been watching football since the mid 80s. I have seen some cold games. I have never heard of the ball losing PSI, let alone so much that would be noticeable, and it went undetected.

  18. @footballfanatic-

    I agree, the Pats should never have changed them after the inspection. Like I said, I think that’s exactly what brought down the wrath of Goodell.

    I also don’t “think they dropped them to exactly 12.5” I’m just presenting the possibility, as a case where the Pats would maintain they were still within the letter of the law. Belichick does like to push the envelope. It’s one of the reasons he’s the best coach in the game today, and possibly ever.

    As for the exact droppage in psi, I won’t speculate. I’d have to do the numbers and I’d need very exact data to do so properly (temps, relative humidity of the air that went into the ball, and the exact volume of the inside of a football, and I may still be forgetting something).

    If the NFL is this concerned over it, they should fill the balls with Nitrogen. It’s still subject to the ideal gas law but it reacts in a much more stable, predictable manner.

  19. That could be bad news for Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers, who likes his footballs at the upper end of the permissible psi range. In cold weather, the footballs will natural lose psi, and with Rodgers already not moving at 100 percent, his passing could be limited.

    There fixed it for ya.

  20. I live in a city where it doesn’t snow or hardly even rains. My hat goes off to all of you fans, players and stadium employees who attend these frigid games! You are a big part of what makes the NFL experience special. I wish you all a safe and enjoyable experience. My hat goes off so you can put it on! Good luck to all of you.

  21. Even direct sunlight can have an effect. Ever notice race cars in the pits with tire covers on them? It’s certainly not to keep them clean. It’s to keep the radiant heat of direct sunlight from warming the tires and affecting the pressures.

    It’s why it feels so nice when the sun comes out from behind a cloud on a cool day.

  22. ariani1985 says:
    Dec 15, 2016 8:48 AM
    Green Bay had over 35000 empty seats during their last home playoff game/loss against the 49ers. Half the crowd was Californians
    ____________________________________
    I was at the game, it was packed and miserable with -40 degree windchills. There were very few 49er fans.
    No idea where everyone is getting the idea that fans werent there. Go back and watch the game footage.

  23. Someone needs to have a formal complaint already typed up, and make sure they are using protocol approved pressure gauges.

  24. Green Bay had over 35000 empty seats during their last home playoff game/loss against the 49ers. Half the crowd was Californian
    _____________________

    I was there and youre full of crap..there was not one empty seat

  25. The Almighty Cabbage says:
    Dec 15, 2016 9:56 AM

    So your contention is that the patriots had the balls at 13.5 and the officials checked them and they were legal. Then the patriots just shoved a needle in there and dropped them a random amount, some were up to 1.6 below the 12.5 legal limit. Yea, THATS CHEATING. thats not ‘pushing the envelope’, thats straight up cheating. If they wanted balls at 12.5, thats how they would set them before the officials checked them and then not touch them. Are you really that clueless? It makes no sense whatsoever to have them checked at 13.5, then sneak them into a bathroom and drop them some unknown amount of PSI.

  26. th3cheesestandsalone says:
    Dec 15, 2016 9:16 AM
    Real northern teams don’t play in domes….

    ————————————–

    While to some extent I agree since playing outdoors is awesome in the fall. But, Ill be honest, I don’t really want to sit in frigid Michigan weather in December or January if The Lions ever make a deep run.

    Plus, from a sheer business standpoint building a domed stadium makes more sense because it can used to concerts, ETC during the cold months as well.

  27. Colder than when the Niners went in during the 1988
    NFC Champ game and won 28-3 as underdogs?

  28. people claiming that a QB, official, or anyone else could easily tell the difference, outside, in the PSI of a ball that dropped 2 or 2.5 psi due to the cold forget the fact that the ball is cold, and their hands are cold or are wearing gloves, thereby effecting the sensations they feel.

    That Drew Brees can feel the difference between balls with different pressure amounts, but are at the same temperature, while his naked hands are at room temperature doesn’t have any correlation to cold balls outside on a cold day.

    Are common sense and logic a thing of the past?

  29. edukator4 says:
    Dec 15, 2016 9:49 AM

    this is what i do not understand. How can balls suddenly be affected by weather? I have been watching football since the mid 80s. I have seen some cold games. I have never heard of the ball losing PSI, let alone so much that would be noticeable, and it went undetected.
    ———————-

    Footballs have always been affected by the weather, and except for one game, no one has ever given a damn about it. They still don’t.

    Psigate was nothing more than a fraud perpetrated in order to further inflate Roger’s ego.

  30. 345snarkavenue says:
    Dec 15, 2016 10:19 AM

    A defensive player who intercepted Tom felt that the ball was low. A guy who was in the same conditions as Tom. A guy who handles a game ball prob 6-12 times PER YEAR between int’s and fumble recoveries noticed it. But a QB, who handles that ball 60+ snaps/game plus countless throws on the sideline couldnt notice? The guy who had that ball set to his EXACT specifications couldnt notice? Is that common sense and logic???

  31. Cabbage, please look up the definitions of grip and maximum slick tire performance and you will see the light of that sun coming out from behind that cloud.

  32. viking fans barely show up to watch their team when it’s 70 degrees INDOORS. And that’s with year after year of having to take corporate bailouts from Armour Meats and 3M. What a sad commentary on the fans. You can’t even call them fairweather fans because… the team plays INDOORS.

  33. mmack66 says:
    Dec 15, 2016 10:23 AM

    Football players are diva’s. Eli spends 3 months preparing his game ballls, yes 3 months! Your telling me in cold games 20% of the air goes missing and doesnt care and just ‘deals’ with it? Seriously? Not once has someone said ‘hey this is low, can we just pump it up to where it started?’. come on, u cant be that ridiculous.

  34. mmack66 says:
    Dec 15, 2016 10:23 AM

    And some former qb’s are trying to back up tom. Not one of them has said “this happens to us all”. NOT ONE. If this is common and ‘everyone deals with it’ then why hasnt one single qb came out and said ‘this is really no big deal, we all deal with it’. Not one person has said that it has happened to them.

  35. Aaaaaaaand Patriots fans ruin yet another thread whining incessantly like a 2-year old toddler about the deflated balls. Your well earned reputation of being the worst fans in all of sports precedes you.

  36. “Can we get some PSI recordings on those balls pre, during, and post game?”

    Between the media and the NFL this has really whipped up into a stat to track. Do the measurements on TV. If not game ball measurements maybe the media could do an experiment with a specific gauge with a ball in the weather and a control ball in the booth and take readings throughout the game with that single, same gauge. Might even have an unbiased university perform the test. Educate us all on the Ideal Gas Law, including the NFL. End the smoke and mirrors.

  37. The “real football is played outdoors” narrative is getting kind of old. It get that it is cute and fun to take selfies with your beanie hats on in the snow, but in the NFC north division, it gets to the point where it is unsafe to be outside for prolonged periods of time. The “tough guy” attitude is cool and all, but when you have deal with -20 degrees on a daily basis and wait 30 minutes for your engine block to thaw before you can drive it every morning or cancelling school because of temperatures, sitting outside for 3 hours + is a solid “no thanks.”

    Green Bay can afford having an open stadium because it is a historic site, but it is a city of 100,000 people.

    Chicago can afford to have an open stadium because it is third largest city in the country that has multiple venues.

    Minnesota on the other hand, needs a multi use facility that can be utilized for 1/3 of the year with something other than football.

    Detroit is just soft.

  38. th3cheesestandsalone says:
    Dec 15, 2016 9:16 AM
    Real northern teams don’t play in domes….
    ————————————————–
    By “northern” teams, do you mean NFC North teams? Name one that currently plays in a dome.

  39. Rodgers and Barkley should pass for a combined total of about 75 yards. Jordan Howard should run for about 250 and bring me a fantasy win. 🙂

  40. For all the Ideal Gas Law people – here is how it works:
    The pressure of an ideal gas (like air) is related by a simple equation to the volume it occupies and its temperature, P ~ T/V. If the temperature of the air INSIDE the ball changes, and we assume that the volume of the football is constant, then the pressure of the air inside the ball would change. However, the outside air temperature doesn’t tell us anything about the temperature of the air INSIDE the ball.

  41. moezilla says:

    By “northern” teams, do you mean NFC North teams? Name one that currently plays in a dome.

    ______________________________________

    i have to believe you meant AFC north. because youre right, I cant name ONE

  42. granadafan says:
    Dec 15, 2016 10:33 AM
    Aaaaaaaand Patriots fans ruin yet another thread whining incessantly like a 2-year old toddler about the deflated balls. Your well earned reputation of being the worst fans in all of sports precedes you.

    ——-

    nothing like whining about whining, is there?

    May The Farce Be With You!

  43. moezilla says:
    Dec 15, 2016 10:44 AM

    By “northern” teams, do you mean NFC North teams? Name one that currently plays in a dome.
    =================

    A semantics argument based on architecural terms? Really? To any real football fan ‘dome’ is a blanket term for any indoor location where NFL football is played in front of fans they know are too soft to go to games outdoors.

  44. justafanofnfl says:
    Dec 15, 2016 10:51 AM

    He is the one who gave the ball to the equipment guy and told him it felt weird. Im guessing you believe in ideal gas law? So please tell me how much psi will drop in this game sunday? if 1.3 psi drop on average at 45-50 degree weather, then how much in -1 degree weather? Please give me your opinion. And how much air needs to be missing before a player realizes it?

  45. maust1013 says:
    Dec 15, 2016 10:11 AM
    The Almighty Cabbage says:
    Dec 15, 2016 9:28 AM
    There’s one scenario I haven’t seen talked about that is a real possibility, given the numbers. We know the legal range is 12.5 – 13.5 psi at inspection. I would guess that officiating crews are all over the place on this, just like they are on everything else. Let us suppose the crew that day always demanded 13.5, so the Pats presented the balls for inspection at 13.5…
    ==================

    You have to be new to this. Ref Walt Anderson checked the balls pregame and they were set at 12.5. Unlike the league Pats fans are willing to trust his best recollection.
    @fanatics recollections on the other hand have shown a bit of bias

  46. footballfanatic says:
    Dec 15, 2016 10:26 AM
    345snarkavenue says:
    Dec 15, 2016 10:19 AM

    A defensive player who intercepted Tom felt that the ball was low. A guy who was in the same conditions as Tom. A guy who handles a game ball prob 6-12 times PER YEAR between int’s and fumble recoveries noticed it. But a QB, who handles that ball 60+ snaps/game plus countless throws on the sideline couldnt notice? The guy who had that ball set to his EXACT specifications couldnt notice? Is that common sense and logic???

    ———-

    how can one achieve common sense and logic when the argument is based upon false information?

    the Colts’ staff claimed Jackson said the ball psi felt low, as a reason for their staff gauging them before alerting league officials. Jackson himself has said that he never made that claim.

    in fact this is what Jackson said about it:
    “I wouldn’t know how that could even be an advantage or a disadvantage,” Jackson said. “I definitely wouldn’t be able to tell if one ball had less pressure than another.”

    I got that quote from the NFL website. google ‘d’qwell jackson deflategate’. will likely be the first result.

  47. 345snarkavenue says:
    Dec 15, 2016 11:11 AM

    How can one achieve common sense by suggesting a qb who spends 3 months getting his ball to EXACT specifications can have that same ball lose 20% of its inflation and the qb just ‘had no idea’? Please explain that to me. Not one single qb in the history of the nfl has noticed this. And i get guys like brady or even peyton who openly said they prefer underinflated balls not saying anything (because it helps them). But guys like Rogers who prefer OVER inflated balls? his 13.5 psi ball drops to around 11 psi and he has no clue? Really? Maybe A-Rod didnt know what was going into his system? Maybe Lance Armstrong was ‘confused’ about whats acceptable? LOL. If Tom’s balllls drop 1.2 psi on average in 50 degree weather, please enlighten me with your ‘common sense’ as to what these footballs sunday will be at in -1 degree weather?????

  48. maust1013 says:
    Dec 15, 2016 11:08 AM
    maust1013 says:
    Dec 15, 2016 10:11 AM
    The Almighty Cabbage says:
    Dec 15, 2016 9:28 AM

    Since when can the Ref demand balls to be at 13.5 psi? The patriots openly said they set their balls for 12.5, thats how they set them according to their own guages, then handed them to officials, who agreed with their own guages they are at 12.5. Whats the problem with what psi the balls started at? Every single game of every single yr the patriots set the balls at 12.5, even if the refs never checked them, id say they started at 12.5 based on the fact thats how tom demands them (to be within regulation before the game).

  49. I was at Gillette Stadium for the Titans/ Patriots playoff game in January 2004. It was 4 degrees at kickoff and temps went down as the game went on as it was a night game. Wind chill made it feel even colder. During the game they kept making announcements that you could go into the Pats’ indoor practice facility if you needed to get out of the cold and that you would be allowed to re-enter the stadium.

    This was the game where they have the video of a Titans player on the sidelines saying “I’m freaking out, man. I can’t feel my feet.”

    Years later when people hear I was at the game they ask me how it was. I start by saying it was a much better game to say you were at than it was to actually be at. To this day I’m not sure if attending the game earns a badge of honor or a badge of stupidity. My wife then chimes in about how I had five layers of winter gear on and was still cold when I got home after over an hour drive back from the stadium.

    This game looks to have a slightly colder temp at kickoff but windchill won’t be quite as bad as that Pats Titans game but it is still going to be miserable for the fans in attendance.

  50. The guy who said he had to wear a hat reminded me of:

    The Frozen Logger (Cisco Houston)

    As I set down one evening, within a small cafe,
    A 40-year-old waitress, to me these words did say:
    “I see you are a logger and not just a common bum,
    For nobody but a logger stirs his coffee with his thumb

    “My lover was a logger, there’s none like him today…
    If you’d pour whisky on it, he would eat a bale of hay…
    He never shaved the whiskers from off his horny hide
    He’d pound them in with a hammer, then bite them off inside

    “My lover came to see me, upon one freezing day,
    He held me in a fond embrace that broke three vertebrae…
    He kissed me when we parted, so hard that it broke my jaw…
    I could not speak to tell him he’d forgot his mackinaw…

    “I saw my lover leaving, sauntering through the snow…
    Heading gaily homeward, at forty eight below…
    The weather tried to freeze him, it tried it’s level best…
    At a hundred degrees below zero, he buttoned up his vest…

    “It froze clean thru to China, it froze to the stars above…
    At a thousand degrees below zero, it froze my logger love…
    That’s how I lost my lover and to this cafe I come…
    And here I wait till someone stirs his coffee with his thumb.”

  51. bryonneufeld says:
    Dec 15, 2016 11:00 AM

    However, the outside air temperature doesn’t tell us anything about the temperature of the air INSIDE the ball.
    ————————-

    Well, years of experience tells us that the temperature of the air inside of the football is going to attempt to reach equilibrium with the temperature of the outside air. There isn’t enough thermal protection from the pigskin and the bladder to prevent it.

    In the games that will be played in the cold this weekend, the air pressure inside of the footballs is going to drop. Whether you wish to attribute it to science or magic is up to you.

  52. @almightycabbage & footballfanatic:

    No need for arguing over the notion that the Pats might have dropped balls from 13.5psi to 12.5psi in the restroom and whether this is technically breaking the rules – because it never happened. Walt Anderson says in his pregame inspection that he gauged the Pats’ balls at 12.5 (as Brady likes them) and the Colts’ balls at 13. If you accept all Walt’s testimony as to this and which gauges were used, and the fact that the Pats’ balls were mostly used and tested cold and wet whereas the Colts’ balls were mostly unused and tested warm and dry, then the gas law easily accounts for the differences at half time. Add in the corroborating evidence from the Steelers-Giants game which saw similar drops despite the refs closely guarding and testing all the balls, then there’s no need for crazy theories. Deflategate was a total fraud, as anyone who maintains their own car tires could tell you.

  53. edukator4 says:
    Dec 15, 2016 9:49 AM

    this is what i do not understand. How can balls suddenly be affected by weather? I have been watching football since the mid 80s. I have seen some cold games. I have never heard of the ball losing PSI, let alone so much that would be noticeable, and it went undetected.
    ______________________________________

    Footballs have always been impacted by weather conditions. However it isn’t really noticeable to touch as temperature also has an impact on the material the ball is made of. The material tightens and kickers say that it is like “kicking a rock” because the cold impacts the pliability of the material. It’s the same thing that makes the ball feel slicker in the cold, the small bumps that give the ball texture contract and make the ball harder to grip because the ball is now smoother than when it was at room temperature.

  54. footballfanatic says:
    Dec 15, 2016 11:37 AM

    If Tom’s balllls drop 1.2 psi on average in 50 degree weather, please enlighten me with your ‘common sense’ as to what these footballs sunday will be at in -1 degree weather?????
    ———————–

    Below 12.5PSI

  55. 2016nfcnorthchampiondetroitlions says:
    Dec 15, 2016 8:59 AM
    I have never been rooting this hard for the Bears

    You are proving my point that you are terrified of the Packers and what they are going to do to the Lions!!!

    If the Lions are so good and you are as confident as your moniker indicates, there’s no reason to be scared right????

    Truth is, you are a Lions fan. Your destiny is failure.

  56. mmack66 says:
    Dec 15, 2016 11:50 AM

    Well, years of experience tells us that the temperature of the air inside of the football is going to attempt to reach equilibrium with the temperature of the outside air. There isn’t enough thermal protection from the pigskin and the bladder to prevent it.

    In the games that will be played in the cold this weekend, the air pressure inside of the footballs is going to drop. Whether you wish to attribute it to science or magic is up to you.

    ==================================

    It depends on what the temperature of the air was that was used to inflate the ball initially and how quickly the temperature equilibrium occurs. There are a bunch of factors at play.

    You car tire doesn’t go flat immediately just because it is cold outside. It might take a few days of cold weather to see the warning light come on.

  57. I don’t care where your from or where you play, when it’s that cold out it doesn’t matter. It doesn’t matter if it’s Rodgers back there, they will all struggle. It will be a ground and pound game. Look at what the weather did to Seattle’s offense against the Vikings last year. I’d love to see a stat showing games scores for zero or below games.

  58. oh and to answer your question about about how QB’s cannot know…..peoples’ sense of touch changes with the temperature of their skin and any coverings on their skin. I figured that was common sense, which might have been a bad assumption on my part.

  59. gtodriver says:
    Dec 15, 2016 8:38 AM
    Packer fans have proven they really don’t like cold weather football. They couldn’t sell out Lambeau Field for their last home playoff game.

    They were forced to have a corporate bailout so that the average fan could watch the game at home while sitting on their couch…
    _______________________________

    Really? Wow, if true that’s embarrassing. If the Bills ever manage to get a playoff game at home the good people of Buffalo will be killing each other in the streets for those tickets.

  60. manzoa says:
    Dec 15, 2016 11:31 AM

    Someone please call Al Gore. This has got to be about global warming.
    _________________________________

    Climate and weather are not the same thing.

  61. edukator4 says:
    Dec 15, 2016 9:49 AM

    this is what i do not understand. How can balls suddenly be affected by weather? I have been watching football since the mid 80s. I have seen some cold games. I have never heard of the ball losing PSI, let alone so much that would be noticeable, and it went undetected.

    ——-

    that’s because nobody (meaning the league) cared until the Patriots were accused. and it seems nobody (meaning the league) cares after either.

  62. Let’s hear it from those fans who want to keep open-air stadiums for that “true football feeling.” Be sure to show up for this game and get the thrill of genuine football in the elements

  63. There may well be more Packers fans in attendance than Bear fans.

    The Lions and their fans must be rooting hard for the Bears, knowing that they will certain lose 1, maybe 2 of their next games before Green Bay comes to Detroit.

  64. The ideal gas law says that the ratio of pressure to temperature is constant when temperature is measured on an absolute scale (such as kelvin). So:

    Pressure(cold) = Pressure(warm) * Temperature(cold)/Temperature(warm)

    Assuming the air put into the balls is 75 F (297 K) and the ball is filled to 12.5 psi, when the ball comes into equilibrium with the Chicago 0 F weather (255 K) the pressure will be:

    12.5 psi * 255 K/ 297 K = 10.7 psi

    As an aside, 40 F is 277.5 so:

    12.5 psi * 277.5 K / 297 K = 11.7 psi

  65. I was at that game in 2008. The wind chill was between -17 to -30 during the game with a stiff westerly wind. During halftime EVERYONE on the wind-facing side of the stadium disappeared under the windbreak of the stadium structure. When I sayeveryone, I mean… only 1 or 2 people were still there. It was unreal, and crazy cold.

    This Sunday the winds won’t be that strong, so in my mind, even if the thermometer reads lower than 2008, THAT game will remain the coldest.

  66. I remember as a kid in Detroit in the 50’s and going to the Lions games and freezing my arse off. Hey dad its been three hours and my toes are still frozen is that bad?

    Here in Minny we get severe cold but its not that damp moist cold air like in Detroit. All I know is Chicago will be dam cold on Sunday and that will effect the field and the game. Fun to watch, at home in front of the fire.

  67. the coldest game I ever attended was in Cleveland . 1989 – 37 wind chill factor .

    Battle of Ohio which I sat and watched my beloved Browns lose to the Bungles .

    my beer froze in the cup .

  68. Not only Rodgers…. In cold like that NOBODY can move well….. It certainly evens everything out and it will come down to turnovers, a missed tackle or two and field position…

  69. This is going to be a tough game and the elements favor the Bears. Adverse conditions favor home teams and they favor underdogs and the Bears are both on Sunday. Hope Rodgers can cope with the injuries despite the temperature. The Bears will play all out.

  70. @tpundsack – one problem with your calculations. You used the gauge pressure alone. You have to add atmospheric pressure (14.7) to the gauge pressure before the calculation and then subtract it from the answer to get the final gauge pressure. This is why arm chair scientist like Bill Nye were wrong in their conclusions

  71. Really? Wow, if true that’s embarrassing. If the Bills ever manage to get a playoff game at home the good people of Buffalo will be killing each other in the streets for those tickets.

    No. Thats is false. Made up by Viking fans who have no life beyond this website.

  72. The Packers and Bears have a staggering 22 World Championships combined.

    On the extreme other end of the spectrum are hapless and tasteless teams like the Vikings who have 0 (that’s right – zero). Their futility is equally staggering.

  73. The Bears are having another bad season, maybe a different coach could provide the spark the need? I hear Jeff Fisher is looking for a job. Go pack go!

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