Report: Jim Caldwell’s extension gives him a guarantee only through 2018

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Jim Caldwell’s new contract officially can be called as Rextension.

Ian Rapoport of NFL Media reports that the deal secretly signed by Caldwell in the offseason, and disclosed earlier this year guarantees Caldwell’s pay only through 2018, with an option for 2019 and beyond.

It’s a device that has been used on multiple occasions in recent years, creating the illusion of security that doesn’t really exist. For example, the last contract received by former Jets coach Rex Ryan guaranteed only one year beyond 2014 — and he was fired after the 2014 season.

This structure means that a buyout would consist of paying Caldwell for only one year, making it a lot more affordable to move on from a coach whose team has underachieved this year, in relation to its expectations. The last straw may have been last Sunday’s nine-man formation on defense against the Ravens on a third-and-seven play — when Baltimore gained 27 yards. (In the prior game, the Lions had 10 men on the field when the Vikings scored one of their touchdowns.)

As PFT Live co-host Chris Simms mentioned last week (I think we were in a break at the time but who knows?), former NFL coach Bill Parcells used to say that, regardless of how little owners know about football, they can count to 11.

Owners also know whether they team makes it to the playoffs. The Lions, at 6-6, are in danger of not making it. Which puts Jim Caldwell in grave danger of not returning.

20 responses to “Report: Jim Caldwell’s extension gives him a guarantee only through 2018

  1. I would say make DC Teryl Austin the head coach, but some of the blame for these miscommunications has to lay with him as well, although he is in the booth and Caldwell is on the sideline.

    There is some fault for Jim Bob Cooter never being able to establish a running game, some of it must be schematic, TJ Lang and Rick Wagner rank pretty high at their positions by PFF; Reilly Reiff and Larry Warford were here for years and we could never run the ball, they leave and are both starting and contributing to very succesful units in Minnesota and New Orleans.

    There is plenty of fault on Bob Quinn for coming in, saying he was going to rebuild the offensive and defensive line, but failing to produce any kind of success in either of those departments. Football is won in the trenches and the Lions can’t run the ball or stop the run, can’t rush the passer or protect the passer. That tells me they are a long ways away. Need to build effective lines before Stafford’s prime is gone. Whether that’s with Caldwell as coach or not, I don’t really care.

  2. He’s seemed over his head since being named head coach. He’s not the worst coach in the league but I think he’s in the lower half or even lower third. He seems more suited as an assistant coach, due to his temperament. Being a cool customer is one thing but lacking the ability to get fired up and rally the troops seems to be a weakness of his.

  3. Where trying to achieve offensive “balance” is concerned, he was too stubborn for his own good.

    Decent man, great motivator, horrible game manager.

  4. That’s a guarantee that the Lions will still disappoint until at least then.

    Definition of insanity is doing same thing over and over again and expecting a different
    result. Sadly, Detroit is insane.

  5. It should also be noted that, in addition to the limited extension, he will also be entitled to an actual set of working headphones to amuse himself with during the entire games.

  6. Long time Lions fan here,

    The big knock against Caldwell is his loyalty and refusal to make changes. Take, for example, when the Lions started 1-7 in 2015. Opposing teams were talking in the press every other week about how the Lions were tipping their playcalling with their personell groups. But Caldwell refused to make changes or fire Joe Lombardi until team ownership forced him to do so.

    Same thing with this year. Lions, at the very least, need a new oline coach (zero run game, Stafford among most pressured in the league despite Quin bringing in Lang and Wagner). But Caldwell is a stay the course guy.

    Last week the Lions dropped the ball in what was essentially a playoff game for them. I am tired of their underachieving. It’s time to fire Caldwell.

  7. How bad is it in Detroit? Thought last year’s wildcard year was a stepping stone towards better things. Top if off, they were gifted a Rodgers clavicle injury this season and…….the Vikings of all teams were the ones to take advantage of it…..with Keenum as their QB. I think they need to give Stafford more money~

  8. Sounds similar to the illusion used in players’ contracts: “A 5-year contract! Wow, he’s really got it made!!” – only to be cut whenever the team desires. The ONLY important number is the GUARANTEED MONEY.

  9. I think Detroit’s problems go higher than Caldwell or any of the GM’s, coaches they had. What is the only common denominator over the last 60 years?

  10. I liked Caldwell, but face it he is not getting the results like Minnesota and Green Bay. I just hope we don’t become Chicago with a change.

    Josh McDaniels is my best guess at this point

  11. I was one of Caldwell’s biggest supporters on here, since I feel he has brought some stability to the team. Last week opened my eyes a little though, and I do feel like he and the coaching staff have to really step up their game.

    I agree with yooperman that the problems with this franchise over the years go higher than just the staff.

    We have a top QB which most teams would love to have, and we need to build off that foundation to something great, which I feel we can still do in Stafford’s prime years.

  12. firejerry says:

    December 10, 2017 at 8:55 am

    As a Bear fan…..don’t fire him. Let him coach 10 more years!!!

    ———-
    How does it feel to know that a coach as bad as Caldwell has won 6 of 7 vs the Bears.

    And you want the Lions to keep him? Lol Bears fans aren’t bright

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