The Julio Jones holdout could last awhile

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Every so often, a player with multiple years left on his contract stays away from training camp. In rare instances, the absence lingers into the regular season. Most, however, end up showing up — often without anything other than a commitment from the team not to collect on the fines racked up during the absence.

With Falcons receiver Julio Jones, there’s a good chance it won’t play out that way. Jones seems to be a man of principle. Unhappy with a contract that pays him only $10.5 million this year (in comparison to the $30 million per year in new money paid to quarterback Matt Ryan), Jones has tried to get the team to rectify the situation.

Every step of the way, the team assumed that he was merely sending a message in 2018 about wanting a new deal in 2019. Eventually, the team reportedly told him that there will be no new deal this year, conveniently citing budgetary concerns. (“We don’t have the money in the budget to pay you” is a courteous way of saying, “We don’t want to pay the money.”)

If/when Jones doesn’t show up, the Falcons will need to make a decision. Do they continue to believe Jones is merely sending a message, or do they believe that he’d actually skip regular-season games without a new deal? Would he skip a full 10 weeks, allowing him to get credit for the contract year? Would he actually skip the full season?

Most would never do it. For Jones, who isn’t wired like most, the fact that he’s already gone this far suggests that maybe he would.

The best argument against giving him more money continues to be that tearing up his current contract with three years left on it sets a bad precedent. But that’s a red herring. To any player who tries to do the same in the future, the response would (should) be, “Perform like Julio Jones and then we’ll talk.”

The better approach would be to find a way to quickly craft a win-win that allows Jones to believe that the team has addressed his concerns in a meaningful way. Jones acting so out of character proves how much it means to Jones. Which indicates he won’t fold up the tents and return to the team simply because he’s getting nervous about the $40,000 per day fine, and because he’s hopeful that the team will agree to waive the amount due if he just shows up.

35 responses to “The Julio Jones holdout could last awhile

  1. Falcons should absolutely rework his contract. They are way overpaying for a guy who scored 3 td’s last year…..Yes, 3 td’s total last year….

  2. Only $10.5 million. Maybe he and LeVeon Bell should hang out and cry together. Here’s a thought. When you negotiate a contract, know that salaries will keep going up during the contract period. Do your best, sign it and honour it. NFL salaries go up every year. It doesn’t give you the right to breach. Honor or your word, play well, and get even wealthier in a few years. Agents are probably part of the problem.

  3. Tear up the contract and offer him like 28.3 million over 2 years. Its a far more appropriate per/year number and it should make all sides happy.

  4. The only clowns who don’t know Julio is an absolutely dominant monster are fantasy losers. Be mad at the drunk OC ATL replaced Shannahan with instead of embarrassing yourself.

    In the real world of football, there isn’t a DB or coordinator who wants to face him.

  5. The best argument against giving him more money continues to be that tearing up his current contract with three years left on it sets a bad precedent. But that’s a red herring.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    It is NOT a red herring. It is a position based on principles. If principles can be altered based on circumstances then they are not principles at all. The excuse given is the red herring. If they give Julio money, when the next guy tries it the author’s stance will change. Instead of saying the next player is no Julio, he will simply say that it can be done and should be done because the precedent has been set. Jones traded back end money and leverage for up front money and security. His cost now is the reason he got what he got then. To try to change the parameters because he feels slighted because someone else got more money later on is simply a ridiculous entitlement mentality.

  6. Julio should sit out until the Falcons cave if he is that dedicated, even if it takes the whole season. Ask for $20mil a season too while you’re at it. Atlanta can then have the first $30mil QB, $20mil WR combo in NFL history and basically have peanuts for the rest of the team. Make it happen Dimitroff!

    Signed,

    Rest of NFC South

  7. Top players should only sign 3-year deals for more money(and fully guaranteed, at least, for injury). Because, on these longer termed deals, if the player underperforms, he is cut or if he outperforms the terms, he is unhappy. And with the franchise tag blowing up the upper-echelon player salary structure, top players with long-term deals are always going to be unhappy.

  8. its just greed.he makes plenty of money and no its not a savy binnes move.it shows hes is greedy.Oh he needs to get while he can-laughing very hard at that one.he already got it.

  9. There is also the danger that they find out they can win without him. I still remember the Falcons missing a chance for the Super Bowl last year because Jones let the pass go right through his hands instead of catching it for a winning TD in the Philadelphia game in the playoffs. A good receiver should have made the catch. He is a great receiver. Dwight Clark made a similar catch to beat Dallas.

  10. Patrick says:
    The only clowns who don’t know Julio is an absolutely dominant monster are fantasy losers. Be mad at the drunk OC ATL replaced Shannahan with instead of embarrassing yourself.
    In the real world of football, there isn’t a DB or coordinator who wants to face him.

    –Is that you Jimmy? Guy had more drops than TD’s last year.

  11. FinFan68 says:
    July 25, 2018 at 11:16 am
    The best argument against giving him more money continues to be that tearing up his current contract with three years left on it sets a bad precedent. But that’s a red herring.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    It is NOT a red herring. It is a position based on principles. If principles can be altered based on circumstances then they are not principles at all. The excuse given is the red herring.

    ———–

    Yes x1000. Brilliant post….I could not agree more.

  12. hksteelerfan says:
    July 25, 2018 at 10:48 am

    Only $10.5 million. Maybe he and LeVeon Bell should hang out and cry together. Here’s a thought. When you negotiate a contract, know that salaries will keep going up during the contract period. Do your best, sign it and honour it. NFL salaries go up every year. It doesn’t give you the right to breach. Honor or your word, play well, and get even wealthier in a few years. Agents are probably part of the problem.

    Curious if he slipped in production and fell off and ATL just decided to cut him would you be going out of you mind at them for not “HONORING” the details of the contract. I very seriously doubt it.

  13. Only 10.5 million. The writers keep saying only 10.5 million.

    The guy wanted a long term contract, and he got his wish. Now that he’s not making as much as he wants halfway in, he wants the team to pay him more. Man up, you signed the deal, live with it. 10.5 million is more than enough.

  14. If he was a man of principle, he would honor his commitment. Not doing something because you aren’t happy isn’t having principle, it’s acting like a child. I’m even happier now that the Bengals drafted AJ Green over Jones.

  15. Unhappy with a contract that pays him only $10.5 million this year (in comparison to the $30 million per year in new money paid to quarterback Matt Ryan), Jones has tried to get the team to rectify the situation.

    First of all, he received a $12M signing bonus which means his salary is effectively $12.5M this year. These guys always omit the signing bonus when whining about money. Secondly, if he thinks because they gave their QB $30M (way overpaid) that they should give him a truckload more money then he’s delusional.

    I’m sure he was delighted to get the extra six years at the time. Now he isn’t. Most people will work their entire lives and never make $1M. Julio is complaining about making a “measly” $10.5M. Unreal.

  16. Captain Kirk set the model…these players need to start operating on 1-2 year deals…so they aren’t “underpaid” 3 years into their long term contract.

  17. .
    The Falcons could give him an incentive based package to enhance his compensation. Last season the Patriots gave Gronk such a package and it was a win win for both parties.
    .

  18. Just shut up and play out your contract. Or just retire. Unless your stupid you have enough for your grandkids to live on.

  19. Atlanta should not give into this extortionist – he signed a contract – hold him to it – fine him until there is no money left to collect.

    So sick of these jerks who sign a piece of paper and have no intention of keeping their word.

  20. The top 1% of players (generational talents) are/should be treated differently … restructure the contract of the second string tackle and add some cash to Julio’s deal.

  21. These players should realize that the minute they sign a deal that it’s borrowed time before the next deal passes them by in short order; see Carr, Stafford. That’s just the nature of the beast that things are always trending up for the next guy in line. When he signed that deal at the time it was fair market value for him and did it willingly. If he truly is “principled” he should honor it and wait to next year when Atlanta said they would be open to renegotiate which seems fair as there still would be one year remaining. Golden Tate vastly outplayed his current deal but isn’t whining. Time to sack up Julio and play ball.

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