NFL finds itself in middle of unprosecuted sexual assault case from 2005

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The NFL finds itself caught in the middle of a situation that cries out for the justice that it never received when it happened more than a decade ago.

Via the New York Post, the lawyer currently representing Luisa Esposito has asked Commissioner Roger Goodell to encourage Lisa Friel, the league’s special counsel for investigations to take action in a case that fell under her jurisdiction when the situation arose in 2005.

Esposito contends that attorney Allen Isaac groped her and demanded sexual favors from her in connection with representation stemming from an automobile accident. Esposito managed to capture one of her meetings with Isaac on tape, and it was enough to get him kicked out of the Wall Street law firm he founded. However, Isaac never was prosecuted.

So why Friel? At the time, she led the Manhattan District Attorney’s Sex-Crimes Unit, and she didn’t prosecute Isaac. So Esposito’s new lawyer, Peter Gleason, wants Goodell to tell Friel to tell the DA to move on the case.

On the surface, the approach seems nonsensical. Why would the DA’s office listen to Friel, years after she left the job? (Besides, the DA’s office seems to indeed be acting on the case.) At a deeper level, the strategy makes plenty of sense, because Gleason has managed to use the NFL connection as a way to bring attention to the story — and possibly to achieve justice for his client, 13 years after the fact.

17 responses to “NFL finds itself in middle of unprosecuted sexual assault case from 2005

  1. Friel’s not busy, there’s no one in the NFC East that could possibly be investigated besides Eli Manning and his counterfeit memorabilia scam, and we know she won’t be doing anything about that.

  2. Damn! NOT prosecuting despite recorded evidence of a sex-crime is what made me pick Friel for the post of NFL’s Special Counsel for Investigations in the first place!

  3. Because as we all know the NFL is now in charge of dispensing justice in this country.

  4. Everywhere you turn. Corruption Corruption Corruption. Politics. Entertainment. Sports. You name it and it’s corrupt. We are like the Romans. At least the end part of the Roman Empire.

    Friends, Romans, Country Men…lend me your ears. Then I’ll make off with them like a thief in the night. Corruption.

  5. Kinda feels like the Cosby case all over again, details a little different, but that’s semantics. So you got groped when younger, tell at the time. Sometimes I know it may be hard, but what gives people the right to potentially ruin someone’s life a decade later, then again I guess it only happens when you got money.

  6. If nobody gets prosecuted its all BS.. Just like all the stuff on tv… yawn.

  7. This sounds like the case does need to be prosecuted, but its not the NFL that should be on the hook to do it. At the time the ball got dropped Friel was with the DA’s office so its on the DA’s to pick it back up again. (And that did sound like it was happening). Despite the NFL’s high profile (and depth of pocket) the victims lawyer should be leaving the NFL alone. Even if they decide to sue Friel and or the DA’s office at some point thats not something the NFZl can do.

  8. sexyrexy5000 says:
    May 7, 2018 at 8:40 am
    Is a recorded conversation without the other person’s consent inadmissible in court?
    ——————————
    Depends, often yes. It’s admissable if it’s legal and of course a judge might authorize police to do it. But as to private citizens doing it, any non-private place (be it a park, house party, even your mean boss’ office) it can be legal if one of the participants is doing the recording. But in 12 states if it’s in a space deemed to be totally private and at a time deemed totally private (eg, a private bedroom late at night) it’s effectively inadmissable because both participants would need to give consent. So if she was simply recording a conversation he was having with her at work, it might well be admissable if it directly relates – such as recording harassment in an harrassment case.

  9. Gordon Andrews says:
    May 7, 2018 at 8:40 am

    Kinda feels like the Cosby case all over again, details a little different, but that’s semantics. So you got groped when younger, tell at the time. Sometimes I know it may be hard, but what gives people the right to potentially ruin someone’s life a decade later, then again I guess it only happens when you got money.

    She DID tell at the time and turned over the video evidence, but the DA under Friel refused to prosecute. Perhaps she and Isaac were ‘friends with benefits’?

  10. Before people came to this site, they knew nothing about this 13 yr old case. Now after reading a 10 line summary on a football website, everyone is confident about prosecution. This is the problem with America right now. The author knows nothing about this case and is supposed to be reporting football news, yet feels compelled to address his perceived social ills. Sad.

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