Josh Gordon could return from another indefinite suspension, in theory

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With Patriots receiver Josh Gordon facing another indefinite banishment from the NFL, following the indefinite banishment he previously served (which definitely covered two full seasons and then some), some have asked whether Gordon or any other player eventually can be suspended for good, with no chance of returning.

Based on the language of the substance-abuse policy, it appears that a player can, in theory, be suspended indefinitely an indefinite number of times, with the ability each time to return to the NFL.

Of course, each time a player is suspended indefinitely, he definitely must miss at least one year. And so, at some point, a player who misses multiple years during indefinite suspensions eventually will see age diminish his skills.

Also, for every player who is indefinitely suspended, it’s hardly automatic that he’ll be back after only one year. The last time this happened to Gordon, he missed well over two years before he secured reinstatement. If Gordon, who turns 28 in April, misses another two years, he’ll be 30 when he’s back.

Then there’s the reality that the player must continue to comply with the substance-abuse policy and program while away from the NFL. If the player can’t comply while in the game, it doesn’t get any easier to comply when he’s cut off from his team and left to his own devices.

Although a very small handful of players are ever ensnared in this extreme consequence for the failure to comply with the substance-abuse policy, those who get in have a hard time getting out.

But there’s still a path to resetting the clock. If a player who has been reinstated can avoid any positive tests for 24 months, he falls out of Stage III of the program and is no different than any other player, facing only one substance-abuse test per year.

27 responses to “Josh Gordon could return from another indefinite suspension, in theory

  1. What team is going to sign a guy who has proven he can’t be counted on to show up to work fewer than 26 weeks out of the year? On top of that, he’d be 30 years old at the start of the next full season he could potentially play and would have played like 15 games in 5 years.

    If he’s suspended indefinitely, he’ll be selling cars again. He’s done.

  2. Back in the late 80’s Dexter Manley had his 3rd strike and was suspended for life. Which in turn meant Manley was eligible for reinstatement in one year. I believe he played a couple years after his 3rd strike suspension.

  3. The NFL needs to quit demonizing weed. It’s not like it’s performance enhancing, and more states legalize it recreationally every year. The NFL is fine with handing out opiates like skittles, but a little weed gets someone a suspension? It just doesn’t make sense…

  4. drug addiction is just that, it is a mental health issue and must be dealt with
    the pain med’s they give these young players to keep them up and playing plays a large part in these issues
    they must be dealt with in a fair, humane way, that is focused on the player getting better
    football is still his livelihood, but getting him better first is a priority

  5. miamibeak says:

    December 20, 2018 at 11:15 am

    The Steve Howe of football…if you don’t know who Steve Howe was look him up .

    ________________________

    Yes…now there’s a story with a very sad ending.

  6. I remember that part of the criticism put on the Dallas Cowboys for giving up a 1st round pick for Amari Cooper was “meanwhile, the Patriots got Josh Gordon for a 5th round pick”. I tried to explain to those folks that Gordon was a player a team could not rely on, so it was a pure dice role for New England. It made sense for a team like that to take the shot, but for a team like Dallas (that needed reliable help and has had enough suspensions in recent seasons) it would have been a foolish move, no matter how cheap.

  7. coats2m says: “The NFL needs to quit demonizing weed. It’s not like it’s performance enhancing, and more states legalize it recreationally every year. The NFL is fine with handing out opiates like skittles, but a little weed gets someone a suspension? It just doesn’t make sense…”
    ======================

    Doesn’t matter. The NFLPA negoatiated the Drug Policy and the players agreed to the punishments.

    A lot of Americans ride motorcycles and ATVs, yet NFL contracts forbid players from enjoying those recreations too. As a player, you know the trade-offs.

  8. I think it’s past the point of returning from another suspension. I think it’s to the point now where no team is going to invest even a dollar or a second on this guy. He’s incapable of staying on the field. He’s a great talent but when he can only be counted on for a few months I don’t think teams will think he’s worth the risk, at any price. It’s really bad too because it’s late in the season and it’s not like they can make a trade for someone else to fill the hole. The only thing they can do now is sign some guy that has been cut by another team. However, a team could just go with some guy who may not be as talented but they have faith he can develop and be around for an entire season. I think we’ve seen the last of Gordon on an NFL team.

  9. Another brick in the wall. I predicted that when Miami ran back the kick off against them 2 weeks ago that was the beginning of the end. I have seen it a few times that there is a moment in time when the worm turns. The next will be they will lose their bye and have to go on the road. They will lose. Gronk retires, maybe even Brady. Evil Bill steps down and the slide will be in full force.

  10. If this actually is a failed test/violation of his terms….. pretty safe bet that JG is history as far as his NFL career goes…
    SAD….JUST SAD.

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    Josh Gordon could return from another indefinite suspension, in theory
    Posted by Mike Florio on December 20, 2018, 11:09 AM EST
    Getty Images

    With Patriots receiver Josh Gordon facing another indefinite banishment from the NFL, following the indefinite banishment he previously served (which definitely covered two full seasons and then some), some have asked whether Gordon or any other player eventually can be suspended for good, with no chance of returning.

    Based on the language of the substance-abuse policy, it appears that a player can, in theory, be suspended indefinitely an indefinite number of times, with the ability each time to return to the NFL.

    Of course, each time a player is suspended indefinitely, he definitely must miss at least one year. And so, at some point, a player who misses multiple years during indefinite suspensions eventually will see age diminish his skills.

    Also, for every player who is indefinitely suspended, it’s hardly automatic that he’ll be back after only one year. The last time this happened to Gordon, he missed well over two years before he secured reinstatement. If Gordon, who turns 28 in April, misses another two years, he’ll be 30 when he’s back.

    Then there’s the reality that the player must continue to comply with the substance-abuse policy and program while away from the NFL. If the player can’t comply while in the game, it doesn’t get any easier to comply when he’s cut off from his team and left to his own devices.

    Although a very small handful of players are ever ensnared in this extreme consequence for the failure to comply with the substance-abuse policy, those who get in have a hard time getting out.

    But there’s still a path to resetting the clock. If a player who has been reinstated can avoid any positive tests for 24 months, he falls out of Stage III of the program and is no different than any other player, facing only one substance-abuse test per year.
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    Permalink 12 Comments Feed for comments Back to top
    12 responses to “Josh Gordon could return from another indefinite suspension, in theory”

    barsfordays says:
    December 20, 2018 at 11:13 am

    Enough football talk about Josh. Let this man focus on his life, football is an afterthought for him now
    miamibeak says:
    December 20, 2018 at 11:15 am

    The Steve Howe of football…if you don’t know who Steve Howe was look him up .
    arealisticpackerfan says:
    December 20, 2018 at 11:21 am

    What team is going to sign a guy who has proven he can’t be counted on to show up to work fewer than 26 weeks out of the year? On top of that, he’d be 30 years old at the start of the next full season he could potentially play and would have played like 15 games in 5 years.

    If he’s suspended indefinitely, he’ll be selling cars again. He’s done.
    sigbouncer says:
    December 20, 2018 at 11:25 am

    Back in the late 80’s Dexter Manley had his 3rd strike and was suspended for life. Which in turn meant Manley was eligible for reinstatement in one year. I believe he played a couple years after his 3rd strike suspension.
    williamshatnerstoupee says:
    December 20, 2018 at 11:27 am

    ^^And how he ended up.
    coats2m says:
    December 20, 2018 at 11:27 am

    The NFL needs to quit demonizing weed. It’s not like it’s performance enhancing, and more states legalize it recreationally every year. The NFL is fine with handing out opiates like skittles, but a little weed gets someone a suspension? It just doesn’t make sense…
    doug ablitt says:
    December 20, 2018 at 11:36 am

    drug addiction is just that, it is a mental health issue and must be dealt with
    the pain med’s they give these young players to keep them up and playing plays a large part in these issues
    they must be dealt with in a fair, humane way, that is focused on the player getting better
    football is still his livelihood, but getting him better first is a priority
    vaphinfan says:
    December 20, 2018 at 11:37 am

    Mental health…every athletes new excuse.
    bradygirl12 says:
    December 20, 2018 at 11:41 am

    miamibeak says:

    December 20, 2018 at 11:15 am

    The Steve Howe of football…if you don’t know who Steve Howe was look him up .

    ________________________

    Yes…now there’s a story with a very sad ending.

    Yeah. I still remember Vin Scully mentioning Howe repeatedly throughout an afternoon game, that he was missing from the Dodgers bullpen. That’s when it first hit the fan, that Howe was a serious substance abuser. Scully wasn’t going to let it go. He knew Howe needed help, which is why he kept mentioning it almost every inning.

    I hope Gordon can slay those demons, the very demons who killed Howe.

  12. And just a few days ago you were once again gushing over Belickick’s “successful reclamation projects”.

  13. Michael E says:

    December 20, 2018 at 12:40 pm

    And just a few days ago you were once again gushing over Belickick’s “successful reclamation projects”.
    ==========================================
    To be fair, you cant win em all.

  14. One day, after a number of good players have paid fines, lost careers, and are humiliated, the NFL will eventually relax and allow weed. If not they can go the Ricky Williams route, embrace the times, and open a weed shop.

  15. Why does the NFL ban players for using non-performance enhancing drugs. If it’s recreational drugs, then let the team and the player’s performance on the field determine whether they can or cannot play.

    Are NFL officials who work in the corporate offices subject to drug testing or to a drug use policy? Most employers do not drug test unless the employee is driving or using dangerous machines. Politicians, CEOs, lawyers, and many other professionals aren’t drug tested.

  16. Everything would be fine if the NFL would just let him smoke weed…A percentage of weed users do become addicted…and withdrawal is hard for anyone…especially cold turkey the way the NFL wants it…

  17. The NFL is a joke – stop with these suspensions – give the player one chance to come clean and to play clean – ban him for a year, seek treatment, and with documented perfect attendance, he can come back. Screw up again and he should be banned for life.

  18. If this is over Marijuana it’s ridiculous. Your going to ban a player for two years for using Marijuana. Then any player who strikes
    a woman should be banned for life. No exceptions. Something is wrong with league where a person who is under the influence of alcohol can get charged with manslaughter and be reinstated yet a player who smokes a couple of joints at home is banned for two years because he is a repeat offender.

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