2017 salary cap currently pegged at $166-169 million

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On the surface, the salary cap seems to be an objective, unambiguous formula. In reality, the specific team-by-team spending limit is finalized via back-and-forth negotiations between the NFL and the NFL Players Association.

For 2017, the final number will be announced soon, since each team must be in compliance with it by March 9. Per a source with knowledge of the situation, the cap currently is expected to be in the range of $166 million to $169 million.

Last year, the cap was $155.27 million. In 2015, the cap was $143.28 million. The year before, $133 million. In 2013, it was $123 million.

Prior to that, the cap was going up much more slowly; in 2012, the cap was $120.6 million per team.

The end result, assuming the low end of the currently projected range for 2017, is a total increase of 37.6 percent in only five years. Which means a lot more money for teams to spend — and a lot more money for players to make.

14 responses to “2017 salary cap currently pegged at $166-169 million

  1. My Patriots manage the salary cap better than any other team so no worries whatsover.
    Never overpay and be held hostage by a player who will most likely under perform.
    Mr Bennett likely on his way out of NE.

  2. Funny how people are more turned off the game now with richer players. When you watch Jags, Ten, Clev, NYJ, SF, both LA teams & many, many more. Just because you field a team of a 1%’ers does not mean your team is good!

  3. And this is why Andrew Luck (and a handful of other QB’s) who are actually worth it on these new mega deals aren’t as big of burden as some make it out to be.

  4. yooperman says:
    Nice picture of the true NFL logo.
    —-
    Wow, that was truly deep. I learn something new here every day. Do you mean to tell me that businesses exist to make money, and that large businesses that want to stay relevant over the long haul constantly look for new ways to adapt to changing times and therefore make even more money? Do tell. I had no idea.

  5. RandyinRoxbury says:
    Feb 25, 2017 2:05 PM
    My Patriots manage the salary cap better than any other team so no worries whatsover.
    Never overpay and be held hostage by a player who will most likely under perform.
    Mr Bennett likely on his way out of NE.
    ——————————————-

    The only reason the Patriots are able to manage the cap is because of Tom Brady. He continues to restructure his deals to earn his money up front in bonuses so the cap stays low. It’s a legal way of circumventing the cap. They manage the cap because Tom Brady just wants to win, nothing more. He is 22nd in the NFL in QB cap hit at $14M, which is $14.7M less than the #1 cap hit, Tony Romo.

    When Tom Brady retires, this “manage the cap better than anybody in the NFL” will change dramatically. They won’t be able to just bring in a former Buffalo Bills scrub and use him to blast through the AFC. They’ll actually need playmakers to surround the replacement of Tom Brady.

  6. You’re absolutely correct, gadzod. More than that, Tom Brady isn’t taking pay cuts, he’s restructuring to help himself and the team. He gets less now, creating cap space to get immediate on-field help, while INCREASING the money he gets down the road. Not only will the Pats eventually lose Brady’s skills, leadership and other intangibles, those payments he and the team pushed into the future are going to come due. Then we’ll see how well the Pats manage the cap, especially since I could see a man of Bill Belichick’s age, long list of accomplishments and emotional wear and tear walking away around the same time his quarterback does.

  7. Conspiracy Theory told to me by Dolphins fan:
    Brady has a handshake deal with Kraft to be paid as a “consultant” after he retires to make up for taking less than market value.
    Thumbs up if you believe it.

  8. namingrights says:
    Feb 25, 2017 7:59 PM

    Conspiracy Theory told to me by Dolphins fan:
    Brady has a handshake deal with Kraft to be paid as a “consultant” after he retires to make up for taking less than market value.
    ————————————————————-
    In 2015, Brady’s off-field endorsement income was $7 mil. I’m sure it is higher today.

    So by taking less than he could get from a free agent deal in Cleveland (or some other NFL wasteland), he allows NE to build a better supporting cast, they are competitive every year, win a bunch of SBs and his endorsements go way up.

    Is this really that complicated?

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