Vegas, L.A. to become cornerstones of new Super Bowl rotation

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What happens in Vegas really will stay in Vegas.

Although the NFL’s newest city somewhat surprisingly won’t receive either of the two Super Bowls that owners are expected to award this week (LVII and LVIII will go to Arizona and New Orleans, respectively), Las Vegas is expected to get one of the next Super Bowls awarded after that.

Per a source with knowledge of the situation, the new Raiders stadium in Las Vegas likely will be hosting Super Bowl LIX or LX (those may or may not be the right Roman numerals for numbers 59 and 60). Whenever the Super Bowl makes its way to Nevada, it’s expected to instantly become one of the cornerstones of the new Super Bowl rotation.

As the source explained it, the anticipated reaction to the first Super Bowl in Las Vegas will be something like this, “Why don’t we have it here every year?” And while that’s not practical, the Super Bowl likely will be returning to Las Vegas every four or five years.

One problem with Las Vegas arises from its overall popularity for hosting big events. More advance notice will be required to secure the city’s convention center and hotels for use by the NFL. But with Super Bowls currently committed nearly six years out, that isn’t expected to be a problem.

The problem will be finishing out the rotation, with Vegas and Los Angeles as the anchor tenants at the Mall of America’s Real Pastime. Beyond that, it gets a little more cloudy.

Miami also is expected to be in the new rotation. Arizona and New Orleans are expected to be vying for the fourth spot, with New Orleans getting the edge if/when stadium renovations are finalized. The four prongs of the rotation will then be supplemented by the periodic wild card, with cities like Atlanta and Dallas ending up being the fifth destination every half decade or so. Likewise, non-rotation cities with new stadiums could end up in the mix.

The absence of a formal bidding process will make it much easier for the league to engineer a preferred rotation of the game, as long as the cities in the rotation accept the invitation to host it. And surely they will, because if/when a city otherwise in the rotation declines, the opportunity to do it again may not return any time soon.

For Vegas and L.A., the opportunities will be consistent.

35 responses to “Vegas, L.A. to become cornerstones of new Super Bowl rotation

  1. Las Vegas is ideal for hosting big events, there’s loads of hotels obviously, everything is tightly packed and transit options abound.

    Conversely, Los Angeles is singularly awful in the second and third respects. The city sprawls inhumanly and you have to allow 2-3 hours to be sure to arrive across town on time, even at odd hours. Sure, the weather is great, TV resources are nearly infinite, and the “hey here’s this celebrity” -factor is off the charts. I get why the NFL wants it there, but it has nothing to do with a good fan experience.

  2. With several existing stadiums in cities that can adequately support the hosting of a Super Bowl, NO single stadium should every be in the rotation every 4 or 5 years.

    Now we all know that New Jersey and Jacksonville aren’t getting another one and no one wants a Super Bowl in Green Bay, Buffalo, Pittsburg, Cincinatti, Cleveland, Baltimore, Washington, Denver, Chicago, Seattle or New England due to weather issues for the game and in some cases the lack of adequate hotel space in the immediate area.

    But that still leaves over half the stadiums available that can, could or have hosted a SB. I think a 10 year rotation is a better concept than trying to force feed 4 sites as the answer to an unasked question.

    “Why don’t we have it here every year?” – said no one ever…

  3. If the NFL expects its teams to play in modern stadiums, which in turn means taxpayers foot most of the bill, then the NFL needs a way to share the wealth so to speak. It’s not really fair that a small number of cities get to enjoy the economic benefit of hosting the Super Bowl.

  4. The Super Bowl rotation should have always been limited to a handful of cities in mild climates. No offense to the people who live there, but seriously, who really wants to attend a game in February in Minneapolis or Detroit? Yeah, they have domed stadiums. But you can only be at the stadium for so long before you have go back out into the cold and snow. Keep it to LA, Miami, Vegas, New Orleans and Arizona, and it’ll work out well.

  5. Awesome. As much as I love many cities across the country, let’s stop sending the masses to the Northeast and Midwest in February.

    Even if you aren’t going to the game, all the live prop betting in Vegas is a good enough time in its own right.

  6. I just read that the cost of Kroenke World will surpass four billion dollars. And folks still believe he’s paying all of that out of his own pocket.

  7. They should keep Atlanta in the rotation because that city knows how to put on big events. No matter what they do to that dump in New Orleans, it won’t be as nice as the new facility in Atlanta. Atlanta also has the hotel rooms and the more convenient airport for national and international purposes.

  8. “Why don’t we have it here every year?” – said no one ever…
    ———————————————————-
    Actually you hear that question again and again every time the Super Bowl is held in New Orleans or San Diego. It was even said in Indianapolis. Some cities are ideally suited for this sort of thing, and some aren’t. It’s amazing to me how badly Jerry Jones screwed his chance up, because he no doubt built that stadium with the Super Bowl in mind.

  9. What about Levis stadium again. Best weather that time of year. Also they are planning to put 2 billion into building around the stadium with hotels, restaurants, shopping so people dont have to travel from SF for the game.

  10. Can’t wait to see how badly fans get gouged for a hotel room in Vegas for the Super Bowl. MGM is already fully out of control, charging a $34 (and up) “resort fee” per night (which is also taxed by the state, to add insult to injury), plus all of their properties charge at least $10/night for parking, and that’s going up right now. So nowadays, even if you’re “comped”, you’re paying at least $44/night for your “free” room. If there’s some UFC fight featuring a tomato can you’ve never heard of, yep, expect the gouge factor to go up then too. Last weekend the fricken Electric Daisy Carinval was in town and rates were jacked way up everywhere, plus airfares were higher than normal too. The gouge factor for a Super Bowl will be off the charts.

  11. I just read that the cost of Kroenke World will surpass four billion dollars. And folks still believe he’s paying all of that out of his own pocket.
    ————-
    He’s paying for it the same way as 99% of Americans pay for homes and businesses, he’s financing it. Good for him. I’d rather he takes out loans to build it than ask for taxpayers to front the costs.

  12. fivetimechamps49 says:
    May 22, 2018 at 9:28 am

    What about Levis stadium again. Best weather that time of year. Also they are planning to put 2 billion into building around the stadium with hotels, restaurants, shopping so people dont have to travel from SF for the game.

    ——————————————————

    As a Niner Faithful I can proudly say that Levi’s is a fugly misaligned erector set and hosting another Super Bowl there would be straight ca ca.

  13. Taurus says:
    May 22, 2018 at 10:50 am
    New Orleans is a dump hole!! Please take them off the list!!

    ——————————————————————————————-

    New Orleans is a perfect city to host a large event like the SB. Tons of hotel rooms (a lot of them located right in downtown or very close by). Stadium is an easy walk from downtown. Weather will be mild. Tons of bars. Tons of restaurants – a lot of them are good too. Everything is within a close proximity – NFL events, team events, radio row, etc.

  14. Minnesota just demonstrated that northern teams with indoor stadiums can successfully host a Super Bowl. So for every five warm weather cities selected, one cold weather city with adequate facilities should get the opportunity.

  15. I hope they don’t start withholding Super Bowls from Tampa just because the stadium was built in 1998. It’s still gorgeous stadium–one of the best in the league–and there’s zero chance for any more public funding for another one.

  16. blowfishes says:
    May 22, 2018 at 11:12 am
    Minnesota just demonstrated that northern teams with indoor stadiums can successfully host a Super Bowl. So for every five warm weather cities selected, one cold weather city with adequate facilities should get the opportunity.
    ———————————————————
    “Successfully host”? The only two locations that anything happened in for a week was the stadium and the shopping mall. Let’s aim a little higher for such an enormous event, shall we?

  17. Minnesota; “Successfully host? The only two locations that anything happened in for a week was the stadium and the shopping mall. Let’s aim a little higher for such an enormous event, shall we”?
    ———————————-
    Reside in MN, and I was here during the week leading up to the Super Bowl. There were numerous locations that ‘things happened’ beyond the stadium and mall. Both Downtown Minneapolis and St.Paul hosted plenty of ‘happening’ events. You just had to get out of your warm UBER or limousine to enjoy them. The ‘Mega Mall’ is not my favorite entertainment/shopping venue. I agree that warm weather locations are more desirable, however ‘we’ did a pretty decent job keeping fans entertained.

  18. noringsforvikings says:

    “Successfully host”? The only two locations that anything happened in for a week was the stadium and the shopping mall. Let’s aim a little higher for such an enormous event, shall we?
    ###

    You obviously aren’t aware of all the things that went on in the Twin Cities during SB week.

  19. This is such complete garbage. No city should ever pony up a cent to build a stadium that won’t be considered for a Super Bowl. Football was meant to be played in the elements. Who cares if the pansy corporate types are scared of a little cold weather?

  20. gridironmike said,
    “It’s amazing to me how badly Jerry Jones screwed his chance up, because he no doubt built that stadium with the Super Bowl in mind.”

    gridironmike is right. I was living in Dallas in 2011. We had an ice storm that completely paralyzed the DFW region for the week preceding the game. There was no coordination between the municipalities to deal with the ice and the subfreezing temperatures that made outdoor events unworkable. Then giant chunks of ice started falling off the roof of the big new stadium and onto the heads of people walking below. Finally, at game time nearly 1300 paying fans could not attend the game because their seats were not installed properly.
    Way to go Jerry Jones!

  21. As for what happened when the Cowboys hosted it:

    2011 was truly a freak storm. It was considered to be a 50-year storm that hit the DFW area and they were totally caught off guard because such storms almost never happen there.

    Houston and New Orleans would have had a big problem as well as temps in those cities were barely above freezing that week, most of the rest of Texas and the entire southwest region was pretty much frozen (Oaklawn Park in Arkansas lost seven days of racing to that storm) and Chicago got an all-time record snowfall from a single storm among other problems from that storm. The irony was, had the game been a week earlier, temps would have been perfect in the mid-70s in the DFW area just a week earlier.

    The seating problems in that stadium I believe were related to the storm as crews I believe were unable to get there parts of that week ahead of the game to finish installing the seating in time.

    Just a freak set of circumstances in that case.

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