Favre fears that “tomorrow I may not remember who I am”

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Hall of Fame quarterback Brett Favre played most of his career at a time when the NFL had yet to wake up to the long-term problems associated with head injuries. Which puts Favre among the thousands of former NFL players who may develop cognitive issues later in life.

And Favre is keenly aware of what may come.

“I’m able to function the way I so choose, at least up to this point,” Favre recently told CNN, via TheBigLead.com. “I stay active. . . . Tomorrow may be totally different. Tomorrow I may not remember who I am, I may not know where I live, and that’s the frightening thing for us football players.”

That fear is to be expected. As Dr. McCarthy pointed out more than four years ago in an item posted at Deadspin.com, former players may be unnecessarily freaked out by fears of Chronic Traumatic Encelopathy, feeling that they have a ticking time bomb in their heads when in reality there’s a good chance they don’t, based on the decades of football players from the decades during which the league had no sensitivity to concussions.

The question of Favre’s fear arose in connection with whether he’ll encourage his grandchildren to play football.

“I’m not going to encourage him to play football,” Favre said regarding the oldest grandchild, who is eight. “I’m not saying I would discourage him, but I would be cringing every time I saw my grandson get tackled, because I know, physically, what’s at stake.”

But what if they make the game safer?

“How do you make the game safer?” Favre said. “You don’t play.”

Not playing definitely would make the game safer. However, the NFL has taken steps to make the game reasonably safer, even though it’s impossible to make it entirely safe.

Regardless of the risks, no player can currently claim that he doesn’t know what can happen if he plays football. And very few have chosen to walk away from the game prematurely, even knowing what they now know.

45 responses to “Favre fears that “tomorrow I may not remember who I am”

  1. Its the price you pay to be a legend and a god amongst football imortals. If u dont want the imortality dont get in the ring. Brett favres family will see him for eons in canton.

  2. When I hear stories like this, I feel for these player but let’s be real here. On so many occasions, you have heard guys like Favre make statements like they lied during concussion test so they can continue to play. Now, of course some of it is based on the fact that in the NFL contracts are not guaranteed and not playing would mean a loss in pay but still, these guys walk into stadiums like gladiator and they played like one. you can not expect to always walk away without the lingering effects of what they did to their bodies. from Oklahoma drills, to the 2 a days to the actual game, there is a cumulative effect here. Honestly, I feel for these guys but they too have to take some of the blame for been so reckless with their bodies.

  3. Watch the Documentary, League of Denial…. Rozell knew about this in the 90’s and ruined the Dr that discovered it trying to cover it up.
    The reason was… “The end of Pro Football as it is known”. I didn’t make that up. It is referenced in the movie.
    Brett will be fine. he didn’t take as many shots as Linemen or RB’s and other positions.

  4. This is an honest answer.

    Favre and all his fellow NFLers sacrifice their bodies and their future health for the entertainment of fans. If some players, after retiring, articulate their (justifiable) fears of what the full consequences of this sacrifice could be, it seems we owe them consideration and compassion, not belittlement.

    At least, that’s if we want there to continue be an NFL.

  5. Not sure why there are so many Favre haters. Guy was out there for 300+ games having fun and laying it all out for us to enjoy. He wasn’t perfect but he was as magnificent a football player as there ever was. It’s a tough game and given his amazing streak of games played he was one of the toughest. God bless you Brett.

  6. John Baxter I’d like to say something. I am the wife of a man with 9 vested years in the NFL as an O Lineman. While of course talented and tough enough to make it that far in a brutal, unforgiving sport, he, like so many of his contemporaries, was not a household name like Favre. My husband played in the 70s and 80s when salaries were far lower than post 1993 NFL men. My husband, like so many of his contemporaries, busted his behind and practiced and played through excruciating pain and injury. Because his EMPLOYER, now worth 14billion dollars, treated their EMPLOYEES like disposable gloves – use that product up until wear and tear makes it useless to you. Toss it in the trash and never give it a second thought. After all, plenty more disposable gloves to use up and toss out. Cheap product when you consider the profits being churned out. Fast forward to today. Neurodegenerative illnesses are WIDESPREAD. Contrary to what the Leagues million dollar spin doctors tell the public, the “billion dollar” Concussion settlement is a joke. The NFL and NFLPA have been neglecting and denying and disparaging sick men and their families for DECADES. So, instead of your tired “hey now these guys are partly to blame” mantra, take a hard look at the ELEPHANT in the room – their 14 Billion dollar employer. Please stop being an apologist for the League and give sick guys like my husband a damn break. We’ve already been ignored, blamed and vilified by the League responsible for the horrors many of us find ourselves in today. We don’t need finger pointing from the public. Thanks

  7. Favre is a drama queen.That is GB fault. If you are really good and play QB in GB. The fans adore you so much that you turn into a drama queen. Favre did it and so has Rodgers. Rodgers will be existing there too and it will be ugly when it happens.

  8. He continuously wanted to keep on playing and now that he REALLY can’t keep on playing he’s missing the spotlight and jumping on the football ruined my life bandwagon?

  9. markod52 says:
    February 18, 2018 at 11:47 pm
    Not sure why there are so many Favre haters. Guy was out there for 300+ games having fun and laying it all out for us to enjoy. He wasn’t perfect but he was as magnificent a football player as there ever was. It’s a tough game and given his amazing streak of games played he was one of the toughest. God bless you Brett.

    ___________________________________________________________________________________________

    This post gives me hope that there are still some decent football fans who post in here without resorting to criticism or sarcasm. Great post markod52 and you are 100% correct about Favre. He played the game the way it was meant to be played and in his prime he was the best player — not just QB — in the game. There is not one team in the NFL who wouldn’t have traded their QB for Brett Favre when he was in his prime. He could do more with less than anyone who played during his era.

  10. “Elizabeth Nicholson says:
    February 19, 2018 at 1:55 am”

    Good for you for sticking by Gerry and becoming an advocate…couldn’t have been easy to watch. A 15 second Google search proves 100% percent of her story is accurate.

    If I had any say in the matter, I would take a percentage of every player’s salaries(5 or 10%) and that would go into the fund. An exemption for guys making less than 1M as the bench warmers are usually in/out of this league quickly and need every penny.
    Additionally, I would charge the owners the difference between team salaries and the max cap and that would also go into the fund. If the Browns only spend 80M on a 170M cap year, they would be donating 90M to the fund for retired players.

    5 or 10% is such a small number once you get over the league minimum. Do you really think someone like Jimmy G in San Fran can’t thrive if his 27.5M is cut to 24.75 annually? At approx 500M annually being deposited, this would also provide such a massive bank of money that guys would also get a modest annual retirement so we’ll never see their families or themselves homeless or working at a 24/7 gas station in their 60s.

    It’s so easy to fix this problem, it’s comical. Everyone has to pay a little, so nobody pays the ultimate price. And it provides security for ALL.

    This way both parties pay it semi-equally.

  11. I really have grown tired of the woe-is-me routine of former players. To play football was a choice. Not one was forced into doing so. Every occupation has its own risks.

  12. Favre is on point with saying don’t play if you want it to be safer. Granted there have been improvements to the game, but it’s inherently a violent game by nature and it’s never going to be 100% safe.

    In this day and age, we all know the risks associated with football. It’s still the choice of every individual to take that risk and play, just like a lot of people take risks doing other things in life that aren’t safe.

  13. When he played he forgot which team he played for. No one will ever beat his interception record.

    Are we supposed to feel sorry for guys who made.millions playing football? These guys want to complain now, but they wouldn’t change a thing. Just think, Brett. You could be working construction somewhere and still might develop cognitive issues later in life. Instead, you have millions of dollars, retired at 40 and have it made. If all you have to worry about is the slim chance that you might end up in bad shape, you are way better off than most.

  14. stellarperformance says:
    February 18, 2018 at 11:24 pm
    Vikings fans would like to forget who he was.
    ————————————

    Actually Favre and the Viking fans had a competitive respectful relationship. Not like the spiteful hatred we have for Erin Rodgers. I for one enjoyed watching him play because nobody played all out and left it on the field like he did. Viking fans respected him as a football player who just happened to play QB for the stinking Packers.

  15. Sorry, but I can’t fight the feeling that what Favre is really worried about is that everyone will forget who he is. As others have pointed out, this is a guy who very recently was telling people he felt great and could probably still play.

  16. There have been some players recently who have walked away from football fearing aftereffects. I have a feeling Favre has noticed some symptoms. He played when qb’ s weren’t protected like today.I didn’t even like football till one day I watched him play. I was hooked. Thanks Mr. Favre. Viking season unbelievable!!!

  17. Liberalsruineverything says:
    February 19, 2018 at 9:30 am
    Actually Favre and the Viking fans had a competitive respectful relationship. Not like the spiteful hatred we have for Erin Rodgers. I for one enjoyed watching him play because nobody played all out and left it on the field like he did. Viking fans respected him as a football player who just happened to play QB for the stinking Packers.
    ///////////////////////////////////////////////

    Sure. Everyone believes you. Just know the Packers and theirvfans enjoyed the results of Favres’ tenure in Minnesota every bit as much as the Greeks enjoyed the results of their Trojan Horse in Troy. Similar results too.

  18. My reaction to all players saying these types of things –

    Would you do it over again?

    Beyond ANY reasonable doubt, I don’t think Favre wouldn’t do ANYTHING differently.

    He’d be the last player I suspect would quit with all the risks in mind.

  19. That fear isn’t limited to football players. There are a lot of people who never played sports who get Alzheimer’s or some form of dementia. I went through some of that with my grandmother. So, as sad as it is for football players to deal with those issues, let’s not forget that “normal” people deal with a lot of the same issues. The biggest difference is that football players made the choice to put themselves in harm’s way.

  20. The length that Favre will go to forget that he once wore a purple uniform is behind this excuse. I sure there are worse things in life but right now I cannot think of any.

  21. Actually Favre and the Viking fans had a competitive respectful relationship. Not like the spiteful hatred we have for Erin Rodgers. I for one enjoyed watching him play because nobody played all out and left it on the field like he did. Viking fans respected him as a football player who just happened to play QB for the stinking Packers.

    Oh PUH-leeeze…just stop. You guys hated him and made crap up about him just like you do to Rodgers. If Rodgers walked out of a Green Bay today the Viking fans would the first ones groveling at his feet and offering up their first born so he d play there..spare us all.

  22. I think the NFL will go on a decline. This last year’s ratings drop is indicative that many people are uneasy with watching now that we know that probably 75% of players are getting permanent brain damage. We’ve found that medical science really didn’t yet understand concussions. I don’t watch near as much football. I watched the Super Bowl, and I despise the Patriots and remember yelling Yeah! when Gronk took that big hit. Then I caught myself and thought, I just cheered something that may prevent this man from talking to his grandchildren. Or have him sleeping in an alley like Mike Webster.

  23. Still salty about Favre in purple eh cheeseheads?? Skololol!!!!!
    It’s almost been a decade and you’re still crying.

  24. Frazier28/7 says:
    February 20, 2018 at 10:16 am
    Still salty about Favre in purple eh cheeseheads?? Skololol!!!!!
    It’s almost been a decade and you’re still crying
    ///////////////:/:::///////

    Wrong. It’s about Favre. Not Favre in purple. Favre. That’s it. You’re giving yourselves too much credit. He soured me by selfishly attempting to abandon his own teammates in pursuit of another SuperBowl……for himself. It had nothing to do with the Vikings.

  25. stellarperformance says:
    February 20, 2018 at 3:16 pm
    Frazier28/7 says:
    February 20, 2018 at 10:16 am
    Still salty about Favre in purple eh cheeseheads?? Skololol!!!!!
    It’s almost been a decade and you’re still crying
    ///////////////:/:::///////

    Wrong. It’s about Favre. Not Favre in purple. Favre. That’s it. You’re giving yourselves too much credit. He soured me by selfishly attempting to abandon his own teammates in pursuit of another SuperBowl……for himself. It had nothing to do with the Vikings.
    —————————

    You right and wrong. He didn’t abandon anyone, the Packers abandoned him by shipping him to the Jets and undermining where he he actually wanted to play. The Vikings needed a QB and he wanted to stick it to the Packers just like they stuck it to him. Can’t wait until things go south with little Erin and watch you cheesers turn on him even quicker than you turned on Favre.

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