Falcons did what they had to do to make Julio Jones happy

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Old-school football types will scoff at the Falcons’ decision to pay more money to a player when the team didn’t have to, but the Falcons probably would respond by saying, “We had to.”

While the details haven’t been disclosed or leaked yet (they surely will be), the Falcons did enough with Jones’ 2018 compensation to get him to show up for training camp and renew his vows with the team that made a bold move up in the 2011 draft to get him. If they hadn’t, who knows when Jones would have shown up?

That’s the message the Falcons surely gleaned by the player’s willingness to boycott training camp. As explained on Wednesday, Jones’ decision to stay away suggested a commitment to his cause that would have caused him to continue his absence into the regular season, showing up either after 10 weeks or not at all.

The team tried to hide behind budgetary considerations, which anyone with any real business experience knows is a flimsy excuse to not cough up cash. It’s entirely possible that, for cap purposes, the Falcons came up with a structure that keeps his number at $12.9 million. But the bottom line is that the Falcons wisely found a way to add to Jones’ bottom line.

So what about the idea that the Falcons have set a bad precedent by revising a contract that had three years remaining on it? If other Falcons players with three years left on their contracts want new deals, the Falcons merely need to say, “Play like Julio Jones and you’ll get one.”

Meanwhile, it probably didn’t help the team’s cause to announce on Wednesday that both coach Dan Quinn and G.M. Thomas Dimitroff have received new contracts despite having multiple years remaining on their current deals. If owner Arthur Blank can give them more when he technically doesn’t have to, Blank can do it with Jones as well.

And Blank did. How much more he gave Jones remains to be seen, and it inevitably will be.

18 responses to “Falcons did what they had to do to make Julio Jones happy

  1. This will only last until another player, who IS at the end of his contract, cashes in for the next biggie. Then Julio will be unhappy again. I get it that whoever that receiver is they will not (or highly unlikely) be as good as Julio, but if any player signs a long term contract to be the highest paid and thinks they will stay the highest paid over the length of that contract is kidding themselves. Their very own contract becomes the new baseline ither players negotiate against. So guys need yo find their peace with that.

  2. .
    ” Meanwhile, it probably didn’t help the team’s cause to announce on Wednesday that both coach Dan Quinn and G.M. Thomas Dimitroff have received new contracts despite having multiple years remaining on their current deals.”

    ———

    What the damn hell? Are these people idiots?
    .

  3. 4 TDs. Could have won the playoff game in the last seconds and came up short.

    Top 3 WR, but I wouldn’t have caved. I also wouldn’t have paid Ryan a ludicrous contract that hampers your entire cap, but hey…it is what it is. And hopefully, your players are all happy now.

  4. “So what about the idea that the Falcons have set a bad precedent by revising a contract that had three years remaining on it?”

    The Falcons didn’t set the precedent. It was set decades ago in 1993 by the likes of Emmitt Smith, who held out the first two games of that year, which the Cowboys lost. The team realized his value then and paid him and ended up still won the Super Bowl that year. The Falcons and Julio Jones didn’t break new ground. They played in the sandbox that the NFL and NFLPA created. It will work out for both of them.

    As for precedent on the team and other players watching? They, too, should hold out if they believe they have enough leverage. The end result will decide if they were right.

  5. Bad decision. Jones has been paid an average of $16.66m per year over the last 3 years. When he signed the contract he knew exactly how much he would be paid each year.

    He had to know that in the 4th year there would be several receivers making more than $10.5m yearly.

    I don’t believe he signed the contract in good faith and knew then he would start pushing for a new deal/holding out in 3 years.

  6. As soon as Dimitroff and Quinn got new deals, all the bells and whistles in peoples’ heads should have gone off. Of course Jones was getting a new one. Blank would have been roasted as a hypocrite and lost Julio and most of the players.

  7. jam11163 says:
    July 26, 2018 at 8:53 am
    Jones and Beckham are battling for the nfl’s biggest diva award.
    ————-

    I get so tired of you people using this term. Sakes alive.

  8. rparrott4 says:
    July 26, 2018 at 10:36 am
    So if players under-perform their contracts, can teams renegotiate them lower?

    —————–

    They can cut them, so yes.

  9. Their basing the adjustment on last seasons production? Then JJ should be paying them back instead of getting more. The coach and GM getting extensions is also a head scratcher. When they did that then they had to cave on JJ.

  10. rparrott4 says:
    July 26, 2018 at 10:36 am
    So if players under-perform their contracts, can teams renegotiate them lower?

    5 0 Rate This

    They do…and they cut guys too…all the time…Do you not follow the NFL?

  11. Mr. Wright 212 says:
    July 26, 2018 at 9:34 am
    jam11163 says:
    July 26, 2018 at 8:53 am
    Jones and Beckham are battling for the nfl’s biggest diva award.
    ————-

    I get so tired of you people using this term. Sakes alive.

    ———————
    Which term? ‘Battling’ or ‘NFL’?

  12. Surprised Julio would settle for 2 million. I mean Julio deserves at least 28.3 million just to carry that overrated cry baby QB through another season.

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