NFL may have overcorrected, post-Ezekiel Elliott

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The Ray Rice fiasco, which nearly brought sweeping and dramatic change to the league office, sparked the NFL to respond in a way that would avoid future P.R. debacles. And then, in the opinion of at least one influential owner, the NFL went too far the other way, creating problems when there officially otherwise were none.

Less than two years after Ray Rice, the NFL launched an aggressive investigation regarding allegations of domestic violence against Cowboys running back Ezekiel Elliott. The league eventually imposed a six-game suspension on Elliott, even though he was never criminally charged or civilly sued. The procedures, which included a half-dozen private interviews of the alleged victim, included no opportunity for Elliott to confront or question the accuser, and featured at least one league investigator who believed that Elliott should not be suspended.

The situation greatly angered Cowboys owner Jerry Jones, and it fueled a persistent, creative, and stunning effort by Jones in 2017 to block the Commissioner’s contract extension, with the ultimate goal of securing a new Commissioner.

And so, in the immediate aftermath of the Commissioner getting his extension, it appears that the league may have softened its stern, unforgiving approach to off-field misconduct, an approach that ignored all efforts of law enforcement and drilled down on the facts and circumstances with the goal of reaching a conclusion as to whether the player did what he was accused of doing, under a much lower standard of proof than beyond a reasonable doubt. How else can anyone explain the fact that soon-to-be-former Chiefs running back Kareem Hunt: (1) was accused of shoving a woman in February 2018; (2) nothing seemed to happen over an extended period of time, even though the alleged victim clearly was motivated to receive some sort of justice or satisfaction; and (3) nearly 10 months later, a video of the incident suddenly emerges and Hunt is immediately suspended with pay by the league and then fired without pay by his team?

The league says it never saw the video before TMZ published it. Privately, the contention is that multiple attempts were made to obtain the video, that the hotel refused to provide the video to the NFL, and that the Cleveland Police Department likewise didn’t provide the video. (Others are reporting these contentions as facts. They aren’t facts; they are contentions that may or may not ultimately be supported by facts.)

Whatever the contentions or private explanations, here’s the reality: If the league learned anything from the Ray Rice case, it learned that it must do anything and everything to track down any and all available video of any alleged incident involving a player, because it always must be assumed that the video eventually will be obtained by TMZ. And if the league opted not to do that in Hunt’s case, the only explanation (other than gross incompetence) is that the NFL has decided to search for a middle ground between Rice and Elliott, one that entails swift and decisive action when required along with a commitment to focusing only on football unless and until the hand of the Shield is forced.

If that’s the compromise, it may not be the right one. Because it may not be enough to suddenly say, “Oh, there’s video? We tried to get the video but no one would give us the video. Well, now that there’s video, that changes everything.”

As a multi-billion-dollar operation that is far bigger and more powerful than TMZ, it’s fairly presumed that the league has the ability to get anything that TMZ is able to get. And if the NFL doesn’t have the current internal expertise to get videos that TMZ seems to always obtain, maybe the NFL needs to hire someone from TMZ to help the NFL figure out how to get those videos.

That’s the biggest flaw in the balance the NFL currently seems to be trying to strike. Given the power of video, the league should always be relentless when it comes to tracking down any and all video of any player incident, since it always should be assumed that the video will inevitably emerge.

65 responses to “NFL may have overcorrected, post-Ezekiel Elliott

  1. Just because they are bigger than TMZ does not mean they are better at finding dirt or acquiring video. That is all of TMZ’s job! Maybe TMZ just paid the most?

    Whole issue is crazy, crazy!

  2. Here we go with the media’s defense of poor innocent Kareem Hunt.
    The NFL has every right to defend its brand and to discipline its employees.
    Why hasn’t De Smith and the NFLPA disciplined Hunt yet?
    Worse yet, why hasn’t the media asked the NFLPA for a comment on Hunt’s woman beating?

  3. you think the nfl doesnt have more money, people, resources, lawyers, than TMZ?
    The NFL had the video im sure, they just thought no one else would ever see it

  4. Zeke got suspended partly because (it only later emerged) the phone logs and electronic media he supposedly handed in to “prove” his innocence had in fact been heavily redacted by him to exclude all meaningful interactions with the woman. And also partly because of the breast-exposing episode. And maybe the NFL also reconsidered his openly buying drugs in Seattle hours before a preseasoner there (something they and Boys previously turned a blind eye to).

  5. According to ESPN, “Sources told ESPN’s Adam Schefter that neither the NFL nor the Chiefs had viewed the video before it became public Friday. The league made multiple attempts to obtain it. The hotel told NFL representatives that it was corporate policy to turn video over only to law enforcement and therefore could not provide it to the league.

    The NFL also contacted the Cleveland Police Department, which did not provide the league any video. Even though no charges were filed by law enforcement, the NFL continued its investigation, which included contacting the victims of the alleged incident, but they did not respond to multiple messages.”
    ==============================

    Please tell me what other LEGAL means does the league have in trying to obtain the video? Do you seriously believe a large corporation would try to bribe a low-level hotel security guard to make a copy of the video like TMZ did?

  6. We have stand your ground laws in this country. That means you might see a video of someone harming another or even shooting them, but they can get away with it after an investigation proves that they were protecting themselves. I didn’t any video of the activities that led to Kareem’s retaliation. I didn’t make up the laws, I’m just reciting them. How do I know Kareem is innocent? I don’t. I don’t know that he’s guilty either. That’s why we have lawyers and courts.

  7. Or, its just more of the random NFL “justice” that is nothing but overreaction when things become public knowledge, double standards and which teams are Goodell’s favorites list. It has nothing to do with having learned or not learned from the Ray Rice and Elliott incidents

  8. Do we want the NFL to be paying cash for the video footage either buying it from hotel management who copied this footage but waited a full 10 months before selling it to TMZ or from someone in the police department who had the tapes in their possession this entire time.

    Just say for instance it was someone w some ties to the police department who sold the tape to TMZ do we want the NFL to negotiate and buy the tape. Then what happens when they have the tape do they destroy it. Do they release it to the public no way.

    Also do u really think that whoever gave the footage to TMZ would ever even try to sell the tape to the NFL? Really? If I had the tape or footage I certainly would never call the NFL or Chiefs TMZ is the obvious place to call as they have a television show and they also have a full division of their work dedicated to a separate sister company all devoted to sports and this exact type of situation.

    This was not some kind of thing that was on an online auction on the black web where the NFL had the opportunity to buy it but got outbid this is footage someone was in possession of that figured they could make a nice chunk of money and went to TMZ seeking them to sell the footage.

  9. Lots of moving parts on this one. Hunt lied. If he had told the truth he might have saved his job. The NFL is seriously incompetent and they continue to shoot themselves in the foot everytime they try to police one of these situations…

  10. Like u said it’s only being reported that the NFL asked the police who are the ones in custody of the tapes to get a copy and were denied and it hasn’t been proven as fact yet but it makes sense.

    It’s not a good look at all for the police in this whole thing at all and I doubt that department wanted this tape out. The women wanted to press charges and at the very LEAST the should just taken him into custody booked him and let the courts handle it. The police are not the legal system they aren’t the judge juror or sentencers.

    The police as they should look after their own and anything w a high profile person in a situation like this is going to bring a ton of scrutiny to their department and actions in this case and I don’t c any instance they would voluntarily give anyone including the NFL this footage not just of Hunt but also we are also seeing up close shots now of all the officers on the scene.

  11. streetyson says:
    December 1, 2018 at 10:51 am
    Zeke got suspended partly because (it only later emerged) the phone logs and electronic media he supposedly handed in to “prove” his innocence had in fact been heavily redacted by him to exclude all meaningful interactions with the woman. And also partly because of the breast-exposing episode. And maybe the NFL also reconsidered his openly buying drugs in Seattle hours before a preseasoner there (something they and Boys previously turned a blind eye to).
    —————————————–

    Goodell, is that you?

    Also, your last sentence is 100% factually incorrect. Zeke Elliott was caught on video VISITING a pot store. He did not buy anything, and it is perfectly reasonable to be curious about a newly legalized pot store.

    I also never heard about any redacted text messages. I do remember a text message from Zeke’s accuser to one of her friends telling them to lie to the police for her.

    You’ve got some strange filtered glasses, there.

  12. “We have stand your ground laws in this country. That means you might see a video of someone harming another or even shooting them, but they can get away with it after an investigation proves that they were protecting themselves”.
    ——————————————-

    This argument doesn’t work for Hunt. After entering a hotel room, he makes the decision to come back out and confront the woman again. It wasn’t a choice of self defense. He had the opportunity to walk away. Took it. Then walked back into the situation

  13. The NFL has no authority to command a subpoena or obtain the video footage from the police authority or hotel. They can request for the video but neither police or Hotel have to comply.

  14. I must reiterate this…
    WHY is the NFL being held accountable for anything?
    Did Goodell or the NFL beat a woman on video?
    No they did not. A player did.
    WHY don’t you people focus your vitriol on Hunt?
    Do you not think that the NFLPA also knew? Of COURSE they knew!
    Do you not think that Hunt’s agent knew? Of COURSE he knew!
    But Hunt, the NFLPA, and Hunt’s agent remained silent…but ya’ll demand that the NFL be held accountable. All of these parties have a stake and interest in keeping this event from seeing the light of day. ALL of them!
    I will bet 5 years salary that the NFLPA used back channels to tell the NFL that if they dared to do anything to Hunt, that the NFLPA and its media lapdogs, would ignite a firestorm over Goodell and the NFL.
    That is EXACTLY what is happening right now and ya’ll are falling for it hook, line, and sinker.
    Guess who is not being portrayed as the bad guy(s)? Everyone who knew – Hunt, his agent, and the NFLPA.
    Get a clue and focus your vitriol on the perp, his agent, and his union.representation!

  15. Those that are convinced of Zeke’s guilt all (100%) did not read the official police report, which contained the copies of testimony and evidence. That’s the only way you can “come to the conclusion” that he was guilty – by willfully ignoring the mountain of evidence.

    I wonder if it has anything to do with not liking the Cowboys in general? Objectivity…

    I also love how the best “evidence” that he committed the physical abuse/etc is that he went into a drug store in Seattle. He must have committed the crime because he has done stupid (yet not criminal) things.

  16. All these issues in the front office have occured under the watch of one commissioner. I get that Goodell is more or less a puppet on strings for the owners but he has gone rogue and utilized his commissioner powers against the wishes of the owners on numerous occasions. Most recently with the anthem debacle, and of course in his adjudication of the Zeke case. He needs to go, owners can find another empty suit to sit at 345.

  17. sportoficionado says:
    December 1, 2018 at 11:30 am

    All these issues in the front office have occured under the watch of one commissioner. I get that Goodell is more or less a puppet on strings for the owners but he has gone rogue and utilized his commissioner powers against the wishes of the owners on numerous occasions. Most recently with the anthem debacle, and of course in his adjudication of the Zeke case. He needs to go, owners can find another empty suit to sit at 345.
    ___________________________________________________________

    Based on what you stated, I must assume that you are 100% against any discipline of the players whatsoever.
    Do NOT forget that these players enjoy TWO facets of legal representation, their agent (a lawyer) and their union (NFLPA attorneys). Therefore they have the maximum level of legal defense possible.
    Also, players are grown men who make their own choices. Many of them CHOOSE to commit crimes against women.
    Your statement implys that NFLPA players should never be disciplined by the NFL in any manner whatsoever. Basically stating that law enforcement should choose to prosecute players, or not, and the NFL should stay out of it.
    The problem is that in today’s 24/7 media environment, when a player commits a crime, the media runs to the NFL NOT the player, for comments on the players crime. Therefore, the NFL and its brand (and value) is damaged by the negative publicity caused by the PLAYER.
    I 100% disagree with you. The NFL, and its franchises should have every right to discipline its employees as it sees fit.

  18. This is so crap. The NFL couldn’t get the video but TMZ could? And the Cleveland cops? The hotel? This was a pure cover up from the get. Lots of money was paid for silence, until now.

  19. sportoficionado says: “All these issues in the front office have occured under the watch of one commissioner.”
    =================================

    HOF Warren Moon beat his wife and his son called 911 to report it. What did commissioner Tabliabue do? Nothing. No suspension. No fine. Just another day of football. Seriously, is that what you want again?

    Goodell is trying to impose a standard of conduct for his employees. Something that’s NEVER happened before. But sure, let’s criticize the only NFL commissioner that’s trying to clean up player behaviour.

  20. People (or have a lawyer) call TMZ to see whatever what is worth.

    The cops said they needed a court order. As a retired detective, that means the Hotel refused to give it up (Payday?).

    She wants him arrested on a he said/she said where she probably had no visible marks and was not related to him. That makes it a non arrest. No proof or corroborating witness.

    Business’s that have video use the same cycle. The stuff gets erased within 1 day to 1 week. SO WHO SAVED IT? Why not give it to the police, at least AFTER watching it. You just PAID the woman BIGTIME. You withheld evidence in a crime that lacked said evidence. She stumbled and had an apparent concussion. Any idiot knows a crime was committed. Payday? Yeah, your Hotel is going to be paying.

    If I’m the detective assigned to the case, that is where I start. Who was working, who had access, etc etc. Check a few bank accounts and phone records. ID everyone involved.

    All said and done it is a Misdemeanor without a hospital record of a serious physical injury. She didn’t have one. She was also aggressive and might not get that much from Hunt because of how civil court works.

    It would have been way easier had the video been seen that night. Arrest made (maybe even her too). That’s on the Hotel unless the cops flat out lied. I know when I wanted to see a video, I got control of it.

  21. TMZ pays for the videos, they’re not free. And whomever shoots them knows that and can lawyer up to negotiate with TMZ to get their best price. Simple, if NFL is willing to pay they’ll get the videos.

  22. The NFL does not want to clean their act up, continued stroking bad character and not making any player accountable for their actions, This is not a Godel thing this is owners and coaches not getting together at their meeting and finally look like men and stop the actions of to many players in the NFL today.

  23. According to businessinsider TMZ really doesn’t pay very much to acquire these videos. Here are some examples of their cost.

    “For footage of former NFL player Ray Rice dragging the unconscious body of his fiancée, Janay Palmer, from an Atlantic City elevator in 2014, the source was paid $15,000.”

    “For footage of Drake in 2014 throwing money outside a Washington strip club, the source asked to be paid $5,000.”

    “A former TMZ employee told The New Yorker that they paid close to $5,000 for footage of Solange Knowles attacking brother-in-law Jay Z in an elevator at the Standard hotel in New York City in 2014, while her sister Beyonce stood by.”

  24. The NFL likely was only interested in obtaining the video via “official” sources. TMZ on the other hand is likely willing to obtain the video from whoever is willing to give it up.

    If the NFL relied upon non-public, stolen information (aka the video in question before it was made public by TMZ), to suspend a player, there is an argument that the player may be able to get the suspension overturned in court.

    Elliott was suspended 6 games without being sued in civil court, likely because he likely settled with the accuser out of court before she had the opportunity to do so.

  25. “It wasn’t a choice of self defense. He had the opportunity to walk away. Took it. Then walked back into the situation”

    And kicked her when she was down and not making any further attempt to come at him. Childish and cowardly.

    “I must reiterate this…
    WHY is the NFL being held accountable for anything?
    Did Goodell or the NFL beat a woman on video?
    No they did not. A player did.
    WHY don’t you people focus your vitriol on Hunt?”

    Because the league has made a big deal about supposedly coming down on domestic violence and violence in general. Now they seem to be complicit in covering up this incident. When you say you’re against something and then seem to have helped cover up an incident related to that, you’re going to get a lot of criticism.

  26. I absolutely believe Zeke was a victim of Ray Rice. The NFL completely blew the Ray Rice decision. Rice got away with a slap on the wrist. Public opinion was outraged by the lack of punishment Rice got. The NFL was determined to not let that happen again so everyone since is guilty. You must be able to prove, without a shadow of a doubt, that you are innocent of all charges. You are not given the benefit of a doubt. You have to prove you innocent, or your guilty in the eyes of the NFL. It’s like the difference between being charged in a criminal or civil court. In a criminal court, they have to prove you guilty, in a civil court you are likely to have to prove you’re innocent depending on the charge.

    In Zeke’s case, evidence proved inconclusive. A case could be made either way, but nothing was conclusive. So it was a he said, she said thing. That’s why the police didn’t charge anyone. The NFL was provided the same evidence. The NFL hired a female prosecutor to investigate the incident. She and the NFL were determined to make an example out of Zeke to correct the NFL mistake they made in Ray Rice’s case. Zeke got what Ray didn’t.

  27. PFT is spot on. The NFL despite all its assists and
    it’s abilty to hire the lawyers continues to screw up
    it’s investigations.
    It is puzzling how,as powerful the league is,
    that the league cannot gain acccess to a video.
    It’s seems as if the league has different standards
    in thier investigations. In the Elliot case they had
    one of there own employees, an investigator,
    interview the victim personally. In addition the league
    seemed to have collected a good amount of evidence.
    In the Josh Brown case the local police authority received
    an innoculous email from a NFL hired investigator .
    The email request to the local police did not identify the
    that the sender was acting on behalf of the NFL.
    The Brown incident occurred within 50 miles of
    the NFL ‘s headquarters.
    In this Hunt case and in Rice as well as the Brown case the
    NFL’s investigators almost seemed as if they did not want to
    open Pandora’s box and actually gain negative evidence.
    In Brady and Elliot the NFL seemed to have no,limits on their efforts
    to gain evidence against the Patriots and Cowboys players.
    The problem iit seems is once again, Roger Goodell. He refuses
    to give up his power. If he gave up the power to an independent
    party who could conduct investigations on a level playing field
    it worild remove mistakes and undfair bias. Fans would not wonder
    why the NFL seems to be aggressive against owners like Jones but
    Not aggressive against owners like the Mara’s.

  28. Why should the NFL enter into a bidding war with TMZ to get the video? If someone tells your boss they heard you hit your wife but the police came out and did nothing do you think they should hire someone to come and investigate and talk to your neighbors and see if they have video for sale? Don`t be a hypocrite. Once the proof was out there the NFL and the Chiefs did the right thing so i don`t see the problem with innocent until proven guilty and then paying the price when guilt is proven. And i`m not saying the woman did nothing wrong either because she probably did but that doesn`t excuse being so out of control you come back and kick her while she`s down after a full minute of people restraining you. That`s just being out of control and that is on him and nobody else.

  29. I am amused by the comments that think because the NFL is a multi-billion enterprise it should be able to get these videos that TMZ can get. The reason the NFL can’t get them is BECAUSE it is a multi-billion dollar enterprise. They can’t lie, bribe or steal to get the information like TMZ can. The fact that this video was released publicly is most likely a crime of some type. TMZ probably paid a private contractor for the video so they are insulated to some degree. The NFL could never do this.

  30. PFT is correct. Now I do not think the NFL saw the video . . . look the NFL is the epitome of a corporate structure. That old school HR mindset is not pro-active. It is not investigative. It deals with what is put in front of them. They do not think in terms of paying hotel IT guys to steal video and sell it to them. Yes the NFL is more powerful than TMZ, but– and I don’t mean this bad– TMZ is far shadier. I’m they will pay someone for video. The NFL does not think of it that way. They ask. They are told no. They wait.

    The NFL is wrong . . the NFL needs to be pro-active and aggressive, not passive and reactive. But that is the DNA of many (not all) corporate structures. They foster reactive cultures and so don’t deal with issues until they hit crisis. This should never have come to that. If Kareem Hunt had a brain (and the video seems to indicate his sense is lacking) he would have come forward on his own. Said it was bad. Said he messed up. Discussed a voluntary 8 game suspension and admitted his assault. We are a forgiving culture. We do not forgive as easily when you only apologize a year later when the video comes out. We know what that is and Kareem Hunt will pay the price for his silence as will the Chiefs/ NFL for their reactive approach.

  31. Once the video is made part of the police report and the police report becomes no longer confidential under FOIA, anyone wishing to file a FOIA request and pay for the video’s reproduction may obtain it.

    How can it be anything other than incompetence or gross manipulation that the NFL or any team would claim that they were unable to obtain a copy of the video?

    The issue really always come back to timing. Who knew what and when did they know. The NFL have become fools for trying to pretend like they can’t get a video.

  32. dryzzt23 says:
    December 1, 2018 at 10:45 am
    Why hasn’t De Smith and the NFLPA disciplined Hunt yet?
    ————————–
    Because its a union and not an employer???

  33. One thing we know for sure are that Hunt’s actions didn’t rise to the level of brutality that Ray Rice inflicted. A push and a half hearted kick to the legs just did not rise to that level of violence.

    For the Chiefs to throw the kid under the bus was a gross overreaction. The Chiefs have done the same as throw the players and fans under the bus as well.

    Screw the Chiefs.

  34. Isn’t it just possible that TMZ, as a supposed media entity, can obtain information from “sources” in ways that otherwise might be criminal in nature but are protected by First Amendment privileges, whereas if the NFL tried to do the same thing it would quickly find itself in some eager prosecutor’s cross-hairs? Think about all the “leaks” that flow from government employees to the New York Times and Washington Post, and then think about how many of those “leakers” are ever prosecuted. If the NFL tried to use TMZ’s tactics for obtaining information/video tapes, that cure might be worse for it than the disease.

  35. As a Cowboy fan I was pissed when Zeke had to follow though with the 6 game suspension due to I didn’t think he deserve it. I think the NFL office was out to get Zeke and they did. On the bright side I got a big laugh when Jerry Jones got called to the NFL office over this. He was then Fined and humiliated by the NFL front office, other powerful owners, and the national media. So it was not all bad for me watching Jerry eat crow just shortly after he received a Gold Jacket that he did not deserve.

  36. defscottyb says:
    December 1, 2018 at 1:32 pm

    Plus… she hit or slapped him… so, men are just supposed to be ok with that?

    ————————————————————-

    By her appearance she probably weighs 100lbs. Hunt is a 200lb professional football player. Let’s not pretend this was Rhonda Rousey taking a swing at a 140lb man. Size matters.

  37. What annoys me about some of you that are defending the NFL here is that you are picking and choosing. Think about it. When it came to Tom Brady the nfl spent 2 years, and $6 million investigating and litigating. When it came to Hunt and Rice (both were playing for teams in position to keep the Pats out of the SB, if you are into conspiracies) the investigation went as far as: “hello mr hunt, did you do it?”. “Hey mr Goodell, Kareem said he didn’t do it, should we look at the video? No, ok, heading back to New York”

    Give me a break. If the NFL wants to get you, they get you (brady and zeke and Big Ben). If they don’t want to get you (rice and hunt) they put forth absolutely zero effort, and then say they investigated. Either investigate or don’t, but you can’t investigate and clear the player of all wrong doing, and then give us the “we never saw the video until today and we are shocked and appalled” response after. The cops sent the NFL a copy of the Rice video, certified mail, the NFL received it, and signed for it, and watched it, or should have since it was in their offices. This time, they either saw it and gave him a pass, or they are completely negligent and should all be fired. You can’t spend $6 million investigating air pressure and then act like $15k is too much money for a hotel video. Get out of here with that

  38. If NFL and the team, went about it legally and tried to obtain the video thru hotel management and police, but didn’t/couldn’t, you can’t compare it to TMZ. I don’t like the narrative that TMZ got it so NFL/team should have gotten it also. TMZ could have paid off a hotel employee who obtain the video illegally. TMZ could argue in court, it was given to them or they purchased it off an employee but the onus is on the employee who obtain the video illegally. That does not mean that NFL or team should go down that line.

  39. akira1971 says:
    December 1, 2018 at 11:45 am
    sportoficionado says: “All these issues in the front office have occured under the watch of one commissioner.”
    =================================

    HOF Warren Moon beat his wife and his son called 911 to report it. What did commissioner Tabliabue do? Nothing. No suspension. No fine. Just another day of football. Seriously, is that what you want again?

    Goodell is trying to impose a standard of conduct for his employees. Something that’s NEVER happened before. But sure, let’s criticize the only NFL commissioner that’s trying to clean up player behaviour.
    ———————

    BS. Goodell was complicit in helping the Ravens sweep the Ray Rice situation under the rug, until the video came out, and the pathetic 1-game suspension he gave a known serial domestic abuser Josh Brown was completely stupid. Then he went completely overboard with Elliott, suspending him for 6-games, even though there was zero credible evidence he did anything at all. Of course, Elliott’s suspension was all because of the corrupt Lisa Friel, who is a known Giants super fan.

    Goodell doesn’t have the first clue as to how to handle player behavior or discipline.

  40. akira1971 says:
    December 1, 2018 at 10:54 am
    According to ESPN, “Sources told ESPN’s Adam Schefter that neither the NFL nor the Chiefs had viewed the video before it became public Friday. The league made multiple attempts to obtain it. The hotel told NFL representatives that it was corporate policy to turn video over only to law enforcement and therefore could not provide it to the league.

    The NFL also contacted the Cleveland Police Department, which did not provide the league any video. Even though no charges were filed by law enforcement, the NFL continued its investigation, which included contacting the victims of the alleged incident, but they did not respond to multiple messages.”
    ==============================

    Please tell me what other LEGAL means does the league have in trying to obtain the video? Do you seriously believe a large corporation would try to bribe a low-level hotel security guard to make a copy of the video like TMZ did?

    ——————————-

    There’s another possibility here. That hotel security or corrupt Cleveland PD saw a payday opportunity and were using the video as leverage to shake down Hunt.

    He’s a 3rd rd pick on his rookie contract…doesn’t have a lot of money yet. Point shaving or something similar would be worth more. If he refused to cooperate, they may have decided to make the video available to the highest bidder (i.e. TMZ).

    The NFL/Chiefs may have known…and decided that violence on tape was a lesser black eye than a point shaving scandal with how much money DFS/Gambling is worth to the league. The decision to release Hunt so quickly makes me think it was always a fall back plan if the video was made public.

  41. “We have stand your ground laws in this country.”

    ———

    Ohio does not have a stand your ground law in public. You can only do that from within one’s home, and the vehicle is considered an extension of the home there.

  42. “Zeke got suspended partly because (it only later emerged) the phone logs and electronic media he supposedly handed in to “prove” his innocence had in fact been heavily redacted by him to exclude all meaningful interactions with the woman. And also partly because of the breast-exposing episode. And maybe the NFL also reconsidered his openly buying drugs in Seattle hours before a preseasoner there (something they and Boys previously turned a blind eye to).”

    Dude, what are you smoking. Go back an read the NFL investigation report on Zeke. He was suspended by Goodell based only on testimony from the girl and three investigators who happened to be fans of the Giants , Redskins and Steelers if I’m correct. They NEVER spoke with Zeke, nor did Zeke have the opportunity to confront his accuser. Throw in the fact that one of the female investigators who spoke with the girl in length, stated that the girl was not being truthful and was out to get money and destroy Zeke’s reputation. The erased info from his cell phone contained back and forth arguments between the two but NO VIOLENCE laced dialog. You might want to do your homework before posting BS. Zeke was railroaded because of the incompetence of Goodell and the NFL in general.

  43. Well, if Hunt is only going to get suspended for a few games (or even the rest of this season), then the Eagles should swoop in and sign him NOW! By next season, he’ll be reinstated and they’ll have a star running back.

  44. The woman was obviuously looking for trouble and trying to bait Hunt into touching her so she could cash in. There is no excuse for hitting or beating a woman but that’s not what happened, he barely touched her. The Chiefs over-reacted to a minor incident.

  45. Ray Rice video was a cell phone camera recording a security monitor replay at Revel Hotel and Casino, and was sold to TMZ on the day Revel went out of business. Hotels don’t share or sell security video because guests will see it as a violation of privacy and stop staying there.
    The NFL can only attempt to secure video and any other evidence through 100% legal avenues. Doing otherwise would be thrown out because they had “unclean hands” in their activities. I am only a high school graduate and I know this-why don’t legally educated media companies proclaim this?

  46. It wasn’t just a league investigator who didn’t believe the accuser Florio, it was the LEAD investigator who interviewed the woman 3 times. Please give all the facts in retelling this story. Elliott was screwed, pure and simple.

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