LSU’s Donte Jackson runs through calf cramp, gets a 4.32-second 40

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LSU cornerback Donte Jackson boasted before the Scouting Combine that he thought he could break the record for the fastest 40-yard dash. He didn’t quite do that this morning, but he did put on an impressive show.

Jackson’s first 40 time was unofficially 4.32 seconds, which doesn’t break Jon Ross‘s record of 4.22 but does register as the fastest 40 so far at this year’s Combine.

And Jackson did that despite looking a little awkward on his start. He told NFL Network afterward that he was running through a calf cramp.

Jackson was on LSU’s track team, where he ran a 10.22-second 100-meter dash. Even before the Combine he was viewed as a potential first-round draft pick, and his fast 40 today should strengthen his draft position.

15 responses to “LSU’s Donte Jackson runs through calf cramp, gets a 4.32-second 40

  1. Just chuckling to myself about all the unofficial, self-proclaimed 4.3 40 times I’ve heard about from rando people as we watch these supremely talented guys fairly rarely crack that number. A buddy of mine who’s a marine always tells me about how funny it is that half the people he talks to feel the need to say something like “yeah, I almost enlisted too, but then…[insert excuse].” I played semipro ball, and that’s just Pop Warner for grown up has-beens and never-was’es, and I can’t even begin to tell you how many people I talked to about it had to qualify themselves to me with stories of what a great athlete they used to be in high school, and anybody who was fast automatically ran a 4.3. How the NFL scouts managed to miss all these guys is beyond me. Relax, Al Bundy…Polk High will never forget your 4 TDs in the City Championship.

  2. “where he ran a 10.22-second 100-meter dash.”

    I’m not sure how many of you watch track or have any clue what that means – but I cannot emphasize enough how exceptionally fast that is. Much more impressive than any 40. Chris Johnson/Bo/John Ross ran 4 second whatevers – but they would absolutely get smoked in the 100 from a guy running a 10.2 100. Also please save the rebuttals along the lines of “BUT THAT DOESN’T MEAN HE CAN PLAY FOOTBAWWWWW.” Yes, I am aware of this. It’s not original/illuminatiing/enlightening. Quite literally everyone in the entire world knows this.

  3. So he can run, is that good for when he gets burned by a WR? Can he play the ball and use his speed after an Interception? I think I am looking for cover ability in a CB. What drills do they have at the combine to showcase that?

  4. Some guys run slow times, but end up being pro bowlers. Some guys run fast, but can’t play football. This kid is a football player. The bad news is that the teams that were hoping to steal him in the second round, probably won’t be able to now.

  5. 10.22 100m = a 9.345 100 yards…
    spectacular for a football player not named Bob Hayes (10.06 100 m Olympic final Tokyo 1964 world record) Bob Hayes changed the NFL, forced the adaptation of Zone coverage

  6. i always believe in the LSU savages. stats show that its been the best place at developing nfl talent for 20 years now. but donte jackson is iffy. hes one of those dudes who stares down the qb hunting the big pick only to get beat bad.

  7. Stu Bidaciou says:
    March 5, 2018 at 10:46 am
    So he can run, is that good for when he gets burned by a WR? Can he play the ball and use his speed after an Interception? I think I am looking for cover ability in a CB.

    What drills do they have at the combine to showcase that?
    ——————–
    It’s called game film, that’s what they have to showcase their football skills. Let the combine be what it is, it’s meant to show the athletic ability and a benchmark. Not saying the combine is most important, it’s obviously not, but it has it’s own purpose. If you want to see a CB’s cover skills then watch in-game film. Anyone can look good in practice drills, real games are what real scouts look at.

  8. Stories like this are hard to know the truth. Did he have an issue, or did he just make up an excuse? It reminds me of playing baseball growing up. When I was on the “little league” sized field, the last year before we were moved up to the adult sized field, there was one pitcher in the league that just had arm strength that was advanced for the size of the field. He was virtually unhittable when you factor in the distance to the mound, his arm strength/pitch velocity, etc. But for some reason, that was the height of his arm development. When we moved up to the adult field, his arm didn’t get stronger. So he was still an ok pitcher, and usually was successful the first time through the order. But without fail, sometime in the area of the 3-5 inning, the opposing team would string together a number of hits, and score a bunch of runs, and at some point he would throw a wild pitch, and drop to his knees on the mound, grabbing his shoulder like his arm was just ripped off and he’d never throw a ball again… Of course 3 days later he was all healed up and ready to go.

  9. Yeah, John Ross ran a 4.22 and look how much good that did him. Renaldo Nehemiah was fast too. Just because he’s fast doesn’t mean he can play in the NFL.

  10. shogunassasin30 says:Chris Johnson/Bo/John Ross ran 4 second whatevers – but they would absolutely get smoked in the 100 from a guy….

    Not sure what planet you are from but Bo was insanely fast (10.39 at Auburn at ~50# heavier). He ran a legit sub 4.2 and given that he was 50 pounds or so bigger than Donte – it wouldn’t matter if he could catch him anyway (sometime after the first 40 yards) as Bo would have run his a** over.

  11. Lol people want to know if he was making it up or not? Listen, he runs a 10.2, rumor has it, he was one of those guys who had the prospects of running a sub 4.3. My friend trained with him during the offseason at Michael Johnson’s Performance Academy and can verify that Jackson could flat out fly.

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