Report: MLB would allow a big-league contract to help A’s sign Kyler Murray

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Major League Baseball wants Kyler Murray’s star power.

Murray, the Heisman Trophy-winning Oklahoma quarterback who was a first-round draft pick of the Oakland A’s, is in the process of deciding which sport to play and reportedly wants $15 million to play baseball.

Under normal circumstances, that wouldn’t fly: Major League Baseball (like the NFL) has rules that prevent recently drafted players and teams from renegotiating contracts. But Jeff Passan of ESPN reports that MLB is willing to allow the A’s to negotiate a lucrative big-league contract for Murray, if that’s what it takes to get him to play baseball.

Although that might seem unfair to other teams, and to other young players who aren’t afforded the same luxury, it’s easy to see why MLB would bend over backward for Murray: He’s one of the brightest young stars in American sports, and it would be a coup for baseball to lure him away from football. Murray would sell plenty of tickets to minor league games, and when he makes it to the majors he’d draw plenty of television eyeballs. Baseball wants to get Murray away from the gridiron and on the diamond, and is willing to show him the money to do it.

22 responses to “Report: MLB would allow a big-league contract to help A’s sign Kyler Murray

  1. No backbone by the MLB. Guy plays football for two years and comes back to baseball when he gets cut.

  2. Not a fan of that at all, if they are willing to waive rules this time then they should every time.

  3. Hmmmm wonder if he is getting injustice?? I mean sounds like to me he is getting special treatment..why is that?

  4. Underwhelming player – another product of slick marketing and hype. He better sign with the MLB because he won’t cut it in the NFL.

  5. vaphinfan says:
    January 13, 2019 at 6:45 pm
    Why does he get to do it and no one else?

    Name someone that’s accomplished just half of what he’s done since his freshman year in high school and there is your answer.

  6. They don’t want him to suffer serious injury while playing in thr NFL either. Im sure if we were talking NBA it wouldnt be as urgent that he not play in the other leauge.

  7. Regardless of which sport, contracts should be standardized until performance warrants an adjustment. Past non professional accomplishments do not always translate into “big league performance”. Pay me 15 million, or else? I will play for whoever/whichever pays me the most, up front? Cmon man!

  8. The kid is special. MLB makes an executive decision they feel is in the interest of MLB. Whiners don’t like it because they’re not in position to do the same. Easy answer, hope for better genes next time. Oh wait.

  9. Because he has more value to MLB than anyone else.

    By value I think you mean potential. Hasn’t done squat in either. But it’s more likely he succeed in baseball than football

  10. Why should anyone care about how much money Murray can get from baseball? It is not our money, it is not any of our business. If anything, we should be happy for his success.

  11. Umm, maybe they shouldn’t have drafted the guy, then let him play collegiately (when some players can’t have YouTube channels), or maybe they shouldn’t have trusted Scott Boras? Either way if the A’s lose their #1 draft pick, that’s on them.

  12. Let me help you guys out. They’re only doing it because they need to sell seats to get support for their new stadium. 15M is chump change for what a new stadium can do for the whole league

  13. Regardless of which sport, contracts should be standardized until performance warrants an adjustment. Past non professional accomplishments do not always translate into “big league performance”. Pay me 15 million, or else? I will play for whoever/whichever pays me the most, up front? Cmon man!
    —————–

    Or it could be like every other business, and the free market could dictate what he makes. And in that case, he’d make a heck of a lot more than what he’s going to end up getting, regardless of which sport he chooses.

  14. People don’t watch sports for the names or personalities. We follow our team, whoever is wearing the uniform at the time. When the minor (non-NFL) sports leagues learn this, maybe they can figure out how to challenge the NFL for media supremacy. Until then they’ll keep trying to promote their stars and play second or third fiddle to pro football.

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