When videos are available, NFL won’t mimic TMZ

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The NFL can’t beat TMZ, but the NFL won’t be joining TMZ.

NFL special counsel for conduct Todd Jones told reporters on Wednesday that the league won’t start paying for videos or other information relevant to investigations regarding player misconduct.

“I think that is not likely at all, for a number of reasons,” Jones said regarding the possibility of paying for videos. “Not the least of which is you all have a journalistic privilege, you all have First Amendment protections. You all can get information from sources and wrap it up in sort of like sources . . . we don’t have that luxury. To become mercenary and pay for videos opens up a Pandora’s box of all kinds of opportunities and things that may come to us from not just surveillance video in public places or surveillance video in residences, but you’re talking about the world of social media and everybody on a smart phone as TMZ’s in the business of doing, is buying people’s smart phone snippets for a fee, and the NFL’s not going there.”

That echoes an explanation posted here last Wednesday regarding the question of whether the league’s effort to track down videos would include cutting checks. And while the league has its own journalistic arm, the NFL wouldn’t be buying videos to publicize them for media purposes but to use them as the basis for imposing discipline.

Indeed, the NFL in most cases would be tempted to conceal the videos. Which leads back to the question of whether the NFL truly wants to get these videos, or whether the NFL is content to simply wait for someone else to get the video (or, even better, not get the video) and then shrug and say, “Well, we tried.”

27 responses to “When videos are available, NFL won’t mimic TMZ

  1. The NFL should just bite the bullet and make a financial agreement with TMZ. Something along the lines of “if you get video of one of our employees please notify us first and we’ll list credit you as the source and let you release it in due time.” It would save the league a ton of embarrassment but when things make sense, they are a no go in Roger’s World.

  2. The league has already decided to be it’s own law enforcement entity. They just need now to petition or lobby, or whatever it takes, and acquire the power to subpoena. Then they just need to hire their own prosecutors and voila!…they’re in the law enforcement business! Yeah I know this is a stupid idea, but the NFL is handling criminal cases stupidly already.

  3. The NFL is FULL of criminals and miscreants and the last thing the NFL wants to be able to do is expose all of them which would define the NFL as to what it really is….

  4. Why would the league pay ransom for a video that shows a player engaged in criminal behavior when they can just let TMZ do it for them and suspend said payer down the road?

  5. he NFL should just bite the bullet and make a financial agreement with TMZ. Something along the lines of “if you get video of one of our employees please notify us first and we’ll list credit you as the source and let you release it in due time.” It would save the league a ton of embarrassment but when things make sense, they are a no go in Roger’s World.

    Look how much mention tmz is getting now.

  6. Just get out of the self-investigation business. If it’s a criminal system issue, let it be handled as such

  7. Why can’t the NFL’s legal counsel figure out a way to subpoena evidence?
    _______________________

    The league does not subpoena power. They are a non-profit (lol) private organization. Just how like any other corporation (Google or Apple) can’t force someone to turn over evidence.

  8. Why in the world is there a “NFL special counsel for conduct”? That title sounds as creepy as the concept it represents.

    The NFL is a sports league, not an extra-judicial body. Who cares about how its players, coaches, and front office personnel “conduct” themselves off the field? Their off the field conduct has no effect on the product on the field.

  9. I think that when the NFL interrogates a suspect they should hook him up to the Maury Povich truth-telling machine.

  10. Listen I don’t disagree that you might want to bridge a gap, but the outrage of not wanting to take a TMZ approach to “evidence?” Seriously? TMZ is a step above the National Enquirer and there’s a whole bunch of things that get debunked. The outrage? You just want to feel the bad. That isn’t healthy.

  11. gonakgod says:
    December 12, 2018 at 2:44 pm
    Jerry Jones has been paying for videos for decades… although he pays for them to destroy them.
    =============================

    Yup, that’s part of the job of Dez Bryant’s handler/ fixer/ babysitter. He “took care of” the many transgressions that never saw public eye including paying off victims, intimidation, using Jerry’s influence with Dallas PD, etc.

  12. “Indeed, the NFL in most cases would be tempted to conceal the videos. Which leads back to the question of whether the NFL truly wants to get these videos”

    Yes they would conceal them as they did with the Ray Rice video, and no they don’t want them they don’t want to know. The reality is the owners and league offices barely even consider domestic violence a crime, they’ve repeatedly covered up these incidents, and don’t view them as a reason to keep players off the field.

    The sad reality is they consider smoking weed and wearing the wrong color cleats worse violations than beating a woman

  13. Tmz is owned by warnermedia.. If the NFL office needs something removed. They will

    All these billionaires are setting at the same table

  14. The NFL needs to bring TMZ to heel. Placing them on the Commissioner’s Exempt List should do it.

  15. The NFL has labor disputes with players all the time. If they can get that case in front of a court they will have subpoena power via discovery. They just need a litigation to do it.

  16. robf2010 says: “I think this is a good thing. If the NFL got their hands on damning evidence, I think they would squash it. I prefer the sunshine route.”
    ====================

    Um, they regularly fine/suspend players that fans previously had no idea about… PEDs, conduct issues, etc. Why would one player get special treatment and have his evidence squashed, but not others?

    Seriously, football players are replaceable commodities. Even big stars disappear quickly (Peyton Manning, Ray Lewis, Urlancher, etc) and new ones pop up the next day (Wentz, Watson, Kamara, etc.)

  17. Yeah, give a private business subpoena power like they’re actually recognized legal authorities. Imagine your boss presenting you with a video of you in Vegas then docking your pay or firing you. How about we leave that to legally mandated entities. It was even explained why the NFL doesn’t do this, but reading and comprehension is a reach for some.

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