Allen tweet story underscores the high stakes of the draft

AP

The NFL draft is a dirty, nasty, competitive business. With millions riding on the differences between picks at the top of the process and with teams hoping players they covet will fall into their laps, there are many reasons to try to make someone look bad — and to do so as close in time to the start of the process as possible.

Dolphins tackle Laremy Tunsil experienced that two years ago, when video of Tunsil smoking marijuana through a gas-mask bong surfaced during the draft after someone hacked his social media accounts. Quarterback Josh Allen is experiencing that now.

Apart from the issues raised by offensive high-school era tweets from Allen (and the lessons to be learned from that by stupid, ignorant kids who will tend to do stupid, ignorant things) is the question of who found them, who leaked them to the media, and why they were published within the 24-hour bubble before the draft.

It could have been the agent representing another player who could be picked instead of Allen at any of the spots where Allen could be picked. It could have been a team that wants Allen to be available when that team picks. It could have been an old enemy from the small town Allen grew up in who is hoping to stick it to him as he prepares to embrace the NFL limelight.

Regardless, these stories of stupid, ignorant tweets from stupid, ignorant kids will continue to emerge, and the lesson to the less stupid and less ignorant (hopefully) young adults is clear: Get smart and clean up your social-media accounts. As Gantt noted earlier, it’s a lesson that any player represented by a competent agent shouldn’t have to figure out on his own; the competent agent should be doing the same research that whoever wants to make Allen look bad did in finding the stupid, ignorant tweets of a stupid, ignorant kid.

22 responses to “Allen tweet story underscores the high stakes of the draft

  1. And redundantly calling him a “stupid, ignorant kid” is really helping.

    Plenty of non stupid, non ignorant kids that don’t tweet out stupid, ignorant things.

  2. Teams will evolve to not concern themselves with the acts of pre-college teens. Kids will be kids, most are not even remotely considering a life as an NFL player at age 16 and they don’t realize that the internet isn’t as annonymus as they think. As long as the player has been relatively well behaved in college when they are actually preparing to become a pro athlete then we shouldn’t care. If Josh Allen was tweeting those things last weekend, then we have a problem.

  3. Much more than that it underscores how low we have stooped as a society. We will literately judge anyone for anything at any time to make ourselves feel better about ourselves. We have become the equivalent of the jr high mean girls table in the cafeteria.

  4. So the lesson here is hide your racism? I for one am glad these were “unearthed”. It doesn’t matter what age, I was always held accountable for my words and actions. Only in today’s society is it acceptable to do and say what you want and find an excuse later. Stop it.

  5. While saying dumb and racist stuff on social media is a bad idea for ANYONE (let alone a potential pro football player), I’d be more annoyed to find a bunch of pictures of Allen’s dinner all over his Facebook and Instagram.

  6. There are parts of adolescent brains that do not fully develop until, sometimes, into your 20s. One of those parts is what controls a person’s ability to properly assess consequences for actions. So when a parent says “What were you thinking?”, many times, we weren’t, because we did not yet have that ability.

    While I am not willing to wholesale discredit anything a person said until they are 20, it does put into perspective that we are talking about persons who are not yet fully formed – emotionally, intelligently, and biologically.

  7. sportoficionado says:
    April 26, 2018 at 10:07 am

    So the lesson here is hide your racism? I for one am glad these were “unearthed”. It doesn’t matter what age, I was always held accountable for my words and actions. Only in today’s society is it acceptable to do and say what you want and find an excuse later. Stop it.
    ===================================================================================
    What planet are you from? What you say here is the opposite of what happens today. People get destroyed for every little thing today, thanks to idiots on social media. Everybody today is hyper sensitve and feels the need to protest everything.

  8. *cringe* he was using it in the way that black people use it with friends. He probably wasn’t intending to be racist, but wow. Big mistake.

    Even at 15-16 years old you should know better than that. Especially for a kid who grew up with social media.

  9. I’m sorry, but no.

    “Allen tweet story underscores the consequences of social media”

    THAT is the core of this story. The draft is a detail of it.

  10. Agent: “Here’s your new phone with a new email attached to it. We have set up new, verified, Twitter, Facebook and Instagram accounts connected to this email and phone only. Delete all of your old social media. We will be handling all of your social media until you sign a contract.”

  11. sportoficionado says:
    April 26, 2018 at 10:07 am

    So the lesson here is hide your racism? I for one am glad these were “unearthed”. It doesn’t matter what age, I was always held accountable for my words and actions. Only in today’s society is it acceptable to do and say what you want and find an excuse later. Stop it.

    ================

    No, only in today’s society do we experience things like this far removed from their proper context of time, place, and circumstances, and judge it based on our here & now ideals.

    Hip-hop culture has driven this language into the mainstream. Of course it’s unacceptable in larger society or in specifically racist contexts, but our culture can’t have it both ways. Use it as a marketing tool and then feign outrage when random kids use it in their everyday lives in the exact same sense that pop stars and TV/movie celebrities do.

    The hypocrisy is ours.

  12. mumfio:

    Correlation does not imply causation. Social media just adds visibility and makes it easier to criticize today from a far and makes it appear that there is more accountability. That is incorrect. The accountability comes from an individual’s personal experience, growth and overall makeup and character. Not just 140 characters.

  13. This isn’t as bad as the false moral outrage over Mitt Romney supposedly bullying a kid in high school in the 1960’s.

  14. sportoficionado says:
    April 26, 2018 at 11:39 am

    mumfio:

    Correlation does not imply causation. Social media just adds visibility and makes it easier to criticize today from a far and makes it appear that there is more accountability. That is incorrect. The accountability comes from an individual’s personal experience, growth and overall makeup and character. Not just 140 characters.
    =========================================================================================================
    The individual’s personal experience is influenced by social media. The outrage & protests we see today didn’t exist prior to social media. A President gets elected and rather than people just accept that their candidate didn’t win, they take a protest to the streets. People need to “win” or get their way or point of view. Millennials seem to be poor losers.

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