NFL reminds teams of procedures for interviewing employees who have resigned or retired

Getty Images

The coaching carousel will soon spin. But not everyone will be able to automatically grab a seat.

Per a league source, the NFL sent a memo to all coaches, General Managers, and other high-level personnel reminding the teams of the procedures applicable to non-players who have resigned or retired from another team.

“An employee under contract to a member club (including a head coach, general manager, or other “high level” employee) who voluntarily resigns or retires prior to the expiration of his contract, is not free to discuss or accept employment with another NFL club without the consent of the prior-employer club,” the memo explains. “This is true for the full remaining term of the employee’s contract. If a club wishes to consent to discussions of a substitute employment arrangement, that club may condition its consent on receiving appropriate compensation from the member club wishing to discuss employment with and/or hire the employee who has ‘retired’ or ‘resigned.’ Once an employee’s contract has expired, the employee is free to seek other employment with another NFL club, assuming there has been compliance with the Anti-Tampering Policy.”

As the source pointed out, there has to be a reason for the memo. And the most obvious reason would be the possibility that teams will attempt to interview retired Cardinals coach Bruce Arians. Although Arians has said he’s interested in coaching only the Browns, other teams may contact him once jobs begin to spring open.

Absent an express written agreement between the employee and his former team, the procedures quoted above apply. Which means that they potentially restrict the ability of teams that will be firing their coaches to deal with Arians without first dealing with the Cardinals.

11 responses to “NFL reminds teams of procedures for interviewing employees who have resigned or retired

  1. Let me put my lawyer glasses on. So retired or resigned coaches can’t accept another job if still under contract. Ok so if I’m still under contract during my resignation or retirement will you be paying me the remainder of the money owed in accordance to the terms of the deal? Or will the deal be voided if I decide to find another job. Either way I will get paid from the old team or new team who will compensate me for any lost money for voiding my contract to come out of retirement. I could care less about the team I’m under contract with, we will all get paid. It’s just business lol.

  2. scutz1972 says:
    December 26, 2018 at 8:51 pm
    Who in their right mind would really want to hire this loud mouth loser?

    I’d imagine a few teams would. Hey if Marvin Lewis can keep a job, anything is possible. Clearly the Bengals don’t care about winning.

  3. It doesn’t matter if you like Arians or not, he was successful with a franchise not known for winning. The Cards won 50 games in 5 years with BA. How have they looked since he left?

  4. Let me put my lawyer glasses on. So retired or resigned coaches can’t accept another job if still under contract. Ok so if I’m still under contract during my resignation or retirement will you be paying me the remainder of the money owed in accordance to the terms of the deal? Or will the deal be voided if I decide to find another job. Either way I will get paid from the old team or new team who will compensate me for any lost money for voiding my contract to come out of retirement. I could care less about the team I’m under contract with, we will all get paid. It’s just business lol.

    …Because then coaches would just retire to get out of a contract and then un-retire to go sign with another team of their choosing, and loads of collusion would go hand-in-hand with that. Probably, it is foolish to even have contracts for coaches in the first place. 1) Team ownership fires gobs of coaches under contract each and every year 2) if you like your coach, pay them more money and treat them very well (give them what they ask for) to keep them, otherwise they can try for another team that has a more palatable ownership. There’s enough drama and tom-foolery involved with players and contracts, coaching doesn’t need that too.

  5. This is one NFL rule I support. These coaches move from city to city. They have no loyalty, (although they demand it of their players), and will quit for a better opportunity in a heartbeat. No one should sign a contract, then retire and then return to take a new job. When Calvin Johnson retired from the Detroit Lions, everyone would’ve flipped out if he returned a season later with a new team. That is not the way contracts are supposed to work and I support this NFL rule.

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to leave a comment. Not a member? Register now!