Report: NFL tweaking ejection language in new helmet rule

AP

The NFL is tweaking the ejection language in the new rule outlawing lowering the head to initiate contact with the helmet, Mark Maske of the Washington Post reports. Ejections by on-field officials will be subject to replay review, but owners must approve the replay component.

The NFL began a two-day player-safety summit Tuesday with owners, coaches, game officials, former players and a representative of the NFL Players Association.

The NFL ratified the safety rule five weeks ago. Everyone still is trying to figure out what type of play exactly officials will throw a flag. The most egregious violations are subject to ejection.

“That’s what I came here for,” Chargers Coach Anthony Lynn said during a break in Tuesday’s meeting, via Maske. “I want to know how the officials are going to officiate this in real speed. We’re sitting here watching all this stuff on video, and that’s easy. I’ve asked six times, ‘Can you rewind that back?’ Well, they [officials] don’t have that option on the field. I just want to see how they’re going to do it — the language and how we’re going to do this and how they’re going to officiate it when it’s full speed on the field.”

NFL officials have not said how often they expect the new rule to come into play. But Maske reports that the league said during the meeting that based on game video from last season they found about five violations per game of the new rule. That doesn’t mean, of course, officials will see all five considering the speed of the game.

Officials attending the meeting told participants they were confident they could spot violations in the open field.

Video of four plays of egregious violations was shown to participants Tuesday, according to Maske. The plays subject to the new rule included Bears linebacker Danny Trevathan‘s on Packers receiver Davante Adams and Bengals safety George Iloka‘s hit on Steelers receiver Antonio Brown.

“This is another challenge to get it taught better,” Falcons coach Dan Quinn said. “There’s definitely plays . . . that, ‘OK, that play needs to leave [the sport], and that play needs to leave.’ Maybe if we start with those plays first to say the egregious fouls [must be addressed], then it’ll kind of trickle itself down.”

42 responses to “Report: NFL tweaking ejection language in new helmet rule

  1. Its pretty simple;

    Hit a guy in the helmet, you’re ejected.

    The only thing there should be debate to be had is, how many helmet-to-helmet hits can a guy administer before he is BANNED for life?

  2. This is going to ruin the game… among other things. There is obviously a fan base for a league that would return football bcak to the rules from 15 years ago, about the time the NFL started monkeying up every little thing.

  3. Maybe the refs can call about 5 of these helmet rule penalties per game, but since I’m sure the NFL doesn’t want to add 5 more penalties to every game, pissing off the fans, maybe they can call less of those ticky-tack defensive holding penalties, when a cornerback gives a gentle shove in the back to a wide receiver one yard past the allotted 5 yard limit for contact.

  4. Its pretty simple; Hit a guy in the helmet, you’re ejected. -_____________________________________________

    Thats exactly why the NEVER PLAYED AT THIS LEVEL bozos cant get new rule changes without “seeing” it in real time. ANY player who competed at any high level football (not highschool or “pro” touch-tackle,” etc) is well aware that EVERY PLAY has SEVERAL helmet to helmet collisions.

  5. aarons444 says:
    May 1, 2018 at 6:40 pm
    Its pretty simple;

    Hit a guy in the helmet, you’re ejected.

    The only thing there should be debate to be had is, how many helmet-to-helmet hits can a guy administer before he is BANNED for life?
    ————–
    You are kidding right?
    Watch one game from 2017 and try to determine how many “lead with the helmet hits” occur in a game.
    Then, count how many players will be left to play after all the ejections.

  6. The NFL is seriously trying to make sure one of the other leagues succeed… seriously 5 per game ffs grow up
    Everyone is aware of the dangers

  7. Just use the same rule as college.

    No targeting the head.

    Leave it to the media to spin things in a hundred different directions.

  8. A whole lot of crying about the Cincinnati Bengals.

    If you are going to cry and complain about the team’s “violence”…

    it’s time to include an accurate moniker…

    THE NFL’S TOUGHEST, MOST DANGEROUS TEAM.

  9. Andddd there goes the excitement I had for this upcoming season. Now I will be annoyed at the penalties every other play. Ughhh. And where it’s called on one but not the other team. And when it’s the reason a team happens to lose a game. Here we go again…

  10. .
    so a QB sneak is leading with the head and your QB gets ejected…
    a Running back diving for the first down is leading with the head, so your RB gets ejected…
    everyone diving for a ball is leading with their head so a pile of guys get ejected…

    pathetic. get rid of Thursday games

  11. Every running back lowers his head before initiating contact.
    Every defensive player lowers his head before initiating contact.

    If you do NOT lower your head, you WILL get a neck injury.

    The NFL has not clearly defined what is allowed and what is not. They have shown a few videos, but there is no clear definition. I am reminded of Justice Potter Stewart’s “I know it when I see it” definition of obscenity.

    This is a stupid rule that cannot possibly be enforced uniformly. It just gives the officials a way to determine the outcome of games, or to hinder one team so as the game can be competitive.

  12. The Iloka hit on Brown that they were so disturbed about that after they suspended him they decided to go back and rescind The suspension? Now they are saying the they really need to punish that kind of hit more.
    Is anyone else here confused?

  13. stellarperformance says:
    May 1, 2018 at 8:32 pm
    Get rid of helmets altogether. Not too many heads would get lowered.
    ——————————-
    That brings the nfl full circle.
    The reason why the helmet was created was for safety.
    Now the helmet is unsafe.
    It’s insane.

  14. Hopefully they’ll make the rules as clear as what designates what a catch is, because that is so crystal clear that…..OK, I can’t keep typing without laughing my arse off.

  15. I’m not sure the sky is really falling. In rugby for example, it is illegal to contact the ball carrier above the armpits (doesn’t matter if you are leading with your shoulder or not) and the tackler must wrap up (no flying in like a missile with your arms tucked into your sides).

    So yes, some big hits that used to be legal will be phased out. Yet nobody seems to think rugby is for the faint of heart, so perhaps freak athletes trying to form-tackle each other will still be interesting.

    Rugby and football are very different obviously so I’m not trying to say I’m comparing apples to apples. But still, the lack of anything that resembles a practiced form when football players tackle could use some work (in many instances at least). Remember when they added facemasks to the helmet? Remember when they later introduced the facemasking penalty? Life went on. It will be ok.

  16. There will be a ton of penalties called in the pre-season and everyone will be in an uproar about how this new rule will ruin the game. Once the regular season starts, the refs will tone it down and only call the most egregious of these fouls (maybe 1-3 per game). A few players will get ejected, just to set an example and to show that the refs are doing their job. By the end of the season, that penalty being called will be about as prevalent as the horse collar penalty. It will happen once in a while but not really thought about too much.

  17. I think the rule is aimed at the “spearing” by the tackler … not the helmet to helmet (in the trenches) that we see on every play …

    College officials do a great job eliminating the spearing, helmet on helmet contact with tackling. They seem to call it if they think they see it and let the replay booth sort it out. Many times the flag is over-ruled when the play is viewed in slo-mo. It does take a little time, but they get the call right more times than not… and over time the ejections are becoming far fewer as the way players tackle is altered.

    It does seem that the NFL is resisting adopting a rule already in place at the “little-brother” college level. If the league truly wants to eliminate spearing, just adopt the rule and then review it as time (years) goes on.

    We all love the violence in the game, absolutely …. but probably agree we don’t want to see a player paralyzed for life … or a football career ended prematurely.

    .

  18. No more qb sneaks and you can only pass on the goal line, no running plays inside the 2 yard line. From watching film extensively I have concluded that most helmet to helmet collisions occur on running plays in short yardage situations. So expand that to third and short as well, anywhere on the field. I mean, in the name of safety, it’s only right.

  19. 5 offenses that could have been possibly called in game is going to turn into at least 8 called offenses this year. book it.

  20. It will be impossible for this to be called in a way that people see as fair, and it’s vague enough that some refs will call it strict, others won’t call it at all, and at some point during the season (probably a playoff game) it’ll help John Mara stop an opponents drive…

  21. What a debacle this is going to be. The NFL is on the verge of becoming unwatchable. Now we’ll have even more games decided by arbitrary, wildly inconsistent penalty flags.

  22. It’s simple. Play without helmets like rugby players and just watch how much more careful players will get with head shots all of the sudden. Real easy to be brave wearing armor.

  23. Pads give players a very false sense of security. Reduce the pads and the helmet. They will start to realize how unprotected they really are. The hits will turn into form tackles and concussions will cease.

  24. PFTers, i think some of you are not appreciating the scope of the rule change. This rule change is not limited to helmet to helmet contact. This rule bans lowering a players helmet to initiate contact with their helmet anywhere on an opponent, not just to an opponent’s helmet.

  25. coloradocowboy says:
    May 1, 2018 at 8:24 pm
    Every running back lowers his head before initiating contact.
    Every defensive player lowers his head before initiating contact.

    If you do NOT lower your head, you WILL get a neck injury.

    The NFL has not clearly defined what is allowed and what is not. They have shown a few videos, but there is no clear definition. I am reminded of Justice Potter Stewart’s “I know it when I see it” definition of obscenity.

    This is a stupid rule that cannot possibly be enforced uniformly. It just gives the officials a way to determine the outcome of games, or to hinder one team so as the game can be competitive.

    —————————————————————-

    Uhhhh, yeah. That’s the whole point of this player safety summit. To explain and show examples of the new rule. It will then be explained to the players during training camp. I’m sorry that the NFL didn’t provide you with the specifics of the rule prior to discussing it with their employees.

  26. i have a solution …… only have the offenses out on the field ….. you know, like last years Super Bowl.

  27. Charger coach Lynn was vocal because he wants a stronger running game. This rule will clearly effect it. Teams will now look for ‘upright’ running backs: e.g. Eric Dickerson. There will be more emphasis on the passing game to avoid penalties. Good for Rivers, Brady, Rogers, Brees. This may well extend their playing life as the league becomes more pass-happy! This is another problem for Goodell, who has a boatload of ’em.

  28. Would lowering your head to initiate contact be something like Malcolm Jenkins did to Brandin Cooks in the SB….ah…ya….it would be. In fact, it’s a perfect example of it…

    But no penalty call. Wait, no penalty call on that obvious penalty/ “How could this be?” , you ask.

    With Fraudger working the puppet strings of the “officials” in that SB, it further proves there was no way New England was going to repeat if Fraudger had anything to say about it…

    These clowns can’t even enforce the the rules they already have on the books….then they decide to enact and enforce new ones in the SB w/o even telling anyone. Rules that favored Eagles, such as Corey Clements ‘catch”, which was a catch that day, but on any other day prior in the modern history of the NFL would not have been a catch.

    Good luck everyone, trying to play in today’s NFL, with Fraudger constantly moving the goals posts to fit his agenda and pre-determined outcomes…
    LOL, NFL is a joke now

    e

  29. “Leave it to the media to spin things in a hundred different directions.”

    Did the media tell Anthony Lynn what to say?

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