NFL must rewrite the new helmet rule, now

AP

The new helmet rules continue to be applied as written. Which will continue to make football something other than football.

In Saturday night’s game between the Chargers and Cardinals, a pair of fouls were called on Arizona players. One, a penalty called on safety A.J. Howard, wiped out a fumble that the Cardinals had recovered.

It was called an illegal hit on a defenseless receiver, but Chargers tight end Sean Culkin surely had the ball long enough to no longer be defenseless (indeed, he had the ball long enough to complete the process of making the catch). The far more likely reality is that Howard was flagged for lowering his helmet to initiate contact, which is precisely what he did.

But here’s the problem: What else could he have done? Watch the video; Howard tries to execute a form tackle in real time and at full speed. But he misses the mark and his helmet hits Culkin. As the rule is written, it should be a penalty every time.

It happened again, in the same game. Cardinals safety Travell Dixon, while apparently attempting to execute a form tackle, lowered his helmet and made contact with Chargers receiver Geremy Davis. The flag was thrown. Again, as the rule is written, it’s a foul.

Yes, referee Brad Allen has said that more of these fouls will be called during the preseason. But the rule says what it says, and the rule is being applied properly. The problem is that the non-football players who crafted the 21-word rule made it so broad that it will attempt to correct behavior that is, as a practical matter, uncorrectable within the confines of the way the game has been played, for decades.

Coaches should be concerned. Owners should be concerned. Executives should be concerned. The Commissioner should be concerned.

Someone hijacked the game in March by downplaying to the membership what this rule would do to the game, comparing it to the rule that prohibits the ramming of the top of the helmet into an opponent outside the tackle box. Players quickly stopped using that technique, because it was a specific, defined maneuver that was easily spotted, easily called, and easily abandoned.

This new rule is far broader, encompassing not only the intentional use of the helmet as a weapon but all inadvertent contact that occurs when one player who is moving collides with another player who is moving. And the smart thing to do would be to re-write the rule in a more narrow and precise way, to convene an emergency meeting of the owners (by phone if need be), and to ram through the revised rule the same way the first version of the rule was rammed through the league meetings in March.

Recent history suggests that the NFL would never be willing to admit its blunder and to take proper action, opting instead to keep its head down, to deny the existence of a serious problem, and to suggest that anyone who sees this rule as something that could make the game unwatchable and arbitrary is overreacting. (That “anyone” could soon be “everyone.”)

So get ready for a season that will quite possibly carry an asterisk for all the wrong reasons. It quite possibly will be the season in which ambiguity, happenstance, and random discretion ultimately have a significant role in who makes it to the playoffs and, ultimately, who wins the Super Bowl.

92 responses to “NFL must rewrite the new helmet rule, now

  1. But the NFL’s lawyer’s are very happy because now they can go into court and claim that the NFL is taking care of the players and that would make the league no longer financially responsible to head injuries going forward, so the owner’s (even if they don’t say it in public) are also very happy.

  2. Right on Florio. As usual the NFL’s “solution” is worse than the “problem” it’s trying (supposedly) to fix. Just admit that it’s posturing to show “see, we care about player safety” while in the meantime they are about to ruin the game once and for all. IDIOTS

  3. As a die hard Raiders fan, I have to admit that Jon Gruden is the most OVERRATED head coach in the history of the NFL. Look at his record: .537 winning percentage over his career highlighted by a Super Bowl win with another coach’s team and being the author of his Super Bowl opponents’s playbook.

  4. Reason number two that I cancelled my NFL ticket for this year. The game has become unwatchable, to me anyway. It’s unfortunate.

  5. While I agree with Florio on this one, I do not think it is posturing at all. Ill-thought out? Yes. But even if all business people, including the NFL were heartless, soulless people (which they are not) there are a lot of legitimate business reasons to want to solve the concussion problem. You only need to look at the settlement to understand that.

    But they went overboard. Happens all the time outside of the NFL. Will they fix it? I think yes because as Florio points out – this is untenable.

  6. The rule is NOT the problem. It’s the call. However, the rule can be amended to make it more clear so refs can figure it out. Instead of “lowers head” it should be “turns facemask to the ground to intentionally hit with the crown of the helmet.” The NFL has had “See What You Hit” on locker room posters since the 1980s. Looking down and using the top of the head can break the hitter’s neck. Hitting another player with the crown in the head can cause brain damage. Keep the facemask up so there’s a cushion. The refs need to get the rule right, because it’s a GOOD rule.
    .
    Let it be now known as the “Cardinal Rule?”

  7. Yes, referee Brad Allen has said that more of these fouls will be called during the preseason.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~
    That does absolutely nothing to fix the “problem” and the NFL does something stupid like this every year. If players know they will call it differently later on then why change behavior? They place “emphasis” on certain rules each year. By definition, the rules are not rules and penalties are arbitrarily enforced BY DESIGN. That is how you get plans like the Seahawks had a few years ago where they intentionally committed fouls early so the officials would feel like THEY were being overzealous and throw less flags like that later in the game.

    Make the rules make sense, ensure all officials know what is and is not a foul and then call EVERY penalty that is witnessed regardless of teams/players involved, score, game circumstances (final play, etc.), popularity or playoff impact. That will force us to endure long games until the players and coaches figure out they must play within the rules but it is the ONLY way to fix the crap we are seeing every year.

  8. The rule is so stupid. Players are already warned to hit other players with their face up and not with the top of the helmet, and as a player, you take it or leave it. If that player is dumb enough to continue to hit other players with the top of his helmet, it’s his funeral. Hit with your head up, and you’ll be fine.

  9. Would it not be easier to show a film to all players BEFORE they sign out of college, the film showing/explainiing that ya d head hits can cause different problems, hence the term “punchy” from the 1920’s. After film they sign off any lawsuits as they acknowledge risk, or they don’t play?

  10. To many lawyers and their convoluted BS.
    Goodell is right there with his pointed head, as usual.
    Clean out that nest of vipers in the NFL headquarters

  11. This has always been the inevitable result of lawyers running everything. They do what they do. It’s clear they are going to ruin the game over the obvious fact that ANYONE who is accomplished enough to make it in the league KNOWS this is a dangerous game. As such acceptance of the check shows acknowledgement of those dangers.

    Idiots have almost killed to golden goose over nothing.

  12. The NFL is making it up as they go along now. Just like they changed the rules in the Super Bowl to ignore that the Eagles “Philly Special” was done on an illegal formation, and the the Clement and Ertz TDs were not actual catches. As far as I am concerned, the Patriots won the Super Bowl, not the Eagles.

  13. You really expect the NFL to admit it made a mistake and correct this in short order? Really?

    Substantial pushback always results in Goodell and his cronies digging their heels in and making the situation far worse than it already was. This has happened over and over again.

    This rule will be a disaster, and used by the league to effect the outcome of games.

  14. Agreed, completely. As soon I saw the new rule, I knew it’s maker did not play football. I played the better part of my life and sometimes the lowering of the head borders on involuntary. Furthermore, sometimes it is almost impossible not to lower your head. Saying that the rule will be strongly enforced during the preseason simply highlights the fact that too much discretion is being given to officials. This discretion leads to inconsistencies. These inconsistencies cut to the heart of the sport’s credibility.

    As things stand, I know games will be decided based on the vagueries of the rule and its application.

  15. “As a die hard Raiders fan, I have to admit that Jon Gruden is the most OVERRATED head coach in the history of the NFL.”

    I’m no big fan of Gruden but Jeff Fisher and Marvin Lewis have him beat by miles and miles.

  16. The refs have been making atrocious misinterpretations of unnecessary roughness and stopped forward progress rules for years (see 2012 NFC championship decided by bogus forward progress call). So gray area rules have ruined Football for a while and given refs free reign to decide games for whichever team they have rooting interest. Now they are fully backed by another gray rule. Much more difficult to argue against their judgement bc the ambiguity of the rule basically covers anything they decide.

  17. If the NFL claifies the rule then how will they justify the penalty when needed to hand the Patriots the game. Now that I think about it, they never needed it before so why start?

  18. The other problem is that teams that ALWAYS get the benefit of good calls for them and bad for the opponent, ie the Packers and Patriots – will benefit even more.

  19. I think the Ref’s , Line Judges, and other field officials all should kneel in protest of this new Helmet Rule Headache..!!!

  20. The NFL is officially dead to me.

    Maybe the young kids can catch on, but I doubt it. There too worried about “Likes”!

    For us old timers that loved the game, it’s over.

  21. When you make a good form tackle, you lead with your head. You don’t hit with the head. But you lead with it to get leverage so you not only tackle but drive the guy backwards. You can’t not lead with your head. It’s a natural movement.

    The rule was idiotic from the beginning and was a horrible idea that represented the continued decline of the game in favor of quarterbacks and receivers building phantom stats. All the wimpy quarterbacks in this game now rely on rules like this. Quarterbacks before 2010 wouldn’t be in favor of such nonsense.

  22. How sad to see that commenters would rather see paralyzed players and ex-players with CTE then see a rule changed that would protect their favorite players. The guy with the jersey you’re wearing may wind up in a wheelchair with drool running down his face or in a murder-suicide, but don’t let them stop hitting people in the head with a bowling ball. Man…

  23. raiderej says:
    August 12, 2018 at 5:36 pm
    As a die hard Raiders fan, I have to admit that Jon Gruden is the most OVERRATED head coach in the history of the NFL. Look at his record: .537 winning percentage over his career highlighted by a Super Bowl win with another coach’s team and being the author of his Super Bowl opponents’s playbook.
    —————————————————————————————-
    That would be true in the case of Jimmy Johnson/ Barry Switizer , Dungy was fired for not being able to get a Super Bowl caliber team there, Gruden took what an over-rated coach like Dungy couldn’t do and cashed in, see the difference.

  24. Because the media demands a new rule right Florio?
    Admit it, no matter what the NFL does to minimize risk and liability, the media will NEVER be satisfied.

  25. Florio wrote, “It quite possibly will be the season in which ambiguity, happenstance, and random discretion ultimately have a significant role in who makes it to the playoffs and, ultimately, who wins the Super Bowl.”

    ********************************************************************************

    Oh, goooood. Just in time for legalized sports wagering — this won’t cause any controversies (which, by the way, more and more evidence suggests the NFL intentionally creates — all buzz is good buzz).

  26. Pretty sure that the half a billion they’ve paid out for CTE and seeing Shazier stretched out after a helmet down tackle was a great motivator in this rule. Doesn’t take much to tweak it, but I get the intent.

  27. gridassassin says:
    August 12, 2018 at 6:08 pm
    The other problem is that teams that ALWAYS get the benefit of good calls for them and bad for the opponent, ie the Packers and Patriots – will benefit even more.

    —————

    Is that the excuse you are going with to explain why your team stinks?

  28. briang123 says:
    August 12, 2018 at 5:54 pm
    The NFL is making it up as they go along now. Just like they changed the rules in the Super Bowl to ignore that the Eagles “Philly Special” was done on an illegal formation, and the the Clement and Ertz TDs were not actual catches. As far as I am concerned, the Patriots won the Super Bowl, not the Eagles.

    ————-

    You’re logic is seriously flawed. It was not illegal formation on the Philly Special since Jeffrey pointed to the ref and the ref gave the thumbs up sign (that means it wasn’t a flag, should he of gave the okay is a different question alltogether). As far as the Clement and Ertz TDs… if you really think that the Ertz one wasn’t a TD, where he caught it at the 6, turned, took 3 steps, and then dove across the pylon… You’re an idiot.
    If the process of the catch takes more than 6 yards to complete, something is wrong. As far as Clements TD… loss of control and ball movement are two different things. I swear football fans and media are the dumbest people in the world lol.

  29. Totally agree, Mikey, especially with your definition of “broad” application of this rule, and “broad” definition. Kinda reminds me of TSA’s definition of “terrorist”–someone who does not want to be groped!

  30. This rule is just another way for the NFL to dictate outcomes in the name of “player” safety. The refs can’t get holding right how do you expect them to call this correctly?

  31. I’m all for player safety. My personal enjoyment isn’t based upon “old school” football where the players destroy one another and I get a cheap thrill at home. That said, the new rule is a disaster. How about simply using common sense discretion? The referees surely knew what a catch was when they saw one. I suspect they were only basing their catch rule based on the way it was defined in the rulebook. In this case, most people can agree on when a player is head hunting and when there’s incidental contact. The referees won’t get it right 100 percent of the time, but I have no doubt that they have a good understanding of when there’s true intent. Put the power in the hands of the referees and don’t handcuff them by making them to enforce the rule as it is written.

  32. The NFL will slowly kill itself. Stop trying to legislate the game and learn to accept the inherent dangers or avoid playing it.

    Hers an idea… offer the players better health care after football so they can deal with the adverse effects of playing the game.

  33. This rule as written and being enforced in this first week of preseason is terrible. It would be best to adopt the targeting rule from the college game. The new kickoff rule doesn’t look like football either. I don’t recognize this game anymore that I love and enjoyed on Sunday afternoons for well over 25 years.

  34. “The NFL is making it up as they go along now. Just like they changed the rules in the Super Bowl to ignore that the Eagles ‘Philly Special’ was done on an illegal formation, and the the Clement and Ertz TDs were not actual catches. As far as I am concerned, the Patriots won the Super Bowl, not the Eagles.”

    Yeah, keep crying.

  35. What the owners should is let the players make those kind of rules… That way they relieve themselves of most of the liability.

  36. Everyone knows this is a vicious game. They choose to play for millions. No one makes them. Let the return to the old rule and add the information regarding the risks involved. Have them sign they understand and have read the information. Problem solved. They choose to take the millions instead then that’s their choice. Also, aren’t the majority of the CTE cases from the line players, who can still whack their heads all game long?

    On a better note, there’s no fair better than the Erie County Fair. Great day and even better week ahead. #justenjoylife

  37. The NFL has been slowly ruining football for the past ten years, this is par for the course. Nobody wants to see the players get hurt or develop serious conditions later in life. But at this point everyone knows the risks, just let those who are willing play the game.

  38. P. J. Casselman says:
    August 12, 2018 at 6:21 pm
    How sad to see that commenters would rather see paralyzed players and ex-players with CTE then see a rule changed that would protect their favorite players. The guy with the jersey you’re wearing may wind up in a wheelchair with drool running down his face or in a murder-suicide, but don’t let them stop hitting people in the head with a bowling ball. Man…
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    Are you intentionally making dumb comparisons to make people mad or do really believe what you just wrote? It seems you have missed the point of the backlash. It has nothing at all to do with witnessing carnage, a false sense of protecting the players or short/long-term injuries. The complaints are about losing the game itself. The game cannot be played with a rule written that way. Try it yourself. Stand upright or crouch down (doesn’t matter). Now try to wrap your arms around something in front of you or hit something with your shoulder without your head leading the way. I won’t say it is impossible because some people may be able to crane their neck backward far enough to technically do it but the injuries you seem to be worried about would drastically increase. It is a stupid rule that is poorly written. The purpose almost seems to be the creation of a rule that can easily be called on any play in order to manipulate the game in various ways. What, the unpopular team got a first down and may win the game and keep a popular team from making the playoffs? Flag on the play…leading with helmet…3rd and 25.

  39. Baloney. He lowered is head and initiated contact with the crown of his helmet. Had he broken his neck, you hypocrite, you’d have been screaming for another rule change.

  40. It’s the beginning of the end. Every decision this league makes seems to be the wrong one. The incompetence of the people running this league is unbelievable. This ridiculous new rule could be my breaking point. The flags will be unbearable

  41. Also now with legalized betting….what a huge problem to try to track to ensure its still somewhat fairly played

  42. “briang123 says:
    August 12, 2018 at 5:54 pm
    The NFL is making it up as they go along now. Just like they changed the rules in the Super Bowl to ignore that the Eagles “Philly Special” was done on an illegal formation, and the the Clement and Ertz TDs were not actual catches. As far as I am concerned, the Patriots won the Super Bowl, not the Eagles.”

    you must be new to watching football. the only one which is even a question is the Clement catch, and if you watch the NFL films doc “Super Bowl 52 like you have never seen it” on YouTube, you can hear the ref explain why the movement is not loss of control.

    You could also say that the Pats got away with blatant PI 3 times….on the INT off the deflection, and twice in the end zone on 2 point attempts. All 3 times they literally pinned the reciever’s arm before the ball got there. But, truth is, the Pats had a chance to win it with 5 minutes left and couldn’t get it done. It’s that simple.

  43. The problem is that the non-football players who crafted the 21-word rule made it so broad that it will attempt to correct behavior that is, as a practical matter, uncorrectable within the confines of the way the game has been played, for decades.

    this is exactly the way the NFL approaches everything. Make it so convoluted that any body can make it into anything they want foul no foul. write an anthem rule that makes it no rule at all because it has so many options and easy outs….

  44. I just thought on something
    Putting your helmet on the ball technique?

    You know, to dislodge the ball…. Cause a fumble?
    Would this be in the same category as using your helmet to tackle?

    And how will they determine if one is diving for a first down touchdown & simultaneously the tackler is going for a strip & their helmets make contact, who’s at fault?

    It’s just too controversial & will change almostbevery aspect of football as its known today

    Not to diminish the seriousness of this,
    (Ryan Shazier & all others who suffered head, neck, back, spinal injury)
    But football is on its way to resemble WWE etc

  45. You’ll get over it, Mike. As will everyone else that watches purely for brutality, as opposed to the game itself. People should learn more about what they are watching and not just be satisfied by savagery.

  46. FinFan68, in response to your post: (since my other is still in moderation?)

    I played football in high school and college. I’ve also coached. I’m not saying you should stand like a tackling dummy and try to wrap your arms around a player.
    The Cardinals-Chargers call was a BAD CALL by the ref. That was a perfect form tackle. The rule is to keep players from going vertical and crashing into their opponents with the crown of their head (like the Titans did to Kelce). It’s like being hit with a bowling ball.
    Of course a players head is going to lower when they get low and of course it’s going to come up when they tackle. The rule was made so they don’t keep their neck horizontal to the ground (i.e. spearing). The Charger player led with his shoulder. It was a clean hit.
    As to my agitating remarks: I see a lot of people saying football is over. They didn’t hit with the crown of the head back in the 60’s and 70’s. Was Butkus affected by it? He was a monster without spearing.
    I never saw a lot of spearing until the late 1990s. Refs stopped calling it for the most part. Now they’re trying to get a handle on it and NFL fans are saying the sky is falling. They need this rule, but it has to be tweaked. I don’t want to see another Junior Seau or some of the others who lost it after football due to CTE. So this rule is necessary. Here are some of the players who died due to CTE:
    110 out of 111 brains of those who died early after the NFL had CTE. That’s why they’re trying to iron out this rule. Fans need to be patient instead of saying they’re done with football and other crazy stuff. They said the same thing about leather helmets (no I’m not that old, close, but not).

  47. dkcjb says:
    August 12, 2018 at 7:01 pm
    Crazy new rule + legalized gambling = hmmm…?
    ———

    Hmmm…..what? Are you insinuating that now that gambling Is legal the refs plan to use a “crazy new rule” to fix more games? people who fix games don’t gamble legally, because legal bets are too easy to track.

  48. I would be possible to mandate all tackles be made the hands and forarms.

    It would be a a whole different game – but its actually possible.

    But do we want that?

  49. P. J. Casselman, spearing has been banned for as long as I’ve been a fan. The new rule is written poorly and after seeing some of the flags thrown is being taken literally. There are few tackling fundamentals on display at the NFL level. Too many players use the helmet as a weapon (flag THAT) or launch their shoulders or back into the runner to try and knock them down like a bowling pin. This rule does nothing to protect a player. No rule does as the penalty is always assessed after the fact. In other words, the damage must already be done for there to be a penalty called. The yellow hanky on the field has never stopped or corrected an injury. You cannot take contact out of a contact sport and still have what’s left considered the same sport. I don’t mean that in the extreme. This rule seems to have been spawned by Shazier’s issue. In his case, he lowered his head and used that as the only point of contact (IIRC) and the impact was concentrated at a bad angle. His injury is unfortunate and tragic but what this rule says is absurd and offers little in the way of discretion, yet, discretion is what is expected by the league. If the league were serious about fixing the issue about using the helmet as a weapon, they should take the weapon away. Give them leather or make them out of spongy foam so the player would not even consider those hits.

  50. dartwick says:
    August 12, 2018 at 11:17 pm
    I would be possible to mandate all tackles be made the hands and forearms.
    It would be a a whole different game – but its actually possible.
    But do we want that?
    ———————
    It’s not about what we want anymore.
    The NFL is headed down the road of Tabacco, oil and guns.

    To them it’s an evil product, but the PC crowd won’t ban it. They just manipulate it so that it’s painful to use.

  51. jeremy x says:
    August 12, 2018 at 9:20 pm
    I just thought on something
    Putting your helmet on the ball technique?

    You know, to dislodge the ball…. Cause a fumble?
    Would this be in the same category as using your helmet to tackle?

    And how will they determine if one is diving for a first down touchdown & simultaneously the tackler is going for a strip & their helmets make contact, who’s at fault?

    It’s just too controversial & will change almostbevery aspect of football as its known today

    Not to diminish the seriousness of this,
    (Ryan Shazier & all others who suffered head, neck, back, spinal injury)
    But football is on its way to resemble WWE etc

    Do you know how many WWE “retirees” can barely walk right now? I’ve met many formers and more than a couple are a mess. Yes, the outcome is arranged but just for giggles go ahead and get in a ring with one of those guys and then tell us it’s all fake.
    And Shazier is exactly the type of player that caused this rule to be born. Absent dirty hits we’re not having this conversation. I hope he fully recovers but it’s hard to feel sorry for a guy who goes out of his way to put himself and others in unnecessary danger. The weirder part is that he’s been deified for nearly killing himself.

  52. “Howard tries to execute a form tackle in real time and at full speed.”

    —-

    A perfect form tackle includes looking / seeing your target, not the ground. He also didn’t appear to make any attempt to use his shoulder.

    This is a classic “put your hat on the ball” tackle …

  53. Every day I am amazed at how the management of the NFL is so utterly incompetent. They cannot do anything right. They messed up Ray Rice. They messed up the Anthem. They don’t know what a catch is. They can’t figure out what a first down is. Now they have a rule where a penalty could be called on every single tackle. It’s very sad to watch the leading league in the sport I love slowly commit suicide.

  54. Wow, who could have seen this rule would be an absolute debacle, other than every NFL fan the moment it was announced.
    When the books are written doing an autopsy on how Goodell and the owners killed the NFL, this rule change may get its own chapter.

  55. Good article! What a disastrous cluster**** when even with all the webinars, fact sheets & attempts at explanation, NOBODY can articulate a rule in a manner that is clearly understood by virtually anybody that matters!
    It’s really pathetic that these big time owners and executives can’t communicate any clearer in stating a simple rule…or maybe they should get some of the more articulate players on board to assist in the crafting of these changes as they are the ones who really understand how things work in real game situations occurring in real time.
    The thought that a player could conceivably be ejected, suspended, or fined, over a rule nobody understands is setting the tone for a stormy season ahead.
    Fans are getting tired of paying ridiculous prices to have to endure a new Keystone Cop routine every season and perhaps these “smart guys” should consider the quality of their product before blaming anthem issues, etc. for a decline in fan interest and sagging ticket sales.
    (The Cardinal/Charger game took something like three and a half hours to play with all the confusion on the field!)

  56. “But the NFL’s lawyer’s are very happy because now they can go into court and claim that the NFL is taking care of the players and that would make the league no longer financially responsible to head injuries going forward”
    ________________

    Surely that is their thinking. But will that really hold up in court? The penalties only come after the plays have occurred so there the only reduction in the number of such hits would be as the result of guys changing their style of play to avoid penalties. That allows anybody filing a suit to argue that, penalty or not, hits like that are common. The penalties will even give them actual numbers to cite in the lawsuit. And if the rules are so broad as to make changing style of play basically impossible there’ll be no reduction in such hits at all. This is a classic example of the NFL looking for a quick fix and failing to fix anything and potentially making the problem worse.

  57. ispeakthetruthraiders says:
    August 12, 2018 at 5:45 pm
    This author knows what everyone involved in the NFL should be doing so why don’t they hire you?

    ——————————————-

    With this mindset, we’d all be hired by the NFL by now. lol.

  58. Yes, referee Brad Allen has said that more of these fouls will be called during the preseason. But the rule says what it says, and the rule is being applied properly. The problem is that the non-football players who crafted the 21-word rule made it so broad that it will attempt to correct behavior that is, as a practical matter, uncorrectable within the confines of the way the game has been played, for decades.
    ___________________________________________________

    I don’t understand this, why would there be more called in the pre-season? Call it now how you’re going to call it when games count

  59. The simplest fix would be to get rid of helmets altogether. Rugby players don’t suffer brain injuries like NFL players do and every last one of us played at least 1,000 games of backyard football without helmets and we seem to have survived (mostly) unscathed.

    When you see players warming up and head-butting each other, do you think they’d do that without a helmet? Not likely. The helmets provide a false sense of security and as I’ve said numerous times, helmets are designed to protect the skull, not the brain.

  60. my 2 favorite things have gone 2 chit… star wars n the nfl from da 70s…long 4 the good ole days

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