London tickets sell out fast, and UK NFL fans aren’t happy

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The good news for the NFL is that its London fan base is big enough that games at Wembley Stadium sell out quickly. The bad news is there’s a growing perception among the UK fan base that the NFL is a greedy interloper fixated on maximizing profits while pricing out average fans.

Tickets for two games at Wembley Stadium went on sale yesterday, and the NFL announced early today that the Eagles-Jaguars game on October 28 has already sold out, while the Titans-Chargers game a week earlier has only “very limited single tickets available.”

That’s a healthy sign that the NFL is profitable in London, and it’s one of the reasons that Jaguars owner Shad Khan is eager to buy Wembley Stadium and put more NFL games there. At the same time, it was frustrating to local fans who couldn’t get tickets, especially when many of those tickets immediately popped up on resale sites for significantly more than the listed price.

“Due to the unprecedented demand for this sale, we understand that fans who missed out on tickets are frustrated,” the NFL said in a statement.

Liz Fox, who writes about the NFL from a UK perspective, noted that tickets on resale sites are priced so high that fans might as well buy a plane ticket and fly to the United States for a game.

“We love the fact we get games here in the UK, but if tickets are ending up on resale sites for £500 [$700] a ticket, fans will opt to save their money and head to America to see the real action,” Fox writes. “Genuine fans are being priced out by greedy individuals and businesses. If this continues, the NFL will see less fans being able to attend games, and in turn fans confidence will be lost when it comes to a franchise.”

The NFL has become popular enough that it can sell out a stadium in London. But it wants to become popular enough to generate big television ratings in the UK. And a perception that it’s catering only to the fans who can afford the expensive tickets at Wembley could hold the league back in the long run.

96 responses to “London tickets sell out fast, and UK NFL fans aren’t happy

  1. “Greedy individuals and businesses?” What an irritating mindset. If you or your business has money to buy something cool, good for you.

  2. The NFL is a business, not a social service. They should charge whatever people are willing to pay, and whatever is profitable for the NFL. You are not entitled to attend an NFL game unless you pay for a ticket.

  3. This is not unique to this year, it was actually a worse situation last year (or maybe I was more bothered because it was actually the team I support and I couldn’t get in).

    The NFL has compounded this by offering ‘Season’ Tickets as separate tickets, meaning many of the purchased multiples go straight on resale (i.e. before the single game tickets even get released) and has done away with the schemes which used to allow genuine / committed fans first crack at the release.

    My understanding is that the NFL profits quite nicely from a lot of the resell partnerships, so it’s almost as if it isn’t in there interests to do anything about it…

    BTW: anyone who is prepared to pay $500 for a ticket, go corporate hospitality instead, you get fed as well!

  4. See. This is the true NFL experience. Watching he game with friends at home, because most of us can’t afford to go

  5. “NFL is a greedy interloper fixated on maximizing profits while pricing out average fans.” Come on now the NFL would NEVER think of doing something like that. LOL. THAT is exactly what the NFL is and something us fans in the US have known for years.

  6. Isn’t this just how it works these days? People see a hot item and buy them early then resell it for triple the price? Happens all the time with concert tickets, video game consoles, phones, etc. It’s a crappy thing to do but it happens everywhere.

  7. At the same time, it was frustrating to local fans who couldn’t get tickets, especially when many of those tickets immediately popped up on resale sites for significantly more than the listed price.
    ___________________________________________________
    As long a dealers are allowed to buy blocks of prime tickets to ANY event, be it a concert, sports event, or even a Broadway show, the average person is going to get screwed. There needs to be laws that force the ORIGINAL issuer of the ticket to provide adequate numbers of tickets that CAN NOT be resold. At the very least there should be regulations that limit the secondary market price of the tickets. Should a Dad or Mom have to mortgage the farm to see their favorite team with their kids? It’s time for the pricing insanity to stop.

  8. Interesting to see the UK has the same issues as the US when it comes to ticket sales.

  9. I suggest the NFL abandon this “international play” idea. The fans in America don’t care about London and their football fans. They can create their own league, we don’t want a London team. We don’t want to lose our games to another country. That being said, their perception of the NFL is exactly correct, which is why they are playing in London to begin with. I currently live in Jax (Not a Jax fan) and everyone here was disappointed because they all were looking forward to watch the Eagles play Jax. Probably the best home game of the season for Jax fans and they lost it out to another country because the “NFL is a greedy interloper fixated on maximizing profits while pricing out average fans (Jax fans).

  10. So tickets in London are selling out fast. You see Toronto, that is how it’s done. Actually make it look like you support football. London sells tickets, Toronto had to paper the house for the Bills in Toronto.

  11. the NFL is a greedy interloper fixated on maximizing profits while pricing out average fans…

    Didn’t take them long to figure that out. Wait til they hear about PSLs.

  12. This is the same issue associated with any major event be it the NFL, Rock and Roll or a stage play. The ticket brokers get onto the sites first through automation and buy up all of the tickets they can on speculation then jack up the prices because they can. The only solution is through legislation which would make it a criminal offense to charge more than a certain mark-up of the original face value of the ticket

  13. Why in the world would the NFL not require or at least suggest that the stadium with hold a % of tickets to be purchased in person? Such purchasing could include maximum buy threshold of 4 tickets and other means to assure that regular folk get tix. Or why not offer various ticket packages to prior buyers? Clearly the data exists from prior purchaser (credit card) for many prior attendees. Geez.

  14. But heaven forbid the average scalper gets caught selling tix for over face on the street.

    Can’t have that now, can we.

    Simple solution, if they wanted to, aka if they really cared, simply limit resales to 4 (or whatever reasonable quantity) per seller max at any one time, as well as limit the time to post ’em for resale to no less than 60 days following the original purchase.

  15. Across the pond they don’t believe in free market economy or what? Guess what, if I have a product, and I can sell the entirety of that product, very quickly, at a certain price, why would I sell it for less? Right now demand outstrips supply, and this is what you get. It will work itself out. If and when demand goes down, prices will go down. Not a bad problem for the NFL to have in the UK.

  16. The same is true in the US. Games are all sold out and you need to buy tickets at inflated prices on the secondary market.

    There is a real problem if ticket brokers are getting the opportunity to sell tickets before British fans. If that’s the case, and the NFL is “in on it” with the brokers, then it’s somewhat corrupt and very greedy. If you want to grow the sport in England and increase television viewership, “get off the greed”.

  17. If there are X number of seat to be sold and Y number of people who want them, there can only be X number of tickets whether they are $10 or $700. The price of the ticket does not determine how many people can fit in the stadium.

    The only way the price of tickets goes down is if supply exceeds demand.

    If anyone thought that this wasn’t a money grab is naive. Most corporations are there for the money, not your benefit.

  18. “perception among the UK fan base that the NFL is a greedy interloper fixated on maximizing profits while pricing out average fans.” Thats not a perception its pure fact.

  19. Yet again, the greed of the few ruin the experience for the many.

    UK NFL Fans are now amongst a long list of sports followers who are priced out of the events they love due to these parasite ticket resellers buying up tickets in bulk and selling them on for mass profit.

    Disgraceful…

  20. London fans? What about American fans? Eagles fans got up early to be ready and online for the early morning release of tickets for the London game and were met with “technical difficulties” or had their credit card denied because they weren’t cleared for “internationally purchasing” when they had already booked a hotel in London with that same credit card! Yet miraculously, a mere minutes later, thousands of tickets appear on the secondary market at outrageously high prices and there’s no scam? Thanks NFL for screwing your many fans so you could make a few extra schillings more with your partnership with Stubhub! Scums!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  21. This is the same problem music bands have had. They didn’t sell out in the traditional sense, as it said, companies and others are buying the tickets and reselling them at a higher price, who have no interest in attending the game. Season ticket holders do the same thing, often times paying for their tickets from the profits of selling half the games tickets. Lets see how many people are actually at the game. The NFL made this merger with these legal scalping business and did not think through the impact it will have on true fans.

  22. There are extra surcharges for the privilege of seeing all attending NFL players stand up and pay respect to the British flag and national anthem. Their treatment of their own supposed home country is a bit more spotty.

  23. “…there’s a growing perception among the UK fan base that the NFL is a greedy interloper fixated on maximizing profits while pricing out average fans.”

    Why should it be different in the UK than in the US?

  24. “If this continues, the NFL will see less fans being able to attend games, and in turn fans confidence will be lost when it comes to a franchise.”

    Please stop mentioning a UK franchise. It’s not a feasible possibility until some hyperspeed form of travel comes around. And even then, no US fan likes watching early morning games on a day where people don’t want to get out of bed until late.

    Start a European (American) football league. Start small, and build it up.

  25. How does this have anything to do with the NFL. They put the tickets up for sale and after that they don’t have control over who buys and then re-sells the tickets. Its not as if the NFL is buying there own tickets and putting them on the secondary market. If the ppl over there really wanted to go to the game so bad they should’ve bought tickets when they went on sale and bought them directly from the league for face value. To say they are alienating the fan base because the secondary resalearket is too high that’s the ppl’s own fault for not grabbing tickets as soon as they went on sale. What do the ppl actually want the NFL to do about it? Should they buy every ticket on the secondary market at a high price abd then resell them at face value and eat the loss? If anything this is a problem they welcome w open arms. They sold out and there is still a huge demand for tickets.

  26. Unfortunately the nfl can’t control the resale market. Judging from the resale prices I would say that the face value of the tickets is underpriced if anything. I agree that the NFL is greedy but in this case it is the resellers that the anger should be directed at.

  27. As far as I know the NFL isn’t partners with Stub Hub. It is a conundrum for the owners, because they are not profiting from the premium prices. I believe owners profits are limited to the face value. I travel from Tulsa to Kansas City once every year for a game, as I’m sure many fans around the country that don’t live in NFL cities do. We know that many fans buy season tickets and immediately sell some to recoup some of their investment. Just look at how many Steeler or Packer fans show up at away games.
    One possible solution is limit big block purchases of tickets. These aren’t fans buyin season tickets. Theses are scalpers.
    In this scenario the scalper might purchase four and resale two. It’s still going to be for a slightly inflated price, just like my KC tickets. Bottom line, I’m okay with that, It’s a hard problem to solve.

  28. I don’t see a London based team for all the reasons cited over the last year by the experts (lol) on this board, but I do see 8 games a year being played at the Shad Khan owned Wembley Stadium.

    The Jaguars will not keep their one game per year there. The NFL will work out a rotation so 16 teams (8 games) will go to London each year. Mr. Khan will reap the rewards for the Wembley rental in exchange for giving up his London game every other year.

    In the 5 years or so that Mr. Khan has owned the Jaguars, he has followed through on every promise and then some.

  29. That’s very true of any event that is set to sell out. A lot of tickets are bought up by 3rd parties only trying to maximize the value on the resale sites.
    It sucks for poor people who maybe have to save for months to get to go to one game. But, that’s how the rich stay rich.
    It’s not the NFL though. They sell their tickets… the people buying them that put them back up for sale are the a-holes. I mean… but really aren’t we all getting mad only because we’re not the ones profiting from it.
    If we had the cash to do so, we’d buy up a bunch of tickets and scalp the hell out of them.

  30. So…its just like the NFL in America then?

    Eagles tickets for home games are gone within minutes. But they all end up on retail sites for 3-10 times that price immediately. Been that way for almost 20 years now.

    Welcome to the NFL rookie.

  31. The NFL loves it. When people complain about the price, they will want it more. Who the hell needs diamonds, they are too expensive.

  32. Upon further investigation, the NFL has partnered with Stub Hub. They get more data from Stub Hub about buyers, but no actual profit. The prices are simply what the market will bear. For years they have been bitter enemies, but starting in 2018 through 2022 they have a sharing agreement. Strange bedfellows…

  33. heybeerman95 says:
    May 2, 2018 at 7:10 am
    “NFL is a greedy interloper fixated on maximizing profits while pricing out average fans.” Come on now the NFL would NEVER think of doing something like that. LOL. THAT is exactly what the NFL is and something us fans in the US have known for years.

    —-

    No offense but that is called “capitalism” which happens to be the economic system of the world we live in. It is celebrated in America, and I guarantee you there is 1) no company in the world that isn’t looking to maximize profits and 2) they are only charging what people will pay. If those people happen to be those with more money, they are still working towards #1. The economy works on that.

    People act like the NFL is any different than any other company out there, and that there is some entitlement to see a game live. It isn’t a charity or a public service.

  34. Can they support 8 home games? Two novelty showings twice a year is great but you’re talking about long-term fan interest. Plus you got guys traveling across the ocean to live. Taxes, taxes and more taxes. Dudes can’t even stay out of trouble in the US, you do something shady in the UK or over in Europe and you might wind up buried in the Old World beneath a pig farm.

  35. Here, it seems to me, is that you have your season ticket holders, a lot of which are corporations, and well to do people. But for general seating, ticket brokers get the first choice and then jack up the price via fees, and the general fans fight it out over the leftovers.

  36. The bad news is there’s a growing perception among the UK fan base that the NFL is a greedy interloper fixated on maximizing profits while pricing out average fans.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Welcome to the party. You can add your voices to the millions of US fans who are ignored

  37. See. This is the true NFL experience. Watching he game with friends at home, because most of us can’t afford to go…which translated means: the advertising dollars of TV rules…it’s a tried and true NFL experience…

  38. No surprise here. its part of the “New World Order” or “New US Order”that has been in place for 30 something years. Sad part are the schmucks posting here who obviously vote against themselves every year and see no problem with “Their Overlords” profiting from this “thievery”…

  39. robertlseverson says:

    May 2, 2018 at 7:31 am

    Why in the world would the NFL not require or at least suggest that the stadium with hold a % of tickets to be purchased in person? Such purchasing could include maximum buy threshold of 4 tickets and other means to assure that regular folk get tix. Or why not offer various ticket packages to prior buyers? Clearly the data exists from prior purchaser (credit card) for many prior attendees. Geez.

    —————

    I remember in 2001, waiting from 2am until 8am for the Eagles playoff games to get tickets. They stopped that the following year, only selling tickets through Ticketmaster. Which, added in a “convenience charge”. Since then, you can only call to get single game tickets, and good luck beating agents with hundreds of phone lines dialing at the same time, beating out 90% of fans, just to resell them.

  40. The bad news is there’s a growing perception among the UK fan base that the NFL is a greedy interloper fixated on maximizing profits while pricing out average fans.
    —————————–

    They should have realized that when they saw that the NFL was willing to screw American fans by sending games out of the country/overseas.

  41. Just hoping I get a Raiders ticket when they go on sale. Hoping to have our own ‘Black Hole’ – the costumes ready. Just need a ticket !!

    @ riflemanlax – That’ll never work with a european league. What do you think NFL Europe was ? Started off well then failed as teams wouldnt send over decent players. With proper NFL regular season games available fans dont want to see 3rd stringers play in a ‘small league’.

  42. chap6869 says:

    May 2, 2018 at 7:43 am

    London fans? What about American fans? Eagles fans got up early to be ready and online for the early morning release of tickets for the London game and were met with “technical difficulties” or had their credit card denied because they weren’t cleared for “internationally purchasing” when they had already booked a hotel in London with that same credit card! Yet miraculously, a mere minutes later, thousands of tickets appear on the secondary market at outrageously high prices and there’s no scam? Thanks NFL for screwing your many fans so you could make a few extra schillings more with your partnership with Stubhub! Scums!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    ——

    My card was declined for International Sales, when I specifically called my bank (USAA) the previous day to inform them. They ensured my card and account were able to be used internationally for 30 days.

    Magically, the tickets for the Eagles London game vanished and were no longer available, while still in transaction. Seconds later, sold out.

    Scum, and a scam.

  43. “there’s a growing perception among the UK fan base that the NFL is a greedy interloper fixated on maximizing profits while pricing out average fans”

    It’s not a perception, and it’s not limited to UK fans

  44. Need a team in Mexico before London. Mexico has by far the most people on foreign soil who call themselves (American) football fans (the UK isn’t even second place, it’s Brazil). It’s also closer, reducing the travel times that teams need to get there. Also to anyone who says “It’s not safe!” When Oakland and Houston played in Mexico City, the violent crime rates of the two American cities dwarfed the violent crime rate in Mexico City. If you can put a team in Baltimore or Detroit, you can put one in Mexico City. Keep in mind that Mexico City is bigger than London and New York by population and that Mexico has a sport-loving culture.

  45. Christopher says:
    May 2, 2018 at 7:24 am
    I suggest the NFL abandon this “international play” idea. The fans in America don’t care about London and their football fans. They can create their own league, we don’t want a London team. We don’t want to lose our games to another country. That being said, their perception of the NFL is exactly correct, which is why they are playing in London to begin with. I currently live in Jax (Not a Jax fan) and everyone here was disappointed because they all were looking forward to watch the Eagles play Jax. Probably the best home game of the season for Jax fans and they lost it out to another country because the “NFL is a greedy interloper fixated on maximizing profits while pricing out average fans (Jax fans).

    Season ticket holders paid for seat licenses, the NFL has no right to take home games from us. We paid for the right to buy 8 regular season games per season.
    KEEP ALL NFL GAMES IN THE USA !

  46. This shouldn’t be a UK problem (any more) because they now have new laws against bulk-buying tickets for selling at inflated prices. Individual touting was technically illegal already, but a long talked about bulk and digital ticket-resale law came into effect in January 2018 and the NFL are in clear breach if they allowed online mass-selling of tickets to resellers. The only bulk-buying now allowed is a percentage for blocks pre-allocated to vacation packages.

  47. but don’t worry – the product is terrible too …. the SB was awesome with it’s one defensive play for the entire game.

  48. The whole premise of games in Europe was to introduce Europeans to American football. Now the average fans can’t get in to watch because the resellers get first crack at the tickets? The greed of NFL owners know no boundry’s and in this case shortsighted and stupid.

  49. Here’s a frightening thought… a resurrection of the Concord (or other Super Sonic plane) would make a trip to London no worse than a cross country flight is now.

    I feel like London is going to be their new strong-arm tactic since they’ve already “used up” LA and Vegas… unless they use Mexico City to threaten fan bases first and then go back to London as “the looming threat.”

  50. The NFL owners smell money in London. They have for some time now. Kahn buys Wembley and it’s game on. More and more games will be scheduled in London and then goodbye Jacksonville.

  51. In my opinion “Sold Out” is being misused here…. Sold Out to me is when all the tickets are bought by fans that will have butts in seats, not resale scheme Ticket Brokers that will leave the seat empty because no one will buy tickets at inflated prices.

  52. “There’s a growing perception among the UK fan base that the NFL is a greedy interloper fixated on maximizing profits while pricing out average fans.”

    You just figured that out? You could have found that out decades ago by just talking to the GENERATIONS of “average” fans who were priced out after supporting the NFL for YEARS, starting in the 1920s.

  53. “Genuine fans are being priced out by greedy individuals and businesses.”

    AMERICAN-STYLE CAPITALISM, BABY!!! SINK OR SWIM!!! USA #1!!!

  54. najacoo22 says:
    May 2, 2018 at 6:58 am
    The NFL is a business, not a social service. They should charge whatever people are willing to pay, and whatever is profitable for the NFL. You are not entitled to attend an NFL game unless you pay for a ticket.
    ————————————
    That sounds great in theory but the problem with your logic is that as long as the NFL and other leagues( NBA MLB NHL) continue to jack up prices on the secondary market( and yes, all the leagues have a partnership with Stubhub and others) then they are going to price out the average fan. It’s not the corporations who are buying their Jerseys etc., It’s us, the diehard, average fan. There is a breaking point with this and the NFL is getting dangerously close to losing their fanbase, i.e.CASHCOW!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  55. Same problem exists in NFL games in the US and frankly every other sporting event with moderate interest. The answer is SCALPERS or Professional Ticket Resale groups. These people buy season ticket packages in bulk and set the secondary market at 1.5-4.0 times what they paid. I even know a guy that admits they’d rather throw tickets in the garbage than reduce them to below face value (in the rare instance where demand is much lower than expected), thus effectively setting an artificially inflated floor. The only answer is to buy season tickets (even if you don’t want that many games) and then sell the games you don’t want/need. If you aren’t greedy it’s easy to undercut the rest of the secondary market and get your money back at a minimum (even with exorbitant Stub Hub fees in the middle)

  56. Bots are ruining the internet from influencing and interfering with elections and incessantly promoting one political view or country to auto buying tickts to events extremely quickly. There is talk of legislation to outlaw auto buying bots because events often sell out before the public even gets a real chance to buy tickets.

  57. @jlinatl says:
    Does the NFL have a contract with that reseller?
    ===================================================================
    Well, they own it. It’s called NFL Ticket Exchange.

  58. “If you or your business has money to buy something cool, good for you.”
    _______________________

    But that strategy won’t lead to the NFL succeeding long-term abroad. Businesses and the uber wealthy will throw money at whatever is hot at that moment and will disappear the second the next new thing comes along. What the NFL needs is a real, middle-class fan base over there and they aren’t going to build that by pricing the average fan out from Day 1.

  59. “Genuine fans are being priced out by greedy individuals and businesses. If this continues, the NFL will see less fans being able to attend games, and in turn fans confidence will be lost when it comes to a franchise.”
    =====

    Welcome to North America 20 years ago.

    I love old news!!!….

  60. I’m not sure how this is the NFL’s fault. If anything this means the NFL is not pricing the tickets high enough. If a third party can make a profit off of just re-selling a ticket at a much higher price, then the NFL would be wise to cut out the middle man and just raise the price of the ticket. Then at least the purchaser wouldn’t be stuck with the service fee charged by the third party ticket broker.

  61. @weepingjebus says:

    There are extra surcharges for the privilege of seeing all attending NFL players stand up and pay respect to the British flag and national anthem. Their treatment of their own supposed home country is a bit more spotty.
    =====================================================================================
    There’s a reason why all of that started and a reason why it continues to be a discussion. Look in the mirror and you’ll see it’s people that look just like you, some of them wearing uniforms too and carrying badges.

  62. Some say NFL Europe was a failure – but the problem was NFL Europe itself – a cut-down version of the World League without the less profitable (but mostly badly chosen) American teams which then made a reduced product for Europe, one which the NFL then continually messed with by cutting/adding/moving teams, which only served to totally pee off the many European fans who’d loved the World League. But the NFL could easily bring back a World Conference by replacing the silly US teams with the recently bereft St Louis and San Diego (and maybe Mexico City), which would all be popular enough.

  63. This has nothing to do with the face value cost of a ticket, this is a problem where people/organisations/businesses are buying tickets purely to resell them at a huge profit.

    The NFL should ban this practice and have all tickets for resale to be made available via a website they control. I would even go so far as to add that all tickets when purchased (for over 18 year olds) should have the name of the person they have been purchased for on them and proof of identity brought to the game.

    If a person buys two tickets but say one person can’t make it, then the original buyer can either return the ticket (minus an admin fee) for resale by the NFL, or they can pay a small fee to have the name on the ticket changed.

    I have been to several NFL games in the UK and have seen tickets available on eBay for ridiculous amounts of money. Then when you go to the game there are ticket touts outside the stadium with large amounts of tickets asking for equally large amounts of money. Then when inside the stadium, you can’t help but see the empty seats.

  64. The NFL relationship with ticket brokers is bad for the sport. I have been a season ticket holder since about 1994-95 and when I first started going to the games I knew every single person around me and my section…. 25 years later the majority of the seats around me are owned by ticket agencies and there different people sitting there every week. Soaring ticket prices have priced out “ordinary” fans and they have been replaced by band wagoneers buying their tickets for outrageous amounts. This sucks for us regular fans but I’m sure it is good for the NFL and owners…while times are good. What happens when times aren’t so good and all these tick agencies dump their tickets??? Whether they like it or not the NFL needs its regular fan base for the long term health of the sport

  65. I wonder if Jags season ticket holders get any preference since it is listed as a home game for them.

  66. Well….that’s the problem isn’t it? In LA for example the Chargers will ‘charge’ $500 for two tickets plus $100 for parking and extremely high concession fees. Al this for one game!

  67. Talk about collusion. Ticket sellers and resellers have been colluding for years. With today’s technology, it is very easy to sell tickets to verified individual buyers, with ID required, and no ability for transfer. Buyers can always turn their tickets back in for refund. If you wanna go to Wimbledon for example, plan to queue up and or get tickets in the lottery but attend yourself or return your tickets as they are not transferrable (except for a very few select group of tickets).

  68. mrbiggstuff says:
    May 2, 2018 at 6:45 am
    Now they’re getting the FULL NFL experience!
    ——————————————————————————————-
    Their learning what we already know! LOL
    Welcome to our world Londoneers!!

  69. the only ones that want games in Europe are the owners cuz they’re very greedy and don’t care what the fans want but this would be the end of the NFL!

  70. “…The bad news is there’s a growing perception among the UK fan base that the NFL is a greedy interloper fixated on maximizing profits while pricing out average fans…”

    ————————————-

    Well, obviously.

  71. No offense but that is called “capitalism” which happens to be the economic system of the world we live in. It is celebrated in America, and I guarantee you there is 1) no company in the world that isn’t looking to maximize profits and 2) they are only charging what people will pay. If those people happen to be those with more money, they are still working towards #1. The economy works on that.

    People act like the NFL is any different than any other company out there, and that there is some entitlement to see a game live. It isn’t a charity or a public service.

    ————————————————-

    Yes – but you see how this is a big con, right? The NFL sets a ticket price – if that’s the actual, true price of the ticket, that’s fine. That’s what’s advertised. If the NFL allows brokers to buy up huge blocks of tickets and resell them at highly inflated prices, then THAT is the actual price of the ticket.

    It’s not an honest FREE MARKET (which is supposed to be a key part of capitalism, right?) if the average person doesn’t even have a chance to buy a ticket at the advertised price.

    This is price gouging that the NFL is allowing. That is not the same thing as capitalism. If you think the true spirit and best practices of capitalism should be that only those with money get to participate and should be allowed to game the system like this, then we’re all screwed. And yes – I understand that we’re all screwed.

  72. It’s so hard to imagine the NFL and Shad Khan continue to pimp Jacksonville fans for London. This game features the reigning Super Bowl Champion Philadelphia Eagles vs Jacksonville that came just a few minutes away from playing Philly in the Super Bowl. It’s a slap in the face to NFL fans, particularly Jags fans!

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