Lamar Jackson: Ravens are getting a Super Bowl out of me

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Quarterback Lamar Jackson had a long wait before hearing his name called on Thursday night and that left a lot of time to contemplate a lot of things.

Jackson said one of them was whether he was going to have to come back to AT&T Stadium on Friday wearing the same green suit he wore on Thursday night because he only brought one of them with him to Dallas. The Ravens traded up to No. 32 in order to snag Jackson, which made the sartorial question a moot one and left Jackson focused on other matters.

“They’re going to get a Super Bowl out of me,” Jackson told Deion Sanders of NFL Media after being introduced as the final pick of the first round.

The Ravens have already said that Jackson’s immediate role will be to develop behind Joe Flacco, something that Jackson said he embraces in another interview on Thursday night.

“I want to learn a lot,” Jackson said. “A guy who wins the Super Bowl, he’s the GOAT to me. I look up to him, just want to learn a lot from his experience and how he led his team.”

Jackson will head to Baltimore for a formal introduction to the team and a chance to start working toward that Super Bowl he plans to bring to town.

65 responses to “Lamar Jackson: Ravens are getting a Super Bowl out of me

  1. He didn’t just win a superbowl, he was MVP and put together the best postseason run football has ever seen. He’s done now, but he and RG3 will prepare this guy properly. Tomlin and BB are retiring after this year to save face.

  2. terripet says:
    April 27, 2018 at 9:09 am
    Did you hit the snooze button

    ———–

    The sad truth is that this kid has a better chance of winning a SB than Andrew Luck

  3. Best of luck to him, as he has the potential to be a game changer. I am sure Flacco is FAR less pleased by this, but it’s a business and Flacco has been overpaid for a few years now, based on one good postseason run.

  4. He couldn’t learn Petrino’s Erhardt-Perkins “pro-offense” system at Louisville. Petrino specifically said he moved away from his traditional offense to fit Jackson’s talents. He incorporated more spread elements along with basic run-and-shoot vertical concepts which Jackson was very good at.

    However, all the EP sets where anticipation and accuracy was important, Jackson was incredibly bad. His reads were mostly wrong and even when he picked the correct receiver, his passes were off-target (ie not hitting the “spot”).

  5. Congratulations to Josh Allen on being the #7 pick in the draft and a new millionaire.

  6. People are going to snicker but when you a draft a guy at the most important on the field what’s wrong with a little swagger and confidence? At least it’s more exciting than the admirably humble but boring ol standard of “I’m just going to come in and work hard”

  7. Its possible he makes good on that, only time will tell. As a Patriots fan I do like what they got (because the loss of Lewis did concern me) but I was of the mindset they should consider grabbing this guy when he was still available at 31. Not because I think Brady is done but because I am sure he has 2+ years in him and I would like to see a guy with good talent and 2+ years of understudy waiting in the wings.

    If Jackson does emerge as a force I will have to acknowledge a Belichick mistake. (Unless we wind up with the next Barry Sanders or something but that would be freak) Only time will tell.

  8. I like this kid….you know he was dissapointed in the green room BUT he NEVER led on…he was joking around and having a good time in the moment. I bet he has good career.

  9. No they aren’t. Period.
    Kaep got lucky cause the league wasnt ready for the “super athletic, 1 read QB” but now every team knows how to beat that/him.
    Sorry but dumb QBs who cant read Ds dont fare well in “the Show”

  10. birdmantd says:
    April 27, 2018 at 9:19 am
    People are going to snicker but when you a draft a guy at the most important on the field what’s wrong with a little swagger and confidence?
    ======

    Nothing. Nothing at all. So why did everyone kill Josh Rosen last night when he said the teams that didn’t draft him would regret it?

  11. The fact that he thinks Flacco is the GOAT casts doubt on his decision making abilities. Perhaps he confused Baltimore with Annapolis and thought Flacco was the mascot.

  12. wow… I love a kid who can dream…but saying it out loud before your first ever real NFL snap…well that is just plain foolish…

    So glad NE didn’t pick this kid.

  13. I don’t know what the young man’s future will be. But instead of staring into his smart phone with an over-entitled, sour milk look on his face while he waited to be called, he seemed to be enjoying the moment with (apparent) family members.

    How can you root against that?

  14. It probably would have been better for Lamar to go in the second round because he would get to free agency sooner. But I’m happy for him that he didn’t have to come back a second day.

  15. All these NE and Pitt fans are scared because they know that their teams defense can’t defend him

  16. He couldn’t learn Petrino’s Erhardt-Perkins “pro-offense” system at Louisville.
    ————-
    He couldn’t learn eh? He set every QB record in Louisville history. Won the Heisman. 2 time first team all american. At times we was simply unstoppable. It’s Louisville. Not exactly a powerhouse. Couldn’t learn? Yeah he was terrible.

  17. OMG shutup Lamar.
    Sign your contract, practice, win a game, win your division and maybe THEN you can squawk about a Super Bowl.

  18. akira554 says:
    April 27, 2018 at 9:15 am

    He couldn’t learn Petrino’s Erhardt-Perkins “pro-offense” system at Louisville. Petrino specifically said he moved away from his traditional offense to fit Jackson’s talents. He incorporated more spread elements along with basic run-and-shoot vertical concepts which Jackson was very good at.

    However, all the EP sets where anticipation and accuracy was important, Jackson was incredibly bad. His reads were mostly wrong and even when he picked the correct receiver, his passes were off-target (ie not hitting the “spot”).
    —————————

    But thats the thing that Belichick, Jim Harbaugh, Pedersen and even Mike Shanahan have proven. You tailor the offense to the players, not force your players to run ‘YOUR SYSTEM FOOTBAW RABBLE RABBLE!’ Belichick has CONSTANTLY evolved his offenses to fit the players he’s able to get. Got Randy Moss? Throw deep as hell and let him get it. Got 2 of the top 5 TE’s in the league? Let them run over the middle and throw intermediate passes. Got a great pass catching RB? Let him catch short stuff.

    Doug Pedersen changed the offense on the fly to fit Nick Foles. He didn’t try to force Foles to do the things that Wentz was doing because he can’t do it. To say that Jackson couldn’t do the things that another QB could, so the offense had to be tailored to him is NOT a knock. Especially when he EXCELLED AT IT! Its not like he was awful no matter what. Jim Harbaugh was successful with Alex Smith and Colin Kaepernick. Belichick has been successful with Brady, Cassell, Garropolo and Brisset. Shanahan was VERY successful with RG3 until RG3 decided that he didn’t want to do the things he was good at anymore, against Shanahans better judgement. Its when you get people like Chip Kelly or even Mike Martz. They have good success with a certain set of players, but thats because those players could run the system. But the coaches thought it was all the system, not the players. If it was as simple as copying the system, everyone would be doing what the Pats have done for the past 20 years, except what gets lost is that the Pats have run 10 different offenses over 20 years and even more defensive schemes.

    Now, can John Harbaugh/Marty Mornhenwig do this? It remains to be seen, but to say that the offense needed to be tailored to Jackson is not a bad thing. How do you think Tom Brady would perform running the offense that Russell Wilson succeeds in? How would Marcus Mariota do if he was forced into Phillip Rivers’ playbook? Put your players in a position to succeed. That seems to be lost on a LOTS of football coaches somehow.

  19. I think my seven year old pretty much summed up how I and everyone else outside of Baltimore feels. “Lamar Jackson is my second favorite college player. The Ravens now have the privilege of moving from my 25th favorite team to my 20th favorite team”

  20. Sorry, but … no. No need to get into why, but it’s not gonna happen. Maybe if he converts to a receiver or something, sure.

  21. I love it when people who have been in the league for 18 years promise a SB win – and lose.

    The kid is confident. He won a well-deserved Heisman. What do you want him to say? The cliche “I just want to come in and work hard?” I want a baller and someone with a little swagger.

  22. pftcancer says:
    April 27, 2018 at 10:25 am
    Only one Super Bowl?
    —————-

    Yeah, because he didn’t wind up going to the Patriots after all.

  23. Honestly I thought this was one of the better moves in the first round. Flacco is very expensive and has been average since his SB run. At this point, they can move on in one year from him. Jackson is very ahtletic, a smart passer and a playmaker. Moving back up into the 1st gives them the 5th year option and allows them cap relief with a possible franchise QB to retool around.

  24. I think they wasted a pick getting this guy. Sure, he’s great in college but I don’t think his skills are going to translate in the NFL. I could be wrong but I think they will regret drafting him.

  25. Lamar, calm down. At least complete ONE pass in a Ravens uniform – in practice – before barking about being the Ravens starting QB and win the super bowl. Calm down.

  26. HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAAHAHAHAHAH

    whew I needed a good laugh.

  27. exinsidetrader says:
    April 27, 2018 at 9:36 am
    Flacco is the GOAT to him? Someone please check him for brain trauma.

    —————————

    Give the kid a break. He’s just trying to flatter Joe in the hope that he might actually accept him as the Ravens QB of the future and take him under his wing (but probably won’t).

  28. Jackson is nothing like RGIII, and the Terrelle Pryor comparison must’ve come from a blind man. Unlike the majority of quarterbacks in this draft, Jackson played in a pro-style system which featured a lot of RPOs, something that’s become huge in the NFL. He ran that offense to a tee without much talent around him and his accuracy issues are overblown, a lot of drops led to his completion percentage. If you watched film on him, you’d probably think he was extremely good and NFL ready. If you didn’t, you’ll probably have to resort to baseless opinions.

  29. jahbrohknee says: “But thats the thing that Belichick, Jim Harbaugh, Pedersen and even Mike Shanahan have proven. You tailor the offense to the players, not force your players to run ‘YOUR SYSTEM FOOTBAW RABBLE RABBLE!’ Belichick has CONSTANTLY evolved his offenses to fit the players he’s able to get.”

    ——————————–

    Funny you should bring up Belichick. His offense has ALWAYS been the Erhardt-Perkins, REGARDLESS of the personnel grouping. McDaniels (and former OC O’Brien and Weis) just runs different plays from the SAME playbook, but still using the primary concepts that make Erhardt-Perkins so successful.

    Randy Moss was actually very good at the EP option route reads, while other WR imports like Chad Johnson, Reggie Wayne, Joey Galloway, David Terrell all failed miserable and washed out.

    As for the two TE set with Gronkowski & Hernandez, it was the E-P system that allowed them the freedom to alter the route based on the defense, with the quarterback in full sync with the read and in anticipation of where they’re going.

  30. Jackson is probably in the best position with the Ravens who aren’t a dumpster fire like the guys on other teams.

  31. factschecker says: “He couldn’t learn eh? He set every QB record in Louisville history. Won the Heisman. 2 time first team all american. At times we was simply unstoppable. It’s Louisville. Not exactly a powerhouse. Couldn’t learn? Yeah he was terrible.”
    ———————-

    As I said, most of Jackson’s Louisville success was from non-pro sets incorporated into the offense. The actual pro-style offense that Petrino normally teaches (modified version of Erhardt-Perkins), Jackson was absolutely horrible at. There’s a reason Petrino had to move away from that system – Jackson was incapable of learning it. Which is the PROBLEM moving to the NFL.

  32. td30 says:
    April 27, 2018 at 11:35 am
    I’m rooting for him. I’m in dire need of seeing an exciting QB playing the game

    —————-

    I’ll take a winning QB over and exciting one any day.

  33. Patriots and Steelers have changed their offense every single year to match their players. Forget about concepts or scheme trees. They abandon the entire playbook to try and stay ahead of the league every year. Jackson can run any scheme and cause problems because he has talent that Brady or Bathroom Stall Ben never had. Get scared.

  34. All these NE and Pitt fans are scared because they know that their teams defense can’t defend him

    I get a little less worried when I see a comment like that.

  35. akira554 says:
    April 27, 2018 at 9:15 am
    He couldn’t learn Petrino’s Erhardt-Perkins “pro-offense” system at Louisville. Petrino specifically said he moved away from his traditional offense to fit Jackson’s talents. He incorporated more spread elements along with basic run-and-shoot vertical concepts which Jackson was very good at.

    However, all the EP sets where anticipation and accuracy was important, Jackson was incredibly bad. His reads were mostly wrong and even when he picked the correct receiver, his passes were off-target (ie not hitting the “spot”).

    64 26 Rate This
    ————————-

    That’s why he was NEVER really on the Pats radar.

    Baltimore loves dumb players. Loves them.

  36. Unitas was drafted in the 9th round by Pittsburgh and cut in training camp. He played sandlot for a year and then the Colts called. He had Ewbank for a coach and he did ok.

    Starr was drafted in the 20th (?) round. Lombardi came to town and the two hit if off perfectly – much TOO perfectly for an ex BALTIMORE Colts fan. (Indy be damned!!)

    Montana was drafted in the 3rd round and he and the coach whose name I can’t remember hit it off perfectly.

    Brady – 6th round, #199 – we all know the story.

    Yada yada yada

    The point is this – no matter where a QB is drafted if he doesn’t wind up with the right coach you’ll never know how good he/they could have been.

    True yesterday, true today, true tomorrow.

  37. I don’t know anything the scouts do, but this guy to my untrained eye looks like a weapon if everything works out. Huge upside might be worth it considering other QB’s drafted every year are a gamble. Besides, every QB talks big. That’s what a team wants in a draft pick.

  38. He seems very likable, but that isn’t what makes you a quality quarterback in the NFL. It was a wasted pick by the Ravens. As happens every year, people will angrily argue for him now, and in two years you won’t be able to find a single person who says they believed he would be a superstar.

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